Memory and Literature in a Globalised Culture

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MA option presented by

UCL Center for Intercultural Studies, MA in Comparative Literature & UCL Department of Scandinavian Studies

In collaboration with University of Aarhus, MA in Comparative Literature

Course Code: CLITG004
Credits: 20
Term: Spring 2010

Monday: 14-16 (2pm - 4pm, UK time)

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Course Links:

Visit the tutor's blog

Visit the 2009 students' blog


Visit the course on Moodle (key required)


Visit the course on the UCL Wiki (key required)


Meet the tutor at AU

Meet the tutor at UCL

Visit Comparative Literature at Aarhus University, Denmark.


Visit Comparative Literature at University College London, UK

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memory and literature banner

The UCL Centre for Intercultural Studies and the Comparative Literature MA launched a new module in the Spring term of 2009 entitled "Memory and Literature in a Globalised Culture." Interested MA and PhD students in London and Aarhus are invited to participate in the module, for its second running in the Spring of 2010.

This is an innovative course in many respects. Firstly, the course investigates the role of memory in an age of globalisation with examples drawn from a range of literatures, media and cultural artifacts. Secondly, the course, in its delivery, is of a transnational nature: most sessions are conducted in video-conference with a parallel course running at the University of Aarhus. And lastly, students are given the opportunity to work with materials of their own finding, to discuss and present individual projects in local and transnational groups. "

memory course video conference

(a view into our transnational seminar room seen from the UCL Access Grid. The Interactive Whiteboard to the left, students in the Danish seminar room to the right)

Memory and Literature in a Globalised Culture" is, then, an excellent opportunity for MA and research students from a variety of disciplines and programmes who want to explore the ways in which globalisation has challenged the content and function of collective memory, how national cultures and literary canons have circumscribed collective memory and how new media co-operate with literature in shaping memories and identities.

The group will meet once a week for a two-hour session in the Spring term of 2010, and there will be arranged online-study-groups on a biweekly basis. The seminars will introduce students to current theories and discussions of memory, literature and globalisation, and three common primary texts will be discussed in that context. In 2009 we discussed Jorge Semprúns novel The Long Voyage (1963), Gonzáles Iñárritu’s film Babel (2006) and the commemoration of the discovery of America in the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago (1893). These or similar texts will form the basis of the 2010 seminars.

If you would like to know more, to express your interest in or secure a place on the course, please contact the module tutor, Dr. Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen (j.stougaard-nielsen@ucl.ac.uk)

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NEWS:

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> Students who wish to join the 2010 version of the option are encouraged to attend the Transcultural Memory Conference at University of London. The conference takes place on February 5-6 2010.

> The course is presently negotiating with University of Lisbon to include Portuguese students of Comparative Literature in our 2010 seminar.

> The seminar of 2009 was followed by Dr. Federica Mazzara (UCL Mellon Postgraduate Fellow) who investigated the course as part of her studies in teaching and learning at CALT. Read the report in full here.

> The UCL tutor, Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen, received a UCL Provost's Teaching Award partly for his contribution to creating and running this module.

> The first run of the seminar has ended succesfully with students writing and publishing their academic hypertexts on genocide in Kampotchea, sleep in literature and the function of vikings in the construction of a Danish national memory.

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