UCL Institute for Risk & Disaster Reduction


IRDR News

Hand-tubewell at a school in coastal Bangladesh

Focus on the Positive

Published: Feb 24, 2014 3:30:38 PM

Poster presentations and reception at the Workshop on Disaster Research

UK - Japan Symposium and Workshop on Disasters

Published: Jan 8, 2014 2:45:50 PM

After Fukushima: risk and resilience to disasters in Japan

Published: Dec 16, 2013 11:07:36 AM



Contact IRDR

Email: irdr-enquiries@ucl.ac.uk

Phone: 02031081101

Ext: 51101

Office location: Rm 38, 2nd floor, South Wing, UCL Main Quadrangle

Luke Wedmore

PhD student

Title: Assessing seismic hazard in central Italy from rates of slip and earthquake recurrence through geophysical and geodetic measurements
Supervisors: Joanna Faure Walker (IRDR)
Source(s) of funding: UCL Impact, IRDR, Geospatial Research Limited (Durham)
Address: UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT
Phone No: 020 3108 1107
Extension: 51107
Luke Wedmore

Project Description

I am interested in studying seismic hazard and fault zone development and behaviour in the Abruzzo region of central Italy. In particular I will investigate how normal faults interact through relay zones and the geomorphological signature of active faults. By combining ground penetrating radar (GPR) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data with the structural geology of active faults I will look at the role of relay zones in the long-term development of the fault system. Additionally, I will examine the geomorphological and sedimentological signature of active faulting during the Holocene to determine what this can tell us about the behaviour of the faults during this period.

My research will also contribute to a NERC research project by using GPR and TLS to help characterize cosmogenic nuclide sampling locations on active fault planes, ensuring that they have not been affected by geomorphic processes such as hanging wall mass movement or deposition at the base of the fault scarp. This research will produce a greater knowledge of the time elapsed since the last earthquake occurred on bedrock faults, beyond the limit of any historical or seismological records.

My previous work involved using historical records of earthquake shaking in the Italian Apennines to determine the causative faults of historical earthquakes since ~1200AD and to investigate whether triggering of earthquakes by Coulomb stress transfer was behind a sequence of 3 deadly earthquakes that occurred within a month of each other in 1703.

Research Publications


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