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Speech Research Group

Volunteering

Participants wanted

We are running a study on child language development and are looking for children who stammer, up to the age of 12 to take part. We are specifically looking into the difficulty of early acquired words and their impact on spoken word production.

The research will help us eventually to understand more about speech and language disorders in children.

Contact Diane at diane.leung@ucl.ac.uk

Volunteer for studies on stuttering whether you are a fluent person, a child or adult who stutters


We are always looking for volunteers to participate in our research.  If you are the parent or guardian of a child who stutters or has any other communication disorder and the child is between the ages of 4 to 5 (reception year at school) and wish to participate in our study then please contact Ms Avin Mirawdeli on a.mirawdeli@ucl.ac.uk


Older speakers who stutter can volunteer to do experiments as well. Again please contact a.mirawdeli@ucl.ac.uk.  Current projects include examination of speech-language and motor function, anxiety and other psychological factors.


Please see details below for our current research on children who stutter.

Assessing speech fluency problems in typically developing children aged 4 to 5 years.

  • Basis of the research:

We aim to screen children between the ages of 4 to 5 for speech disfluency including things like stuttering, cluttering, dyslexia or any other speech or communication problems.

  • Why is this research important?                     

Fluency problems can have a detrimental impact on the individual’s life if not resolved early. Ineffectiveness of communication can impact on personal relationships and social interactions as well as employment opportunities and quality of life.

  • Why are the children being screened so young?                                                            

Much recent research has focussed on the importance of early identification of, and intervention on, young children with communication disorders.  Intervention is most effective when provided at early childhood, rather than during adolescence (Bercow Report, 2008).


If interested please contact Ms Avin Mirawdeli on a.mirawdeli@ucl.ac.uk or 020 7679 5401.