Contact IRDR

Email: irdr-enquiries@ucl.ac.uk

Phone: 02031081101

Ext: 51101

Office location: Rm 38, 2nd floor, South Wing, UCL Main Quadrangle

IRDR Taught Programmes

Rescue Global Masters Students

Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. UCL’s Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR) offers programmes with taught and research components which aim to meet the growing need for experts trained to analyse and provide solutions to complex issues.

Our Programmes

In all our programmes students explore the characterisation, quantification, management and reduction of risk and disasters, along with their associated impacts, from a diverse range of scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives. 

Students acquire advanced levels of knowledge of empirical, theoretical, and practical aspects of risk, disaster and resilience. This knowledge and skill is applied during their research with the opportunity to further hone communication skills when presenting their research.

Teaching and project supervision in provided by active researchers, practitioners and policy-makers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields. The IRDR leads cross-disciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching across UCL with engagement from over 70 academics across 12 departments and 7 faculties.

Our students develop core competencies and understanding studying 4 core modules which span all our programmes:

Core skills modules in all programmes:

Each of our programmes consist of tailored modules so our students develop specialisms in risk disaster and resilience: risk and disaster reduction or risk and disaster science. Personal preferences and interests may be developed within each programme through a range of optional modules available.  



*NEW* Risk and Disaster Science Programmes *NEW*

In these programmes students focus on the science behind disasters and how this information is used by stakeholders. The focus of these programmes is on physical sciences, supplemented by modules that focus on integrating this knowledge into disaster risk reduction, how to manage emergency and crisis situations, scenarios and tools for research in this field. Optional modules allow students to focus on particular hazards and risks.

These programmes suit those wanting to focus on physical science while adopting a more holistic and multi-disciplinary approach to risk and disaster reduction through gaining a better understanding of different approaches and mindsets to increase resilience and decrease the negative impacts of disasters.

MSc in Risk and Disaster Science

Director: Professor Peter Sammonds

Duration: full-time 1 year; part time 2 years (starts 2016-17)

Fees: UK/EU 2016/2017 £9,020 (FT), £4,510 (PT); Overseas 2016/2017 £23,020 (FT), £11,460 (PT). 

This course is suitable for students who want to have a wide range of taught courses, whilst still completing a substantial independent project. The taught courses are the focus of the programme, with the project constituting one third of the programme credits. 
MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits: four compulsory core taught modules (15 credits each), two compulsory taught skills modules (15 credits), two optional taught modules (15 credits each), and an independent research project (60 credits).

Two core taught modules (15 credits each):

Two compulsory taught skills modules (15 credits each):

Two programme-specific core modules (15 credits each):

Independent Project (60 credits):

Two optional taught modules: Please note spaces on optional models are restricted so students' preferred choices may not be possible.

* These modules may require some prerequisites. Please contact the module tutors for details. 

PG Dip in Risk and Disaster Science

Director: Professor Peter Sammonds

Duration: full-time 1 year; part time 2 years (starts 2016-17)

Fees: UK/EU 2016/2017 £6,045 (FT), £3,025 (PT); Overseas 2016/2017 £15,590 (FT), £7,695 (PT). 

This course is suitable for students who want to have a wide range of taught courses, with a strong science focus without completing an independent project. 

PGDip students undertake modules to the value of 120 credits: four compulsory core taught modules (15 credits each), two compulsory taught skills module and two optional taught modules (15 credits each).

Two Core Taught Modules:

Two Taught Skills Module:

Two programme-specific core modules:

Two optional taught modules can be chosen from within the following subjects:

Please note spaces on optional modules are restricted so students' preferred choices may not be possible.

*These modules may require some pre-requisites. Please contact the module tutors for details. 


Risk, Disaster and Resilience Programmes

In these multidisciplinary programmes students acquire a broad overview of different hazards and approaches to risk and disaster reduction and tools for research in this field. Students learn how this knowledge affects decision-making and the different approaches to applying and implementing this in order to achieve risk and disaster reduction. Emergency and crisis planning and management is taught, from creating business continuity plans through to developing emergency management plans and using them along with testing their efficacy and making improvements using scenarios. Optional modules allow student to focus on particular risks.

These programmes are designed to teach students about disasters from both a social and physical sciences perspective. By gaining a thorough understanding of different approaches and mindsets, students are able to adopt a more holistic approach to risk and disaster reduction whether they specialize in one discipline or have a multidisciplinary focus in order to improve resilience and decrease the negative impact of disasters.

MSc in Risk, Disaster and Resilience

Director: Dr Joanna Faure Walker

Duration: full-time 1 year; part time 2 years

Fees: UK/EU 2016/2017 £9,020 (FT), £4,510 (PT); Overseas 2016/2017 £25,140 (FT), £12,310 (PT).

This course is suitable for students who want to have a wide range of taught courses, whilst still completing a substantial independent project. The taught courses are the focus of the programme, with the project constituting one third of the programme credits.
MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits: four compulsory core taught modules (15 credits each), two compulsory taught skills modules and two optional taught modules (15 credits each), and an independent research project (60 credits).

Two Core Taught Modules:

Two Taught Skills Modules:

Two Programme-Specific Core Modules:

Two optional taught modules can be chosen from within the following subjects:

*Please note there may be restrictions on optional modules available.

The dissertation project comprises 1/3 of this course. Supervisors and resources are available for projects in a wide range of risk, disaster and resilience topics. This project culminates in a research report and poster.

*Please note the availability of particular optional modules can vary and cannot be guaranteed.

"The programme was easily tailored to individual requirements. It had core risk modules plus a wide selection of modules which allowed me to focus on humanitarianism, whilst others for example, focused on climate change or business continuity."  Adam McVie, 2014 Alumnus

PG Dip in Risk, Disaster and Resilience

Director: Dr Joanna Faure Walker

Duration: full-time 1 year; part time 2 years

Fees: UK/EU 2016/2017 £6,045 (FT), £3,025(PT); Overseas 2016/2017 £16,130 (FT), £8,225 (PT).

This programme contains the same taught courses as the MSc, but no independent research project. Please apply via the MSc graduate prospectus page.

PG-Dip students undertake modules to the value of 120 credits: four compulsory core taught modules (15 credits each), two compulsory taught skills modules and two optional taught modules (15 credits each).


Two Core Taught Modules:

Two Taught Skills Modules:

Two Programme-Specific Core Modules:

Two optional taught modules can be chosen from within the following subjects*:

  • Urban Planning for Disasters and Climate Change
  • Social Vulnerability and Resilience to Disasters
  • Decision Making and Statistics of risk
  • Post Disaster Recovery
  • Terrorism, Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
  • Seismic Hazard and Risk

*Please note the availability of particular optional modules can vary and cannot be guaranteed.


Risk and Disaster Reduction Programmes

In these programmes students adopt a multidisciplinary approach to risk and disaster reduction. Students acquire a broad overview of different hazards, how this affects decision-making, different approaches to implementing this information in decision-making and how to plan and manage emergency and crisis scenarios.

These programmes teach students about disasters from both a social science and physical science perspective. This helps those wanting to continue with a multidisciplinary approach and those wishing to specialize in one discipline to adopt a more holistic approach to risk and disaster reduction through gaining a better understanding of different approaches and mindsets within this field.

MRes in Risk and Disaster Reduction

Director: Professor David Alexander

Duration: full-time 1 year; part time 2 years

Fees: UK/EU 2016/2017 £9,020 (FT), £4,510 (PT); Overseas 2016/2017 £23,020 (FT), £11,460 (PT).

MRes students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits: three optional taught core modules (15 credits each), two taught skills modules (15 credits each), and a substantial independent research project (105 credits). The programme may be completed as a stand-alone MRes or it may be used as training towards subsequent completion of a PhD.

Two core taught modules:

Two taught skills modules will be taken:

Two programme-specific core modules:

The dissertation project and the research appraisal and proposal module comprise 2/3 of this course, so is a substantial project. Supervisors and resources are available for projects in a wide range of risk and disaster reduction topics. This project culminates in an independent report and presentation. 

PG-Cert in Risk, and Disaster Reduction

Director: Dr Joanna Faure Walker

Duration: part time 1 year

Fees: UK/EU 2016/2017 £4,510 (FT); Overseas 2016/2017 £11,090 (FT).

PG-Cert students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits: the four IRDR core taught modules (15 credits each). The programme may be completed as a stand-alone PG-Cert, or it may be used as a stepping stone towards subsequent completion of a PGDip or Masters.

Two Core Taught Modules:

Two Programme-Specific Core Modules:


For further information on all of these courses please download the IRDR postgraduate prospectus:

Apply

Applications for our courses must be done through the main UCL application system. Instructions and advice for applying to our courses can be found here:

Applying for IRDR Taught Postgraduate Programmes

Please note, the deadline for applications with a September 2016 start is 17:00GMT 29 July 2016.

Further information

If you would like further information about the IRDR post-graduate courses or wish to discuss the application procedure please contact rosanna.smith@ucl.ac.uk

We look forward to hearing from you.

Funding

UCL offers approximately 340 awards of £10,000 each to Master’s students starting their studies in September 2016. The aim of this scheme is to encourage students from under-represented groups to embark on a postgraduate qualification and is funded jointly by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and UCL.

This is a one-off opportunity for those applying to study a postgraduate taught programme starting in September 2016 only. To be eligible to apply for an award, candidates must meet all the eligibility criteria. The Postgraduate Support Scheme is a discretionary fund that is expected to generate high demand, so there is no guarantee of funding upon application.

Eligibility criteria

To be considered for an award, candidates must:

· have applied by the date of the scholarship application deadline to study a postgraduate taught (Master's) degree at UCL beginning in 2016/17. All subjects are eligible. Postgraduate Certificates, Postgraduate Diplomas, and research programmes are not eligible;

· be progressing from an undergraduate degree programme for which they were charged the higher tuition fee rate introduced in 2012/13 (i.e. those who started their undergraduate programmes from September 2012);

· be studying full-time, or if part-time, up to a maximum of two years;

· be domiciled in the UK or European Union (EU);

· be from a group that is under-represented among the UCL’s taught postgraduate (Master’s) population.

At UCL priority will be given to students from the following groups:

· those with household incomes of less than £25,000 (assessment will be based on previous Student Loans Company entitlement (e.g. evidence of previous grant/bursary awards), and where necessary evidence of parental household income);

· those with a disability;

· care leavers;

· students with childcare or (registered) carer responsibilities.

Application

The deadline for submitting completed applications is Friday, 29 July 2016 at 23:59 (UTC). For information on how to apply and to download application materials, please visit the UCL Scholarships and Funding website (under the “Postgraduate Support Scheme” tab).

Prog. Types

All the post-graduate programmes are centered around IRDR core taught modules.

The main differences between the programmes are the total number of credits needed, the number of taught modules taken and whether there is an independent research project.

Masters of Science (MSc) and Research (MRes) Programmes

MSc and MRes students undertake the equivalent of a full year of study. All of our masters programmes include an independent research project.

The MSc programmes are suitable for students who want to have a wide range of taught courses and do an independent research project which constitutes about one third of students’ time.

For MRes students’ the dissertation is the focus of the programme, with taught modules designed to support their learning and development. The MRes programme is ideal for students wanting to complete a considerable piece of research, possibly as training for a research career or for furthering their existing career.

Post-Graduate Diploma (PGDip) and Certificate (PGCert) Programmes

These programmes comprise of taught courses with no independent research project. These programmes are aimed at students to want to increase their knowledge and are looking for courses with less of a time commitment than a masters.

PGCert students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits: the four IRDR core taught modules (15 credits each). The programme may be completed as a stand-alone PG-Cert, or it may be used as a stepping-stone towards subsequent completion of a PGDip, which contains twice as many modules, or Masters.

Taught Modules

lRDR post-graduate programmes are based on core taught institute, programme and skills modules. These vary between programmes so please check the individual programme information before applying.

IRDR Taught Modules:


IRDR Taught Skills Courses:

Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools

Research Proposal and Appraisal


Additional Courses taught in partner departments:

*Please note the availability of particular optional modules can vary and cannot be guaranteed*

  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change
  • Climate Risks to Hydro-ecological Systems
  • Decision and Risk
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Earthquake Seismology and Earthquake Hazards
  • Natural Hazards, Social Vulnerability and Disaster Risk Management
  • Perspectives on Terrorism
  • Post Disaster Recovery
  • Risk, Power and Uncertainty
  • Risk and Contingency Planning
  • Seismic Risk Assessment
  • Statistical Computing

Learning

The programmes are delivered through a combination of lectures, practicals, field visits, directed reading, problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event. There is an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers.

Guest lecturers from within the university, from NGOs and industry provide additional expertise and practical experience and knowledge which they share with the students. 

Various day field trips are available among IRDR compulsory and optional modules. These can vary, but may include the following:

  • Cambridge flood tour
  • Thames Barrier and London disasters
  • Rescue Global Disaster Simulation
  • Royal National Lifeboat Institute
  • Met Office Space Weather Operations Centre

Student assessment is conducted by a combination of independent and group oral presentations, written examinations, coursework essays, and the independent project.

Practical application of critical and creative problem solving is encouraged and assessed throughout.

Careers

Our programmes provide excellent training towards careers in research, research communication, public policy, (re)insurance, catastrophe modeling, risk management, international development, humanitarian assistance, engineering and many other fields.

It offers research training for professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction.

We run an annual careers and opportunities fair for students and graduates.

adam quote


After graduating I worked as a natural hazards consultant.  I have continued to develop my career in the humanitarian field next working for an INGO as an emergencies assistant and more recently as a preparedness programme officer, working on communicable disease preparedness in West Africa and general disaster preparedness for the Start Network.” Adam McVie, MSc Risk, Disaster and Resilience alumnus


Why IRDR

Natural disasters destroy lives and damage economies across the globe; pandemics have the potential to bring suffering on an unprecedented scale; industrial disasters can cause regional environmental damage; climate change increases the risks to water and food security; while multiple hazards may interact to deliver unforeseen consequences.

UCL IRDR is uniquely well-placed to lead research and teaching in risk and disaster reduction (RDR).  The IRDR provides: 

- A physical hub for UCL’s RDR activities, located in the South Win on the main UCL Bloomsbury campus.

- An intellectual hub, organising IRDR forums, high profile public events and exhibitions, and an annual conference.

- Expert analysis.

- Knowledge exchange through building long-term international partnerships, publishing high impact reports and engaging with the media.

- Support for student engagement.

- A gateway to UCL’s broad RDR activities and teaching portal.

We work to understand how society sees risk, how to link understanding of the causative mechanics to statistical approaches, and how to increase resilience and reduce the risk of disasters are common themes cutting across research in natural, environmental, health and technological hazards. We actively work in co-ordination and collaboration to tackle the global challenge of reducing global risks and disasters and maximise our impact through cross-disciplinary cooperation. 

Why UCL?

FAQs

(1) Are there any possibilities for help with funding?

UCL offers a range of financial awards aimed at assisting both prospective and current students with their studies. The searchable database can be found here.

UCL also attracts students who have received funding from their own government or other external sources, so prospective applicants are advised to check with the Ministry of Education in their own country or from the British Council for information about other potential funding opportunities.

Current and past students have received Chevening Scholarships to attend the course. The scheme is aimed at developing global leaders and is funded by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and partner organisations. For further information please visit their website.

(2) Is there an English language requirement?

Yes – there is a minimum requirement. Further details can be found here:

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements

UCL Centre for Languages & International Education (CLIE) also offer a number of English language courses including:

· Pre-Master’s course

CLIE also offers a number of part-time academic English courses to support your time at UCL.

These courses are aimed at enhancing English language skills and overall confidence and are offered during the three academic terms. Courses include: Academic Reading, Pronunciation & Public Speaking, Advanced Grammar and Academic Writing.