UCL Qatar

Student Enrolment

Student Enrolment

Our application process is currently open for entry in August 2014. The application deadline for all Master's degree programmes is 1 May 2014. The application deadline for the Diploma in Academic Research and Methods (DARM) is 1 June 2014.

Late applications to all programmes may be considered on a case by case basis subject to availability.

Apply Now...

Short Courses

UCL Qatar offers short courses aimed at professionals working in the field of cultural heritage, who are looking to expand their knowledge, learn about new developments in their field, or understand other disciplines in their chosen field. Lecturers for the courses come from a wide range of international institutions around the world, including UCL.

Below is a list of Short Courses scheduled to be delivered by UCL Qatar during the period January - May 2014. Please continue to check the website regularly for updates as new programmes become available.

To request an application form for any of the courses below, or for further information, please contact the Short Courses Team

The Biodeterioration of Organic Materials

Lecturer: Gabrielle Zammit, University of Malta

Duration: 1 day course

Dates and Time: 3 February 2014, 9.00am - 12.00pm

Location: Room 1A11, UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City

Number of Participants: 10 - 20

This short course is aimed at training museum staff on the anatomy and characteristics of organic materials such as linen, cotton, silk and wood. An overview of the biological deterioration of textiles, wood, paintings and composite works of art will be given. Methods and techniques for disinfestation, disinfection and preventive conservation will be discussed.

Costume Mounting for Exhibition and Museum Display

Lecturer: Tatiana Kousoulou, Directorate of Conservation, Greek Ministry of Culture

Duration: 5 day course

Dates and Time: 23 - 27 February 2014,  9.00am - 2.30pm 

Location: Sheikh Faisal Museum

Number of Participants: 10 - 15

Costumes and dress are the most challenging objects to display in museums and exhibitions. They lack rigid support and mounts must be prepared in a three dimensional form for display and exhibition. Clothing is made to fit a particular person, so in the Mounting for Museum Exhibition course we will show how you can try to create the body for which a garment was originally made, taking into account not only aesthetics, but also preventive conservation. During costume mounting the garment should not only be shown accurately, but it should also be fully supported, with no stress, a uniform distribution of its weight and protected from any contact with harmful support material.

This course will explain the basic practices of making mounts for costumes and costume accessories, using solid-form torsos, dummies and special constructions, according to the precise needs of each object and exhibition requirements. This course will include theoretical and practical sessions: during lectures the planning and the design of a mount, the appropriate material and equipment needed as well as the different ways of preparing a specific object for exhibition will be discussed and presented using case studies. In practical sessions participants will have the opportunity to create their own mount for a selected object (costume or accessory) working alone or as a team. Each participant or group of participants will undertake a different type of construction and finish with a final day of discussion of the results. The course is addressed to all museum professionals who work with dress and costumes such as conservators, curators, collection managers, museum object handlers, history and museology students etc. Basic dressmaking skills would be helpful in practical sessions.

Disability Awareness

Lecturer: Jess Bool

Duration: 2 day course

Dates and Time: 

24 - 25 February 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

26 - 27 February 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

Location: Room 1A11, UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building Education City

Number of Participants: 12

Everyone has a role to play when ensuring inclusivity and accessibility! This two-day training course will give participants an introduction into the history of the disability rights movement, recent legislation and the Social Model of Disability as well as an opportunity to put this learning into practice and relate it directly to their own organisations and roles. 

The training will focus upon how these developments have impacted on the lives of disabled people and also, how they are relevant to participants, highlighting best practice found around the world. Through fun, practical activities and discussions, participants will leave the training with more confidence in their ability to respond to a range of situations.

Exploring The Visitor Experience: Introducing new skills to inspire your visitors and team

Lecturer: Nigel Sutton, NDS Production Australia

Duration: 3 day course

Dates and Time: 9 - 11 March 2014, 9.30am - 2.30pm 

Location: Classroom, Museum of Islamic Art and Mathaf (held at two locations over 3 days)

Number of Participants: 40 - 45

How does a visitor perceive your museum? When does their experience start and end? What narratives do they engage in? What are your expectations and what are your visitors expectations? In these sessions we look at ourselves and our museum through the eyes of the visitor.

These sessions are an introduction to creative thinking in the museum environment with a practical application, suitable for all cultural institutions interested in developing or refreshing public programs, education activities, tours and talks. Using live interpretation and improvisation methodologies these sessions explore new ways to interpret your existing objects, themes and galleries. Examples of successful and innovative visitor experience programs will also be introduced and discussed. The workshop process is designed to unlock rigid patterns of thinking by changing the way we view our work. Participants will develop an idea for a new program/s which could be used in a/their cultural institution.

This course is suitable to a broad range of Museum practitioners, with a focus on anyone who is involved in, or wants to be involved in: face to face visitor contact, development of public programs, tours, talks, presentations, live interpretation.

Live Interpretation, developing tours that engage and inspire visitors

Lecturer: Nigel Sutton, NDS Production Australia

Duration: 2 day course

Dates and Time: 12 - 13 March 2014, 9.30am - 2.30pm

Location: Classroom, Museum of Islamic Art and Mathaf (held at two locations over 2 days)

Number of Participants: 40 - 45

Over the two days we will explore and gain practical skills in the following topics: The role of the tour guide in a museum context. The development of strong and compelling narratives. Developing effective highlight tours and exhibition specific tours. Communication styles and techniques used for tours. Communicating difficult and sensitive content. Techniques and tools for engaging with multiple age groups and languages. How to inspire your visitors and your tour guide.

Working with Babies and Children under five in Museums, Libraries and Archives

Lecturer: Anne Harding, Independent trainer. She specialises in effective provision for children and young people in schools, libraries, museums and other cultural and heritage settings.

Duration: 1 day course

Dates and Time: 16 March 2014, 9.00am - 3.00pm

Location: Seminar Room, Museum of Islamic Art

Number of Participants: 16 - 20

An interactive, practical course for museum, gallery, archive and library staff. We will explore effective provision for babies and under 5’s and their families, and identify ways to support their learning.

Expected learning outcomes

· greater understanding of early child development

· more awareness of the role of museums, galleries, libraries and archives in supporting babies and young children

· ideas for organising and delivering successful sessions for babies and under 5s

· strategies for maximising enjoyment and participation

· tips for communication and managing child and parent behaviour

· more confidence in choosing and using artefacts, books and other resources

· methods for helping parents and carers to support children’s learning effectively

Working with Children in Museums, Libraries and Archives

Lecturer: Anne Harding, Independent trainer. She specialises in effective provision for children and young people in schools, libraries, museums and other cultural and heritage settings.

Duration: 1 day course

Dates and Times: 18 March 2014, 9.00am - 3.00pm

Location: Seminar Room, Museum of Islamic Art

Number of Participants: 16 - 20

A practical course on successful provision for children between the ages of five and twelve. We will identify methods to support their learning and engage them effectively in museums, galleries, libraries and archives.

Expected learning outcomes

· greater understanding of children and their needs

· more awareness of the strengths and weaknesses of current provision

· new ideas for engaging with children and breaking down barriers to use strategies for supporting schools and formal learning

· ideas for effective family learning

· examples of good practice

· more confidence in working with children

Supporting Children with Special Educational Needs in Museums, Libraries and Archives

Lecturer: Anne Harding, Independent trainer. She specialises in effective provision for children and young people in schools, libraries, museums and other cultural and heritage settings.

Duration: 1 day course

Dates and Time: 19 March, 09:00 - 15:00

Location: Seminar Room, Museum of Islamic Art

Number of Participants: 16 - 20

This practical course will explore the needs of children and young people with learning difficulties and identify ways to support them effectively and increase the value and appeal of museums, galleries, libraries, and archives to them.

Expected learning outcomes

· increased understanding of learning difficulties and their implications

· practical methods for supporting learning and overcoming barriers

· strategies for developing SEN children’s engagement with cultural and heritage settings and offers

new ideas for inclusive activities and promotions

· examples of good practice

· more confidence when helping children and young people with learning problems

An Introduction to Textile Conservation

Lecturer: Louise Squire, The Glass House

Duration: 5 day course

Dates and Time: 23 - 27 March 2014, 9.30am - 2.30pm

Location: Room 2A40, UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City

Number of Participants: 8 - 10

A basic understanding of the nature of textiles is fundamental to the science of textile conservation. This short course will introduce the participant to textiles in their entirety – from part of an historical costume or historic tapestry to a modern art piece made with textile.  

The course will look at textile structures and discuss different fibre types and how these differences effect the degradation and consequently the conservation treatment. You will have the opportunity to handle, discuss and examine a small collection of historic textiles with a view to documenting and writing a condition report.  We will discuss possible treatment options, preventive conservation techniques, and methods of handling, display and storage necessary for their long-term preservation. We will look at remedial conservation techniques, such as support methods and basic stitching techniques. You will have the opportunity to test these out yourselves in a relaxing and fun environment. By the end of this course you will have a basic overview of what is involved in textile conservation and you will know whether this is the career for you.

Care of Collections for Books and Archival materials

Lecturer: Jocelyn Cumings, Camberwell College of Arts, University of the Arts London

Duration: 3 day course

Dates and Times: 6 - 8 April 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

Location: Room 2A26, UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City

Number of Participants: 12

In three days you will be introduced to the topic of collection care and the preventive conservation care measures you can take to help maximise the life of your collections. This will be set within a risk analysis framework. There will be time to discuss individual challenges that participants may have.

We will cover the following:

· An introduction to all the different materials that make up archive and library collections and you will be given information about why these materials deteriorate.

· A discussion on care and handling of all different formats

· A discussion on how you can recognize what requires interventive conservation.

· Storage options for all different formats.

· The making of some easily made enclosures for book and archival material

Surveying for Archaeologists

Lecturer: Frank Stremke

Duration: 5 day course

Dates and Times:

Classroom: 8 - 10 April 2014 (3 day course), 9.00am - 2.30pm

Practical: 13 - 15 April 2014 (1 day practical course per group on one of these dates), 9.00am - 2.30pm

Classroom: 20 April (1 day course) Practical session times to be confirmed

Location: Room 1A11, UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education city

Number of Participants: 14

The course is meant to be an overview and introduction of surveying techniques and procedures used in modern archaeological fieldwork. Students will acquire necessary skills for collecting data of sites, features and finds as well as creating simple site plans.

Basic theoretical knowledge is meant as a tool for deciding on which surveying strategy can and should be applied. The Practical part will allow for testing new skills and training in a realistic environment. There is no previous experience needed, a general understanding of geometry is however useful. Please bring a pocket calculator.

Natural History Conservation

Lecturer: Chris Collins, Natural History Museum London

Duration: 5 day course

Dates and Times: 20 - 24 April 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm 

Location: Room 1A08, UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City

Number of Participants: 12 - 15

The course will cover the following topics;

· Practical conservation of Natural History Materials (including Palaeontological and Geological Materials)

· Preparation of palaeontological, botanical and entomological collections

· Preventive Conservation and environmental monitoring and control

· Risk Management

· Surveys, Triage and Assessment

The course will focus on current methods used to collect, store and stabilise natural history materials. It will also review approaches to the assessment of collections so that participants will be able to prioritise conservation and collections work so that their collections are made more accessible for exhibition and research. The course will be practical and students will learn how to undertake many of the basic routine conservation procedures required to manage the care and conservation of a natural history collection. By the end of the course students will be able to identify deterioration in their collections, understand current methods of storage and control and be able to undertake basic conservation and collections care work on a natural history collection.

Students should have an understanding of the range of materials found in natural history collections, a basic understanding of chemistry and the aims of conservation.

Using Drama in Education as a Tool for Learning in Museums and Galleries

Lecturer: Argyris Karapitsanis, Teaching Fellow for Museums, Heritage and Archaeology, UCL Qatar

Duration: 3 day course

Dates and Times: 13 - 15 May 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

Location: Room 1A08, UCL, Georgetown Building, Education City

Number of Participants: 14 - 18

This specific course is an introduction to applied drama and specifically to drama in education, outlining ways that it can be used in museum education settings. 

Drama in education refers to the process of planning activities and workshops by creating imaginary worlds using theatre techniques but is very different from traditional theatre practises. It enhances self-expression, knowledge of one’s self and promotes cooperation. Through drama we can examine how people and children are integrated into society and how they interact with others. With drama in education as a tool we can plan entire workshops using museum exhibits, fairy tales, various forms of art or simply everyday facts and objects.

The form of the course is intended to be quite practical and participants will have the chance to take active part in activities. We will examine the theory, practise and planning of educational drama workshops that can take place in museums and galleries by using exhibits, as well as by being parts of independent cultural educational programs. This course is very well suited for museum professionals (especially in education), teachers, parents, museum studies students or anyone with an interest in culture and education.

Research and Writing Skills

Lecturers: Sara Felix and Lynn DeRose, UCL Qatar

Duration: 2 day course

Dates: 19 - 20 May 2014, 10:00am - 2.00pm

Location: Room 1A08, UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City

Number of Participants: 12

UCL Qatar will offer a two-day training session on how to research and write short narratives (e.g. objects’ history) academically and professionally.

Participants will develop their abilities to:

· Research a wide range of reliable sources

· Evaluate and use sources for professional purposes

· Understand what plagiarism is and how to avoid it

· Give credit to their sources

· Improve and structure their writing (eg paragraphing)

Participants should have prior experience of communicating orally in English and be comfortable reading and writing in English.