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Latest News

Medical Poetics: call for entries for Yale-UCL Medicine poetry competition

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medicinepoetry

This year's Yale-UCL poetry competition is now open for entries from medical students looking to render their Aesculapian experiences in verse… and win £1000. The upcoming deadline is Saturday, 10 May 2014 and the winner(s) will be announced at the end of July.

UCL Professor Jane Dacre elected president of the Royal College of Physicians

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Professor Jane Dacre

Professor Jane Dacre was elected president of the Royal College of Physicians last night, by single transferable vote from a field of ten candidates, in a ballot organised by Electoral Reform Services. The result was announced at the end of College Day, the day of the RCP’s Annual General Meeting. Professor Dacre won by 281 votes from the next nearest candidate and becomes the third female president in the RCP’s history. In total there were 4,933 valid votes, and following nine voting transfers Professor Dacre was elected with 1,848 votes.

Mayor launches MedCity with £4.1m investment

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UCL Quad and UCL Hospital

The Mayor of London today launched MedCity, a partnership between UCLPartners, King’s Health Partners, Imperial College AHSC, Oxford, Cambridge and the Greater London Authority, to establish London and the Greater South East as a world-leading cluster for life sciences.

Light-activated neurons from stem cells restore function to paralysed muscles

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Diagram of optical muscle control system

A new way to artificially control muscles using light, with the potential to restore function to muscles paralysed by conditions such as motor neuron disease and spinal cord injury, has been developed by scientists at UCL and King’s College London.

Launch of new research unit in blood borne and sexually transmitted infections

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A new collaboration of health protection researchers across UCL, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Public Health England has launched today.

UCL and Max Planck Society invest €5m to open world’s first computational psychiatry centre

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Professor Peter Gruss, President of the Max Planck Society

The world’s first centre for computational psychiatry was launched on Tuesday 1st April, following a €5m investment from the Max Planck Society and UCL to be spent over the next 5 years.

UCL study finds new evidence linking fruit and vegetable consumption with lower mortality

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Fruit and vegetables

Eating seven or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day reduces your risk of death at any point in time by 42% compared to eating less than one portion, reports a new UCL study.

Quality early childhood programs help prevent chronic diseases in later life

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Family

Disadvantaged children who attend high-quality early childhood development programs including healthcare and nutrition have significantly improved health as adults, reports a new study.

Cell-saving drugs could reduce brain damage after stroke

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Capillaries showing pericytes in purple

Long-term brain damage caused by stroke could be reduced by saving cells called pericytes that control blood flow in capillaries, reports a new UCL-led study.

Shorter sleepers are over-eaters

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Baby sleeping

Young children who sleep less eat more, which can lead to obesity and related health problems later in life, reports a new study by UCL researchers.

Statins could help control multiple sclerosis

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Dr Jeremy Chataway

A high dose of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin significantly reduces brain shrinkage in people with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), found researchers supported by the Biomedical Research Centre at UCL and UCLH, with colleagues from Imperial College London, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Brighton and Sussex Medical School.

Three quarters of people with seasonal and pandemic flu have no symptoms

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Masked train passengers in Mexico City during 2009 Swine Flu outbreak

Around 1 in 5 of the population were infected in both recent outbreaks of seasonal flu and the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, but just 23% of these infections caused symptoms, and only 17% of people were ill enough to consult their doctor, according to new UCL-led research.

Information overload acts ‘to dim the lights’ on what we see

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300sq RAF Pilot Training in Cockpit of Nimrod Aircraft


Too much visual information causes a phenomenon known as ‘load induced blindness’, with an effect akin to dimming the lights, reports a new UCL study.

UCL researchers set to take their research to parliament

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SET for Britain group

Sixteen researchers from around UCL have been shortlisted to present their research to a panel of expert judges and over 100 MPs in this year’s SET for Britain competition.

Human brains ‘hard-wired’ to link what we see with what we do

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Active brain

Your brain’s ability to instantly link what you see with what you do is down to a dedicated information ‘highway’, suggests new UCL-led research.

Invisible light bursts are keeping animals away from power lines

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Reindeer

Animals may avoid high voltage power cables because of flashing UV light that is undetectable to humans, scientists say.

Natural selection has altered the appearance of Europeans over the past 5,000 years

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Yamnaya Skeleton

Ancient DNA from archaeological skeletons shows that Europeans had darker skin, hair, and eye pigmentation 5,000 years ago.

Spread of antibiotic resistance understood by unravelling bacterial secretion system

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Bacterial type IV secretion system

The system that allows the sharing of genetic material between bacteria – and therefore the spread of antibiotic resistance – has been uncovered by a team of scientists from UCL and Birkbeck, University of London.

Education ‘protects’ poor women from fattening effects of rising wealth

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Education fair in Egypt

Obesity levels among women in low- and middle-income countries tend to rise in line with wealth as they purchase more energy-dense foods, but a new UCL study suggests that more educated consumers make better food choices that mitigate this effect.

MAMS-TB trial stops recruiting patients to two arms

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The MAMS-TB trial, being conducted by the PanACEA consortium is stopping recruiting patients to two of its arms. This follows a meeting of the Independent Data Monitoring Committee (IDMC) which looked at interim analyses. The IDMC recommended that the arms testing the HRZQ and HR20ZQ combinations of drugs should be closed, as the interim results were not promising enough. These two arms include the drug SQ109 instead of ethambutol in the standard 6-month combination with rifampicin given at the higher dose of 20mg/kg in the HR20ZQ arm. Patients are still being recruited to the other three arms of the trial.

Deputy Director for the Life Study

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Professor Carol Dezateux, Director of Life Study at the UCL Institute of Child Health, is delighted to announce the appointment of Professor Peter Elias as Deputy Director of the Study.

New innovation could mean eye injections are a thing of the past

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Human Eye

Drugs used to treat blindness-causing disorders could be successfully administered by eye drops rather than unpleasant and expensive eye injections, according to new research led by UCL scientists that could be a breakthrough for the millions worldwide suffering from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other eye disorders. 

New partnership between UCLP brain tumour scientists and Brain Tumour Research

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We are delighted to announce a ground-breaking new research partnership between Queen Mary University of London and UCL Institute of Neurology (under UCLPartners) and the charity Brain Tumour Research. The partnership begins a new chapter in long-term, sustainable and continuous research into brain tumours, the biggest cancer killer of children and adults under 40.

Climate change causes high, but predictable, extinction risks 

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Ornate box turtle

Judging the effects of climate change on extinction may be easier than previously thought, according to a paper published today in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Climate change won't reduce winter deaths

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London snow by Edvvc on Flickr square

Climate change is unlikely to reduce the UK’s excess winter death rate as previously thought. A new study, published today in Nature Climate Change, debunks the widely held view that warmer winters will cut the number of deaths normally seen at the coldest time of year.

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