SCS student news

Current opportunities

Published: May 9, 2013 4:32:33 PM

STEM Ambassadors programme

Published: Oct 26, 2012 10:35:10 AM

Engineers Without Borders Sabbatical Opportunity

Published: Jul 10, 2012 3:53:16 PM

PhD Opportunities

Published: Jul 10, 2012 3:52:18 PM

Forensic Genomics Summer School

Published: May 24, 2012 11:37:38 AM

Student handbook

The handbook has been designed to help you by providing you with all the relevant information regarding your course. If there is anything you feel isn't covered by the handbook, please email scs@ucl.ac.uk and the admin team will update it based on your feedback.

  • Getting started: general information for new students

UCL username and password

Your UCL username and password gives you access to:

  • the UCL e-learning environment (Moodle)
  • the database which holds your student records (PORTICO)
  • your UCL email

UCL email

Your UCL email will be used as the main form of contact. If you choose not to check your email, we cannot be held responsible for any lectures or information that you miss that consequently impacts on your ability to complete the course. It is your responsibility to ensure that you check this at least twice a week.

We will have little sympathy for students who experience problems as a result of forgetting to check their email.

When you start at UCL the first thing you need to do is register your module choices. Please read A quick guide to module registration and A quick guide to PORTICO. Once you have registered your module choices via PORTICO you will automatically be enrolled on the relevant Moodle pages. Please see A quick guide to Moodle for information on UCL's e-learning environment.

A quick guide to... module registration


What is module registration?
Each MSc//MRes/PG Dip/PG Cert programme consists of a number of modules. These will consist of:

  • Taught modules (i.e. those you attend classes for)
  • A dissertation or research project (in the case of an MSc/MRes)


Each student needs to register their choice of modules for the academic year (i.e. September to September). This enables the correct fees to be charged and automatically sets up your student record so that we can input your results against the modules you have taken.

THE DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION IS 10 OCTOBER 2014


How important is this?
Vital. We cannot stress how important it is that you get this right. If you choose too few modules then you will not have taken enough credits to complete the course, if you choose too many then you will be overcharged the fees and may not be able to get a refund.

How do I know which modules to take?
See the Quick Guide to your relevant programme and the department website

How often should I register?

  • Full time students: You will register your modules just once, at the beginning of the academic year. Some courses have core modules that you will automatically be registered for at the time of enrolment. You will still need to choose your optional modules.
  • Modular flexible students: At the beginning of each academic year you need to register the modules that you are taking that academic year (i.e. September to September). How many you choose to take each academic year depends on you, but recommendations are made on the Quick Guide to your relevant course.


How do I check I’ve got it right?
If you want to check which modules you have chosen, log in to PORTICO and ‘view module selection status’, this will also tell you if your module has been confirmed by the department. N.B. departmental approval is an administrative matter and does not affect your timetable - please attend ALL lectures from the start of term even if your module selection has not been approved yet.

Once the registration period is over (usually around 21 October), you will need to look at ‘view confirmed module registration’ to see which modules you have registered for.

IF AT ANY TIME WHAT YOU SEE ON YOUR RECORD IS NOT WHAT YOU EXPECTED TO SEE, YOU MUST INFORM US IMMEDIATELY BY EMAILING scs@ucl.ac.uk

For more detailed help please view the module registration user guide

A quick guide to... PORTICO

Log in to PORTICO here


What is PORTICO?
PORTICO is the student records database. All staff and students can look at this (although with varying levels of access). It is the record of your student status and which examinations or assignments you have taken.

What’s on there?
You can access the database to view:

  • Your contact details
  • The list of modules that you have chosen to take in the current academic year
  • Modules previously taken (with assessment results once the exam boards have confirmed them)


How often should I access it?
There are a number of key periods at which you should access it:

  • Any time you want to change your contact details
  • When you want to review and check which modules you are registered for
  • When you want to see which (if any) modules you need to retake


How important is this?
Extremely. It’s not unusual for students to make mistakes when registering for modules and the department is not able to make sure that you have got everything correct.

If you don’t get it right you may not be able to complete the course, or you may be overcharged on your course fees. It is therefore sensible to periodically check PORTICO and make sure you are registered for all the modules you want to be registered, and not registered for any you didn’t think you signed up to!

A quick guide to... Moodle

Log in to Moodle here


What is Moodle?
Moodle is the e-learning environment used by UCL. Each module you take has its own Moodle page. You can read more about how it all works on the UCL wiki.

What’s on there?

  • Contact details for the module convenor (the lecturer in overall charge of the module)
  • Contact details for the module administrator
  • Module timetable and venue
  • Lecture notes and handouts
  • Module reading list (plus links to e-journals if available)
  • Assessment details
  • Access to the Turn-it-in software used to upload your electronic assignment copies


How do I enrol on the courses?
Once you have chosen and confirmed your module selection on PORTICO you will automatically be enrolled on the relevant Moodle course. Modular flexible students and full-time students with optional modules will find that the Moodle course will show up once this selection process is confirmed by the department. This may take several days.

How often should I access it?
At least once a week! This is the main point of contact for your taught courses. We no longer provide paper information. If there are late changes in the timetable we will use this facility to inform you of them so we advise you to check the day before your lectures in case there has been a change of venue for example.

How interactive is it? What if I want to ask a question about the module?
There is a news forum on each Moodle module page which all students enrolled on that module have access to. We positively encourage you to interact with your fellow students. You can start a discussion group about a topic or let people know about events related to the module topic (such as seminars or television programmes) that you think they may be interested in for example. You can even use it to ask questions about aspects of the module you may not entirely understand - often other students can help explain it in a way that makes it clear to you.

We only have two rules when posting topics:

  1. Be nice!
  2. Make sure the topic heading is sensible. “Help needed with perceptions of crime” is better than just “Help”!

Your rights and responsibilities

As a student at UCL you are entitled to expect a high standard of support. In return we hope that you will do everything possible to help us provide such support. UCL has published guidelines on students' rights and responsibilities on the Current Students website.

We recommend that all students ensure that they are familiar with the academic regulations in particular.


GUIDELINES FOR SENSITIVE INFORMATION

  1. UCL is not responsible for the actions of students and staff involved with this course. It is the students and staff responsibility to ensure that any of their activities in relation to this course fully comply with the relevant legislation.
  2. Due to the sensitive nature of this course, UCL recommends that all students make sure that all activities carried out in the context of this course are academically justified and do not give the general public access to sensitive/classified/illegal materials.
  3. Although the course content is not classified, we do not encourage you to share it with others. The materials have a copyright. They should not be made public.
  4. We strongly recommend you do not place any sensitive materials that you obtain during your study into the public domain: i.e. do NOT create a website or a blog with copies or links to terrorist materials, and do NOT share sensitive information on Facebook.

Attendance at lectures

Attendance is compulsory at all lectures and seminars for which you are timetabled. No candidate will be entered for examination/coursework assessment unless they have attended and pursued the course/programme to the satisfaction of the Department of Security and Crime Science.

A record of attendance will be kept by each of the module convenors. If you are absent/going to be absent from lectures/seminars, please email both the module convenor and the module administrator.

Dictaphone policy

You must obtain permission to record lectures by downloading and filling in this form.

The UCL Department of Security and Crime Science is the first university department in the world devoted specifically to reducing crime. It does this through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction. Our mission is to change crime policy and practice.

The department plays a pivotal role in bringing together politicians, scientists, designers and those in the front line of fighting crime to examine patterns in crime, and to find practical methods to disrupt these patterns. As such, the issue of recording lectures has a number of implications and consequences unique to the department environment that must be considered and addressed.

Given the above description, there is a significant level of participation from criminal justice (e.g. the Police Service) and policy-oriented organisations (e.g. the Ministry of Justice) in departmental modules and sessions both in the lecturing staff and the student body. As such, the material presented and discussed may be of a nature such that, whilst private, confidential discussion in the classroom is acceptable, wider dissemination is not. 

The potential consequences of such dissemination are tangible at the organisational, policy and individual levels. For example, wider dissemination of certain crime science techniques could scupper crime prevention efforts across the country. At the same time, individual practitioners are often legally bound not to make any statements that could be construed as critical of their organisation or face disciplinary action.

Thus, electronic recording can not only significantly undermine classroom discussion but also severely limit the content that can be presented. This is particularly so given the wide availability of outlets for publicly disseminating such recordings. Since recording lectures is not a right or entitlement at UCL, it is within the purview of department to prohibit electronic recording altogether on the above grounds.

However, for some disabled students, permission to record lectures is a useful adjustment which enables them to gain full advantage of a course, which might otherwise be inaccessible to them. Examples of appropriate use of recording are: when it is painful or causes discomfort for a student with a chronic medical condition to sustain handwriting even for a short period of time, for some dyslexic students who may not be able to listen, follow overheads and write at the same time, or for a student with obsessive compulsive disorder who may not be confident that s/he has taken a correct record.

Therefore, the department wishes to make every effort to assist students with these legitimate needs whilst simultaneously balancing the valid concerns of other students and its lecturing staff.  To this end, students with specific (permanent or temporary) and documented disabilities or learning needs may record lectures provided they agree to comply with the conditions and procedures outlined below.

  1. Students wishing to record lectures must sign and submit the ‘Recording Request and Declaration’ form (appendix one) prior to bringing any electronic recording equipment to a departmental lecture.  This signed declaration will be kept on file and apply to all sessions and lectures the student attends whilst enrolled for courses at UCL Department of Security and Crime Science.  Any student refusing to sign this declaration will be denied any permission to record lectures and/or sessions.
  2. Demonstrable medical need is a key component. Students requesting permission to record should be prepared to submit valid documentation demonstrating their legitimate medical need. In the case of learning or other disabilities, the student’s UCL Student Disability Services needs assessment report should specify recording lectures as part of the student’s adjustment and support plan.
  3. Since modules where different lecturers deliver the individual sessions are common within the department, students must also secure permission from the individual session lecturer to record prior to the start of each lecture and before making any recording. Lecturers retain the right to withhold permission to record, although this permission shall not be withheld capriciously.
  4. Recording a session is not a substitute for attendance and/or active participation in the session. Recording in lieu of attendance or active participation is unacceptable and unauthorized. Permission to record can be denied or withdrawn on this ground alone.
  5. Recording the lecture should not disrupt the session. If another student expresses justifiable concerns about the fact they are being recorded or has objections to audio recording taking place this can constitute a disruption for that student, particularly where participatory discussion is a significant component of the session. In such events the needs of all students concerned must be balanced and weighed by the delivering lecturer in deciding whether or not to permit recording. Permission to record will not be withheld capriciously. However, the group and lecturer may also agree upon other reasonable adjustments (for example, allowing the student access to other people’s handwritten notes). 
  6. There may be occasions where permission to record a session may be refused, such as during specific lectures. Likewise, on occasions where confidential or sensitive issues are being discussed, lecturers may insist that recording stops for that portion of the lecture. Students may also request that recording stop if they wish to make a discussion contribution that they do not want recorded. 
  7. A student authorised to record lectures must do so only for the purposes of personal study. Such students acquire no intellectual property rights in the recording or its contents whatsoever, and are absolutely prohibited from broadcasting or supplying the recording to any other person for commercial gain or otherwise except for approved transcription purposes. In other words, permission to record does not impart any intellectual property in or title to use the content other than for your own personal study. Content includes information imparted by the lecturer or session leader, as well as the views, commentary and arguments of fellow students. Feedback on lectures should be given via the normal means and it is not appropriate to use the recorded lectures as part of the feedback without the lecturer's express permission.

Any contravention of the policy will be deemed to be a disciplinary offence and the matter referred to the Dean of Students. Penalties can range from a warning or fine to, in more serious cases, suspension or even permanent exclusion from UCL.

Personal tutors and equal opportunities officer

Personal tutors

Each student in the department is allocated a personal tutor and you can view the details of your personal tutor in PORTICO. New students should expect their personal tutors to be allocated by 15 October of the new academic year. You will remain with the same personal tutor for the entire course.

If you need to contact your personal tutor, please remember to copy in the admin team using the email scs@ucl.ac.uk

Departmental Equal Opportunities Liaison Officer (DEOLO)

The role of the DEOLO is to:

  • be a local resource within the department to whom staff and students can come for information and advice
  • be the first point of contact for personal equal opportunities issues within the department.
  • assist the Head of Department with the implementation of UCL's Equal Opportunities Policies and practice at departmental level.


The DEOLO for the Department of Security and Crime Science is:

Kati Carter: k.carter@ucl.ac.uk

Student representatives

The student representatives meet with the staff three times a year to discuss any issues raised about our courses. It is a very pro-active forum and we take the comments made seriously. There will, of course, be issues that the department has no control over. But we do implement suggestions wherever possible.

If you have any questions or comments you would like your representative to raise, please let them know in advance of the meetings.

New student representatives sign up at the beginning of each academic year and their names will be added below in due course.

Staff-Student Consultative Committee meetings 2014-2015

  • Tuesday 4th November 2014 13:00 - 14:00
  • Wednesday 11th February 2015 13:00 - 14:00
  • Wednesday 13th May 2015 13:00 - 14:00

All meetings will be held in the teaching room at 35 Tavistock Square. Lunch will be provided.


Student Representatives 2014-2015

Martin Blackshaw (MSc COCT)

Camilla Brizzi (MSc CFS)

Kerry Cella (MSc CS)

Tom Hamilton (MSc CFS)

Jeff Hemmen (MRes)

Jaskaran Kaur (MSc COCT)

Ina Michelsen (MSc COCT)

Harrison Saffer (MSc CS)

Sian Smith (MRes)

Logan Stickel (MSc CS)

Rachel Weinblum (MSc COCT)*Library Rep

Student support and well-being

You can find out about the range of support services available to UCL students by watching this video.

The UCL website has a page dedicated to student welfare too.

Term dates and department access

ID cards and access

On campus, students are expected to carry their UCL ID cards at all time.

Any queries about the card should be addressed to Access Systems

Your UCL ID cards give you access to the department according to the following schedule. Please remember to carry them with you at all times:

  • MSc/Diploma/Certificate students: 8am to 6pm (Monday to Friday)
  • SECReT and research students: 5am to 11pm (all week)

Term dates 2014-15

First term: Monday 22 September 2014 - Friday 12 December 2014
Second term: Monday 12 January 2015 - Friday 27 March 2015
Third term: Monday 27 April 2015 - Friday 12 June 2015

College Reading Weeks are the weeks beginning Monday 3 November 2014, and Monday 16 February 2015. Please note that you may have lectures scheduled during reading weeks.

Careers information

  • UCL has a comprehensive and dedicated careers service which includes recruitment fairs and workshops on applying for jobs and PhDs.
  • The Engineering Faculty has a dedicated specialist careers adviser and all students are encouraged to self-enrol on their Moodle page (the enrolment key is 'careers') for information on appointments, events, mock interviews etc.
  • The department maintains its own Moodle page of events and opportunities, which lists any job vacancies, opportunities, seminars and conferences that we feel may be of interest to our students.
  • UCL Advances (The Centre for Entrepreneurship and Business Interaction at UCL) provides a range of services for postgraduate students keen to learn business-related skills while they study. You can attend guest lectures, take part in consultancy projects, and sign up for short courses.

UCL Graduate School

UCL Graduate School aims to provide support for students, particularly through its Skills Development Programme, Research Funds, Scholarships and Codes of Practice, all of which are detailed on their website.

UCL useful website links

Below you can find links to information on libraries, careers, and a wealth of other topics useful for both new and current students:

  • UCL New Students (general information on living in London and studying at UCL)
  • Quick guides to your course

MSc Countering Organised Crime and Terrorism

Please read this guide in conjunction with the information on the course structure available on the departmental website (click to access link). You will need to pay particular attention to the 'overview' and 'structure' tabs.

2014-15 academic year intake

PROGRAMME DIRECTOR

Dr Noémie Bouhana

n.bouhana@ucl.ac.uk

The MSc in Countering Organised Crime and Terrorism consists of eight taught modules (five core modules and three optional modules) and one research project.

Reading list

You can download a background reading list before you start the programme, but please be aware that this lists general texts only and you will be given a reading list for each module once you begin lectures.


CORE MODULES
Taught modules

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42)
  • Perspectives on Terrorism (PUBLGC47)
  • Perspectives on Organised Crime (PUBLGC44 )
  • Quantitative Methods (PUBLGC32)
  • Designing and Doing Research (PUBLGC31)

Research project (PUBLGC99)


OPTIONAL MODULES
Taught modules

  • Risk and Contingency Planning (PUBLGC49)
  • Investigation and Detection (PUBLGC45 )
  • Globalisation and Security (GEOGG089)
  • International Peace and Security in a Changing World (PUBLG034)
  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis (PUBLGC26)
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis (PUBLGC46)
  • Terrorism (PUBLG009)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (PUBLGC58)
  • Prevention and Disruption (PUBLGC48)

*Please note that these are modules from outside of the department and we cannot guarantee they will be available to students.

If you are interested in taking Globalisation and Security (GEOGG089) please select it on Portico as soon as possible in term one and go to the Geography department in the first week of term to register for the module. Places will be allocated on a first come first served basis so it’s important that you sign up quickly if they are interested.

Full time students

Your taught modules will run in Term one and Term two of your academic year. The research project runs throughout the academic year but the bulk of the work will be completed in Terms two and three. You will be automatically registered for your core modules and will therefore only need to choose your optional modules plus the research project.

Full time PORTICO registration requirements:
Three of the OPTIONAL taught modules

Modular-flexible students

You will take eight taught modules (five core modules and three optional modules) plus the research project over the course of your enrolment (maximum five years).

You will need to carefully consider how many modules you are able to take each term. Please bear in mind that each modules requires 15 hours a week of study time. Students typically take four modules in their first year, and four in their second year. The dissertation is completed in Year 3.

If your company is not giving you time off for study, or you are in a position of responsibility we recommend that you use the full five years to complete this degree. This would involve you taking only one taught module per term (a total of two each academic year) and completing your research project in your fifth and final year.

We strongly recommend that students take Foundations of Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42) and Perspectives on Terrorism (PUBLGC47) as their first two modules.

Modular-flexible PORTICO registration requirements:
Choose ONLY the modules you wish to take in the current academic year (ie Term one and two). 

If you are a modular-flexible student and you have any questions about module selection please contact the Programme Director, Dr Noémie Bouhana.

MSc Crime and Forensic Science

Please read this guide in conjunction with the information on the course structure available on the departmental website (click to access link). You will need to pay particular attention to the 'overview' and 'structure' tabs.

2014-15 academic year intake

PROGRAMME DIRECTOR

Dr Ruth Morgan

ruth.morgan@ucl.ac.uk

The MSc in Crime and Forensic Science consists of eight taught modules (five core modules and three optional modules) and one research project.

Suggested reading & extra-curricular activities

The following articles are suggested as useful reading before you begin your course. You will be given a reading list for each module once you begin lectures.

  • Broeders, A.P.A. (2007). 'Principles of forensic identification science'. In Newburn, T., Williamson, T. and Wright, A. (eds) Handbook of Criminal Investigation. Willan: 303-337
  • Jasanoff, S. (2006). 'Just evidence: the limits of science in the legal process'. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics, 34, 328-341

We also suggest that you make at least one visit to the Old Bailey during term 1. This is a fascinating experience, if you have never attended a court case before - and it will help you particularly if you decide to take the Crime Scene Investigation module in term 2. Information on visiting the public galleries can be found on the Central Criminal Court website.

CORE MODULES
Taught modules

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42)
  • Designing and Doing Research (PUBLGC31)
  • Quantitative Methods (PUBLGC32)
  • Interpretation of Forensic Evidence (PUBLGC57)
  • Forensic Case Assessment (PUBLGC59)*This is a late change to the programme diet

Research project (PUBLGC99)

OPTIONAL MODULES
Taught modules

  • Crime Scene Investigation (PUBLGC55)
  • Forensic Geoscience (PUBLGC56)
  • Frontiers of Experimental Physical Chemistry (CHEMGG31)
  • Structural Methods in Modern Chemistry (CHEMM005)
  • Fundamentals of Molecular Biology (BIOLG004)
  • Judgement and Decision Making (PSYCGD03)
  • Forensic Archaeology (ARCLG273)
  • Forensic Osteology (ANATG026)
  • Investigating Fraud (MSING305)*Not running in 2014-2015
  • Information Security Management (COMPGA14)

Full time students

Your taught modules will run in Term one and Term two of your academic year. The research project runs throughout the academic year but the bulk of the work will be completed in Terms two and three. You will be automatically registered for your core modules and will therefore only need to choose your optional modules plus the research project.

Full time PORTICO registration requirements:
Three of the OPTIONAL taught modules.

MSc Crime Science

Please read this guide in conjunction with the information on the course structure available on the departmental website (click to access link). You will need to pay particular attention to the 'overview' and 'structure' tabs.

2014-15 academic year intake

PROGRAMME DIRECTOR

Professor Kate Bowers

k.bowers@ucl.ac.uk

The MSc in Crime Science is composed of eight taught modules (four core modules and four optional modules) and one research project.

Reading list

You can download a background reading list before you start the programme, but please be aware that this lists general texts only and you will be given a reading list for each module once you begin lectures.

CORE MODULES
Taught modules

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42)
  • Preventing Crimes (PUBLGC43)
  • Designing and Doing Research (PUBLGC31)
  • Quantitative Methods (PUBLGC32)

Research project (PUBLGC99)

OPTIONAL MODULES
Taught modules

  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis (PUBLGC26)
  • Perspectives on Organised Crime (PUBLGC44)
  • Investigation and Detection (PUBLGC45)
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis (PUBLGC46)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (PUBLGC58)

Full time students

Your taught modules will run in Term one and Term two of your academic year. The research project runs throughout the academic year but the bulk of the work will be completed in Terms two and three. You will be automatically registered for your core modules and will therefore only need to choose your optional modules.

Full time PORTICO registration requirements:
FOUR of the OPTIONAL taught modules

Modular-flexible students

You will take eight taught modules (four core modules and four optional modules) plus the research project over the course of your enrolment (maximum five years).

You will need to carefully consider how many modules you are able to take each term. Please bear in mind that each modules requires 15 hours a week of study time. Students typically take four modules in their first year, and four in their second year. The dissertation is completed in Year 3.

If your company is not giving you time off for study, or you are in a position of responsibility we recommend that you use the full five years to complete this degree. This would involve you taking only one taught module per term (a total of two each academic year) and completing your research project in your fifth and final year.

We strongly recommend that students take Foundations of Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42) and Preventing Crimes (PUBLGC43) as their first two modules.

Modular-flexible PORTICO registration requirements:
Choose ONLY the modules you wish to take in the current academic year (ie Term one and two). 

If you are a modular-flexible student and you have any questions about module selection please contact the Programme Director, Professor Kate Bowers.

PG Dip Countering Organised Crime and Terrorism

Please read this guide in conjunction with the information on the course structure available on the departmental website (click to access link). You will need to pay particular attention to the 'overview' and 'structure' tabs.

2014-15 academic year intake

PROGRAMME DIRECTOR

Dr Noémie Bouhana

n.bouhana@ucl.ac.uk

The PG Diploma in Countering Organised Crime and Terrorism consists of eight taught modules (five core modules and three optional modules).

Reading list

You can download a background reading list before you start the programme, but please be aware that this lists general texts only and you will be given a reading list for each module once you begin lectures.CORE MODULES
Taught modules

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42)
  • Perspectives on Terrorism (PUBLGC47)
  • Perspectives on Organised Crime (PUBLG44)
  • Designing and Doing Research (PUBLGC31)
  • Quantitative Methods (PUBLGC32)

OPTIONAL MODULES
Taught modules

  • Risk and Contingency Planning (PUBLGC49)
  • Investigation and Detection (PUBLGC45 )
  • Globalisation and Security (GEOGG089)
  • International Peace and Security in a Changing World (PUBLG034)
  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis (PUBLGC26)
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis (PUBLGC46)
  • Terrorism (PUBLG009)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (PUBLGC58)
  • Prevention and Disruption (PUBLGC48)

*Please note that these are modules from outside of the department and we cannot guarantee they will be available to students.

If you are interested in taking Globalisation and Security (GEOGG089) please select it on Portico as soon as possible in term one and go to the Geography department in the first week of term to register for the module. Places will be allocated on a first come first served basis so it’s important that you sign up quickly if they are interested.

Full time students

Your taught modules will run in Term one and Term two of your academic year. You will be automatically registered for your core modules and will therefore only need to choose your optional modules.

Full time PORTICO registration requirements:
Three of the OPTIONAL taught modules

Modular-flexible students

You will take eight taught modules (five core modules and three optional modules) over the course of your enrolment (maximum five years).

You will need to carefully consider how many modules you are able to take each term. Please bear in mind that each modules requires 15 hours a week of study time. Students typically take four modules in their first year, and four in their second year.

If your company is not giving you time off for study, or you are in a position of responsibility we recommend that you use the full five years to complete this degree. This would involve you taking only one taught module per term (a total of two each academic year).

We strongly recommend that students take Foundations of Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42) and Perspectives in Organised Crime and Terrorism (PUBLGC47) as their first two modules.

Modular-flexible PORTICO registration requirements:
Choose ONLY the modules you wish to take in the current academic year (ie Term one and two).

If you are a modular-flexible student and you have any questions about module selection please contact the Programme Director, Dr Noémie Bouhana.

PG Dip Crime Science

Please read this guide in conjunction with the information on the course structure available on the departmental website (click to access link). You will need to pay particular attention to the 'overview' and 'structure' tabs.

2014-15 academic year intake

PROGRAMME DIRECTOR

Professor Kate Bowers

k.bowers@ucl.ac.uk

The PG Dip in Crime Science is composed of eight taught modules (four core modules and four optional modules).

CORE MODULES
Taught modules

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42)
  • Preventing Crimes (PUBLGC43)
  • Designing and Doing Research (PUBLGC31)
  • Quantitative Methods (PUBLGC32)

OPTIONAL MODULES
Taught modules

  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis (PUBLGC26)
  • Investigation and Detection (PUBLGC45)
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis (PUBLGC46)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (PUBLGC58)
  • Perspectives on Organised Crime (PUBLGC44)

Full time students

Your taught modules will run in Term one and Term two of your academic year. You will be automatically registered for your core modules and will therefore only need to choose your optional modules.

Full time PORTICO registration requirements:
FOUR of the OPTIONAL taught modules

Modular-flexible students

You will take eight taught modules (four core modules and four optional modules) over the course of your enrolment (maximum five years).

You will need to carefully consider how many modules you are able to take each term. Please bear in mind that each modules requires 15 hours a week of study time. Students typically take four modules in their first year, and four in their second year.

If your company is not giving you time off for study, or you are in a position of responsibility we recommend that you use at least four years to complete this degree. This would involve you taking only one taught module per term (a total of two each academic year).

We strongly recommend that students take Foundations of Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42) and Preventing Crimes (PUBLGC43) as their first two modules.

Modular-flexible PORTICO registration requirements:
Choose ONLY the modules you wish to take in the current academic year (ie Term one and two).


If you are a modular-flexible student and you have any questions about module selection please contact the Programme Director, Professor Kate Bowers.

PG Cert Security and Crime Science

Please read this guide in conjunction with the information on the course structure available on the departmental website (click to access link). You will need to pay particular attention to the 'overview' and 'structure' tabs.

2014-15 academic year intake

PROGRAMME DIRECTOR

Professor Kate Bowers

k.bowers@ucl.ac.uk

The PG Certificate in Security and Crime Science consists of four taught modules (one core module and three optional modules).

CORE MODULE

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42)

OPTIONAL MODULES

NOTE: students cannot take both PUBLGC48 and PUBLGC43

  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis (PUBLGC26)
  • Designing and Doing Research (PUBLGC31)
  • Quantitative Methods (PUBLGC32)
  • Preventing Crimes (PUBLGC43)
  • Perspectives on Organised Crime (PUBLGC44)
  • Investigation and Detection (PUBLGC45)
  • Perspectives on Terrorism (PUBLGC47)
  • Prevention and Disruption (PUBLGC48)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (PUBLGC58)

Full time students

Your taught modules will run in Term one and Term two of your academic year. You will be automatically registered for your core module and will therefore only need to choose your optional modules.

Full time PORTICO registration requirements:
Three of the OPTIONAL taught modules

Modular-flexible students

You will take four taught modules (one core modules and three optional modules) over the course of your enrolment (maximum two years).

Modular-flexible PORTICO registration requirements:
Choose ONLY the modules you wish to take in the current academic year (ie Term one and two).

If you are a modular-flexible student and you have any questions about module selection please contact the Programme Director, Professor Kate Bowers.

MRes Security Science

Please read this guide in conjunction with the information on the course structure available on the departmental website (click to access link). This will provide you with a module outline for the taught modules.

PROGRAMME DIRECTOR

Dr Hervé Borrion

h.borrion@ucl.ac.uk

The MRes in Security Science consists of six taught modules and one research project.

CORE MODULES

Taught modules

  • Foundations in Security and Crime Science (PUBLGC42A)
  • Risk and Contingency Planning (PUBLGC49)
  • Global Security Challenges (PUBLGC51)
  • Doing Research in Security Science (PUBLGC54)

Research project (PUBLGC96)

OPTIONAL MODULES

Taught modules

Students take two elective modules

For their first elective module students can choose from the following:

  • Quantitative Methods (PUBLGC32)
  • Spatial-Temporal Data Analysis and Data Mining (CEGE076)
  • Statistical Models and Data Analysis (STATG001)

For their second elective module, depending on their level of expertise in computer science, students will take one of the following modules:

  • Principles of Information Security (PUBLGC50)
  • Computer Security I
  • Computer Security II
  • Introduction to Cryptography
  • People and Security
  • Research in Information Security
  • Applied Cryptography
  • Information Security Management

Full time students

Your taught modules will run in Term one and Term two of your academic year. The research project runs throughout the academic year but the bulk of the work will be completed in Terms two and three. You will be automatically registered for your core modules and will therefore only need to choose your optional module. Please remember that you will need to contact the course convenor for your optional module to make sure that they’re happy for you to take it.



  • FAQs: Essays, coursework and dissertations

For specific details on deadlines, word counts and how to submit your essay, please go to the relevant Moodle course page. The information below is general administrative information only.

Plagiarism: what it is and why to avoid it

  1. The College is subject to the University of London's General Regulations for Internal Students and the policy detailed below has been drawn up in accordance with those Regulations.
  2. Plagiarism is defined as the presentation of another person's thoughts or words or artefacts or software as though they were a student's own.
  3. Any quotation from the published or unpublished works of other persons must, therefore, be clearly identified as such by being placed inside quotation marks, and students should identify their sources as accurately and fully as possible.
  4. A series of short quotations from several different sources, if not clearly identified as such, constitutes plagiarism just as much as does a single unacknowledged long quotation from a single source. Equally, if a student summarises another person's ideas, judgements, figures, diagrams or software, a reference to that person in the text must be made and the work referred to must be included in the bibliography.
  5. Recourse to the services of "ghost writing" agencies (for example in the preparation of essays or reports) or of outside word processing agencies which offer "correction/improvement of English" is strictly forbidden, and students who make use of the services of such agencies render themselves liable for an academic penalty.
  6. Where part of an examination consists of "take away" papers, essays or other work written in the student's own time, or a coursework assessment, the work submitted must be the candidate's own.
  7. Some departments give specific advice about non originality, plagiarism and the use of material by others, and students must make themselves aware of such departmental guidelines and abide by them. For such assessments it is also illicit to reproduce material which a student has used in other work/assessment for the course or programme concerned. Students should make themselves aware of their department's rules on this "self plagiarism". If in doubt, students should consult their Personal Tutor or an appropriate other Tutor.
  8. Failure to observe any of the provisions of this policy or of approved departmental guidelines constitutes an examination offence under the University Regulations. Examination offences will normally be treated as cheating or irregularities under the regulations for Proceedings in respect of Examination Irregularities. Under these Regulations students found to have committed an offence may be excluded from all further examinations of the University and/or the College.


You also should note that UCL has now signed up to use a sophisticated detection system (Turn-It-In) to scan work for evidence of plagiarism, and the Department intends to use this for assessed coursework.  This system gives access to billions of sources worldwide, including websites and journals, as well as work previously submitted to the Department, UCL and other universities.

Self-plagiarism

If you have previously written an essay and you use part of that essay for another piece of assessment you must still cite yourself as the author of the source, and acknowledge where the text has come from.

If an assessment enables you to address your choice of topic or to write your own essay question, then it is against Departmental regulations for you to edit a previous assessment and submit that. This is because you cannot be awarded credit for a given piece more than once.



Can I exceed the word count?

The simple answer is no.

Writing coherently to length is part of the learning process. UCL has a strict policy on overlength coursework and the Department will (and has previously) imposed penalties on students who have written over the word count or misstated the word count on their essay. We can verify the word count via the plagiarism software if necessary.

Students should therefore adhere to the prescribed word counts published by the Department for the module of study. Students are reminded that the given word count is a maximum and anything over this should be avoided.

For submitted coursework, where a maximum word count has been specified, the following procedure will apply:

  1. The length of coursework will be specified in terms of a word count or number of pages.
  2. Assessed work should not exceed the prescribed length.
  3. Assessed work with a stated word count above the prescribed word count should not be accepted for submission (i.e. it will not be date-stamped or otherwise recorded as formally submitted), but immediately returned to the student with instructions to reduce the word length. The work may then be resubmitted but the original deadline for submission still applies and penalties for late submission will be applied.
  4. For work that exceeds the upper word limit by 10% or more, a mark of zero will be recorded.
  5. For work that exceeds the upper word limit by less than 10% the mark will be reduced by ten percentage marks; but the penalised mark will not be reduced below the pass mark, assuming the work merited a pass.
  6. The method of measuring the length of coursework should be specified to students in writing.  For example, a word count will depend on the software application and a page count on the margins, font and point size.
  7. In the case of coursework that is submitted late and is also over length, only the lateness penalty will apply.

The departmental policy is that references, captions, tables, pictures and graphs are not included in the maximum word count. Appendices may be included for information only and will not be taken into consideration when the work is marked.

I'm not going to make the coursework deadline, what should I do?

UCL has a strict policy for late assignments and one which the department takes seriously. However, we understand there may be circumstances beyond your control which prevent you from handing work in on time.

Students are expected to plan their time sensibly, and take appropriate precautions to back-up and safe-guard their work. In most cases, computer failures, virus infections or similar will therefore not be regarded as sufficient excuse for late submission.

If you cannot hand your work in on time, you must take the following steps:

  • Contact the course administrator and your personal tutor before the deadline to inform them of your circumstances
  • Submit an extenuating circumstances form within three working days of the deadline. Failure to submit a form in this time-frame will result in deductions being made from your final mark
  • The extenuating circumstances form must include supporting documentation such as a medical certificate, doctor's note or letter from your work. Failure to include supporting documentation will result in deductions being made from your final mark.

You must also read the FAQ on extenuating circumstances (FAQ below) which includes further information and a link to the form.

Penalties for late submission of assignments, essays and dissertations

Late submission of essays or assignments (without extenuating circumstances) can result in deduction of marks according to the following schedule: 

  1. The full allocated mark should be reduced by five percentage points for the first day after the deadline for the submission of the coursework.
  2. The mark will be reduced by a further ten percentage points (to 15 percentage points) if the coursework is submitted during the following six days.
  3. A mark of zero should be recorded for coursework submitted on calendar day 8 after the deadline through to the end of the second week of the third term.  Nevertheless, the assessment will be considered to be complete provided the coursework contains material that can be assessed.
  4. Coursework submitted after the end of the second week of the third term will not be marked and the assessment will be incomplete.
  5. Coursework submitted after solutions have been released will receive a mark of zero, and may not be formally marked, even when the coursework was submitted within seven calendar days of the deadline.  Nevertheless, the assessment will be considered to be complete provided the coursework contains material that can be assessed. 
  6. In the case of dissertations and project reports submitted more than seven days late, the mark will be recorded as zero but the assessment would be considered to be complete.
  7. Where there are extenuating circumstances that have been recognised by the Board of Examiners or its representative, these penalties will not apply until the agreed extension period has been exceeded.
  8. In the case of coursework that is submitted late and is also over length, only the lateness penalty will apply.

There is an Extenuating Circumstances Board convened in July of each year which takes into consideration the late submission of coursework and any extenuating circumstances. It is that this meeting that penalties (if appropriate) will be applied. Any extenuating circumstances must be commensurate with the date the work was handed in or a penalty will apply.

What are extenuating circumstances?

We understand that there may be circumstances which make it difficult for you to complete an assignment, or which you feel have a bearing on the quality of your work. UCL terms these 'extenuating circumstances' and has a policy in place to consider these when it comes to marking your work. They can include (but are not limited to) situations such as unexpected work commitments or illness of yourself or a close relative.

  • Extenuating circumstances and late assignments

If your extenuating circumstances coincide with an assignment deadline, then you must inform the course administrator and your personal tutor immediately (for the full procedure see the FAQ on coursework deadlines above).

If your extenuating circumstances mean that you have to hand your work in later than the deadline, you must complete and hand in the extenuating circumstances form no later than three working days after the deadline in order to avoid any late coursework penalties. 

You should then hand your coursework in as soon as you are able.

Please note however that completion of the form does not guarantee that you will avoid these penalties, we must be convinced that the situation was serious enough to affect your ability to hand your work in on time.

We have a Board meeting in July of each academic year to consider whether your extenuating circumstances justify ignoring the late coursework penalties. During this meeting we take into account the severity of the circumstances, the supporting evidence and the number of days after the deadline the work was handed in. Any extenuating circumstances must be commensurate with the date the work was handed in or a penalty will apply.

  • Extenuating circumstances and quality of work

If you believe you have extenuating circumstances that affected the quality of your work (whether assignments or exams), then you must inform the course administrator and your personal tutor immediately.

You must complete and hand in an extenuating circumstances form no later than three working days after the deadline or exam date in order for us to be able to consider your case.

Although we are unable to increase marks because of extenuating circumstances, if you are a borderline pass/fail, pass/merit or pass/distinction your circumstances will be taken into consideration at the board meeting at which your degree is awarded.

Download the extenuating circumstances form here.

What do the essay grades mean?

When your coursework is returned to you, you will not be given a numerical mark, this is because marks can only be finalised at the Exam Board, which is usually held in July. Instead you are graded according to the scheme below.

Essay grading scheme

  • Grade F (Fail)     0-49%

At the lower end of this category the answer will display no apparent relevance to, or understanding of, the question, and demonstrate that the student has failed to gain a command over basic scholarly skills.  At the higher end of this category a very limited understanding may be provided but the answer will present little evidence of relevant knowledge or reading, contain many mistakes, irrelevancies or misunderstandings, and/or be badly organised and/or unclearly expressed.

  • Grade C              50-59% (C+ will be awarded if the provisional mark is 55-59%)

Answers will achieve lower pass marks if they show a general understanding of the question but also display one or more of the following: poor organisation; lack of clarity in expression; limited critical ability; inadequate evidence of appropriate reading; and inadequacies in presentation.  Evidence will be provided of essential scholarly skills, including some ability to construct an argument supported by adequate citation and bibliography, and the ability to meet deadlines and word-limits.

  • Grade B              60-69% (B+ will be awarded if the provisional mark is 65-69%)

Answers that show good understanding, are well organised, clearly expressed and display evidence of appropriate reading will gain high pass marks.  Students must demonstrate a familiarity with current literature in their areas of specialisation, and must develop a critical position with reference to the relevant texts and/or scholarly literature.  Ability to construct a critical argument supported by adequate and accurate citations and bibliography will be demonstrated, and all presentational requirements will have been met.

  • Grade A (Distinction) 70-100%

If, in addition to lesser criteria, an answer shows one or more of the following it will achieve a mark of distinction: exceptional thoroughness and clarity in the presentation of the answer; exceptional enterprise in reading; exceptional insight or originality in the use of primary sources and relevant evidence; outstanding critical ability or unusually clear perception in suggesting future research.

When will I get my marks back?

Essays and coursework

Students will receive their grades approximately four weeks after the deadline, although this will vary in instances where the deadline falls just before a university holiday (for example Christmas or Easter).

Numerical marks

The Department will not communicate your numerical marks but they will be available on PORTICO around December of the academic year after you took the module. For example, if you take the module in the academic year 2013-2014, they will be available in December 2014. The exact date will depend on the speed at which UCL Examinations are able to process the marks.

Dissertations

Dissertation marks will be available on PORTICO along with taught module marks around December of the academic year after you took the module (see above).

Overall programme award

Your overall programme award will be available on PORTICO around December of the academic year after you completed the programme (as above). You will be awarded either a Fail, Pass, Pass with Merit or Pass with Distinction.

I'd like to appeal a grade, what is the process?

If you feel that the grade that you receive on your essay is unfair, please contact the module administrator and let them know why.

The module administrator will then inform the module convenor of your reasons. The module convenor will either contact you to explain the decision, or recommend that the assignment is passed on to the external examiner.

The external examiner will then consider your assignment and the suitability of the mark(s) at the exam board in July.

I've failed a module, what happens now?

Failing a module does not mean that you have failed the course. UCL regulations allow candidates to resit failed modules. In some instances the relevant exam board may be able to condone the fail (called a condoned pass) but this is not an automatic entitlement.

Retaking failed modules
  • Candidates who have been unsuccessful at the first attempt may retake the assessment (e.g. essay) on one occasion.
  • Save in very exceptional circumstances, reassessment will be in the year following the first attempt.
  • Retaking candidates will only be eligible for a pass for their overall degree.
  • We strongly recommend that modular flexible students who need to retake module(s) in any academic year reduce the number of new modules they register for in the same academic year to reduce stress and workload.
Studying for retakes

It is at the discretion of the department to allow students to sit in on lectures for modules they are retaking. If you are allowed to sit in please note that you will be assessed on the module content you were taught the first time you took the module so we advise you to discuss this with the module convenor to avoid any confusion. You can access the teaching notes and slides for the year you took the module via the Moodle archive.

You do not need to register your retakes on PORTICO, this will be done automatically for you. For essays and other coursework, you will be contacted by the admin team during the academic year following your first attempt with the reassessment and submission guidelines.

Condoned pass

In some instances, students who have received above 40% but below 50% in their taught modules (NOT the dissertation) will be eligible for a condoned pass. Please refer to the assessment rules for your course for further information.

There are several points to note:

  • This is at the discretion of the exam board.
  • This is only available for taught modules and does not apply to the dissertation.
  • Modular flexible students can only be granted condoned passes in their final year. Prior to that, they must retake the modules.
  • We will give you the choice of resitting the module or being given a condoned pass after the final exam board has sat (usually in November).

Where can I find examples of previous dissertations and research projects?

The Department retains a couple of example dissertations and research projects for students to look at, but for reasons of confidentiality and intellectual property we are not able to offer open access to all previous dissertations.

The research projects that we do have are stored in the Departmental library.

PLEASE NOTE that these must not be taken away and are for reference only.

  • FAQs: Examinations

For specific details on exam dates and venues, please go to the relevant Moodle course page. The information below is general administrative information only.

Where can I get past exam papers?

On each module page on Moodle there is a link on the right-hand side to the repository of past exam papers.

Please note that some of the modules are quite new and so there are only limited papers available.

When will we know the dates of our exams?

The examination timetable is published at the end of March. The examination period is any time from the end of April to the middle of June. We do not advise students to organise holidays during this time. The department is unable to choose when the exams take place as they are organised centrally by UCL Examinations. UCL Examinations will inform students of the timings and locations of their exams.

We realise this uncertainty can cause problems for modular flexible students but unfortunately are unable to do anything about this.

I cannot attend an exam, what should I do?

The most important thing you need to know is that timing is critical. The more notice you give us of your circumstances the more we can do for you. If you fail to give us sufficient notice and consequently do not attend an exam you will be marked as absent and receive a mark of 0 (zero) for that module.


This does not mean you will automatically fail the course. Assuming that this is your first attempt at the module you will be able to resit the assessment the next academic year.

If you know when the exam dates are published that you are unable to take an exam you must contact the module administrator and your personal tutor immediately. If you do not contact them and do not attend the exam you will be marked as absent and receive a mark of 0 (zero).

If a situation arises after the exam dates are published which means you will not be able to attend an exam, you must contact the module administrator and your personal tutor immediately. If you do not contact them and do not attend the exam you will be marked as absent and receive a mark of 0 (zero).

If a situation arises on the day of the exam then you must contact the module administrator and your personal tutor within five days of the exam date. If you do not contact them in this time-frame you will be marked as absent and receive a mark of 0 (zero).



Personal circumstances meant I didn't perform as well as I'd wanted, what are my options?

We understand that there may be circumstances which you feel have a bearing on the quality of your work. UCL terms these 'extenuating circumstances' and has a policy in place to consider these when it comes to marking your work. They can include (but are not limited to) situations such as unexpected work commitments or illness of yourself or a close relative.

  • Extenuating circumstances and quality of work

If you believe you have extenuating circumstances that affected the quality of your work in an exam, then you must inform the module administrator and your personal tutor immediately.

You must complete and hand in an extenuating circumstances form no later than three working days after the exam date in order for us to be able to consider your case.

Although we are unable to increase marks because of extenuating circumstances, if you are a borderline pass/fail, pass/merit or pass/distinction your circumstances will be taken into consideration at the board meeting at which your degree is awarded.

Download the extenuating circumstances form

When will I get my marks back?

Examinations

Students will be informed if they have passed their exams after the taught module exam board has sat, usually around the middle of August in the academic year in which you sat them. You will receive the results in the form of Fail, Pass or Pass with Distinction (Fail = 49 or below, Pass = 50 - 69, Pass with Distinction = 70 or above).

Numerical marks

The Department will not communicate your numerical marks but they will be available on PORTICO around December of the academic year after you took the module. For example, if you take the module in the academic year 2013-2014, they will be available in December 2014. The exact date will depend on the speed at which UCL Examinations are able to process the marks.

Overall programme award

Your overall programme award will be available on PORTICO
around December of the academic year after you completed the programme
(as above). You will be awarded either a Fail, Pass, Pass with Merit or
Pass with Distinction if you are taking the MRes, MSc or PG Diploma. Certificate students will be awarded either a Fail or a Pass.

I've failed a module, what happens now?

Failing a module does not mean that you have failed the course. UCL regulations allow candidates to resit failed modules. In some instances the relevant exam board may be able to condone the fail (called a condoned pass) but this is not an automatic entitlement.

Retaking failed modules
  • Candidates who have been unsuccessful at the first attempt may resit the examination on one occasion.
  • Save in very exceptional circumstances, reassessment will be in the year following the first attempt. 
  • Retaking candidates will only be eligible for a pass for their overall degree.
  • We strongly recommend that modular flexible students who need to retake module(s) in any academic year reduce the number of new modules they register for in the same academic year to reduce stress and workload.
Studying for retakes

It is at the discretion of the department to allow students to sit in on lectures for modules they are retaking. If you are allowed to sit in please note that you will be assessed on the module content you were taught the first time you took the module so we advise you to discuss this with the module convenor to avoid any confusion. You can access the teaching notes and slides for the year you took the module via the Moodle archive.

You do not need to register your retakes on PORTICO as this will be done automatically for you.

In all cases, your resit mark will be taken as the final mark, even if your original mark is higher.
Condoned pass

In some instances, students who have received above 40% but below 50% in their taught modules (NOT the dissertation) will be eligible for a condoned pass. Please refer to the assessment rules for your course for further information.

There are several points to note:

  • This is only available for taught modules and does not apply to the dissertation.
  • Modular flexible students can only be granted condoned passes in their final year. Prior to that, they must retake the modules.
  • We may give you the choice of retaking the module or being given a condoned pass after the exam board has sat (usually in November).


Towards the end of the first term in the year following your examinations, UCL Examinations will write to you and ask if you wish to be re-entered for the exams which you have failed. If you do not wish to resit an examination, and that examination counts for 100% of the assessment and you are eligible for a condoned pass, UCL Examinations will note that you have been given a condoned pass for that module. Please be aware that if you opt for this it cannot be reversed. If you wish not to resit an examination you are advised to discuss this with your personal tutor before responding to UCL examinations. If you choose not to retake one module, then you can only receive one further condoned pass. If you choose not to retake two modules, then you must pass all remaining modules.

If you elect to resit all failed examinations and then subsequently elect not to sit that examination (because, for example, you have calculated that you could receive a condoned pass) you must formally withdraw from the examination by contacting UCL Examinations at least two weeks before your first exam. Failure to do so will mean that you are marked as absent and will fail that module with a mark of 0 (zero). We will not then be able to grant you a condoned pass.

Any questions?

If you cannot find the answer to your question above, please use the following contacts.

If your question is about an administrative process:

For Crime Science or Countering Crime and Terrorism students:
MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate students: scs@ucl.ac.uk (Administrator: Rebecca Alexander)

MSc Crime and Forensic Science students: scs@ucl.ac.uk (Administrator: Kirstie Hampson)

MRes Security Science students: scs@ucl.ac.uk (Administrator: Amy Clemens)

If your question is about a module on the course:

For example not being able to attend a lecture, or having a problem with the module content.

Please contact the module convenor/administrator. You can find their details on the relevant Moodle pages.

If your question is about the overall programme:

Please contact the relevant programme convenor.

MSc, PG Diploma in Crime Science, PG Certificate in Security & Crime Science: Professor Kate Bowers k.bowers@ucl.ac.uk

MSc, PG Diploma in Countering Organised Crime and Terrorism: Dr Noemie Bouhana n.bouhana@ucl.ac.uk

MSc Crime and Forensic Science: Dr Ruth Morgan ruth.morgan@ucl.ac.uk

MRes Security Science: Dr Herve Borrion h.borrion@ucl.ac.uk

If your question is about a personal issue or problems that you are having with attending classes:

Please contact your personal tutor (details can be found on PORTICO) and copy in scs@ucl.ac.uk to any emails.

Page last modified on 21 aug 13 10:24