UCL Qatar

Student Enrolment

Student Enrolment

Recruitment to all of our degree programmes is currently closed. The application window will re-open in October 2014, for entry in August 2015. From October 2014, it will be possible to submit an online application via the 'Apply Now' link below.

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Short Courses

UCL Qatar offers short courses aimed at professionals working in the field of cultural heritage, who are looking to expand their knowledge, learn about new developments in their field, or understand other disciplines in their chosen field. Lecturers for the courses come from a wide range of international institutions around the world, including UCL.

Below is a list of Short Courses scheduled to be delivered by UCL Qatar during the period September - December 2014. Please continue to check the website regularly for updates as new programmes become available.

To request an application form for any of the courses below, or for further information, please contact the Short Courses Team.

Download the Short Courses Programme Autumn 2014 Booklet

Lecturer: Mrs Kathy Tubb, Lecturer UCL Institute of Archaeology and Dr Neil Brodie, Senior Research Fellow University of Glasgow

Duration: 5 day course

When: 7 September - 11 September 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

Location: UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 12

This 5 day course will consist of the following topics and discussions:

· Introduction and lecture focusing on Context, Looting and Commodification

· Case Study - DVD ‘I gravplundrarnas spar’ concerning the illicit trafficking of art and antiquities followed by work in small groups over ethical dilemma and discussion of possible outcomes.

· Introduction to basic principles of law and to UNESCO and its conventions

· Looting Networks and Museum Acquisitions with particular emphasis on Cambodia as a case study.

· Museum Ethics focusing on the Getty Museum and the National Gallery of Australia

· DVD Network followed by work in small groups over ethical dilemma and discussion of possible outcomes.

· Fakes and Forgeries

· Ethical Issues regarding Human Remains and Museum Collections

· Case Study - DVD The Persian Mummy

· Case Study - DVD Stealing History followed by lecture on Scholars and the Trade

· Problems in Collecting from the Market

· General discussion.

Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI)

Lecturer: Mr Stuart Laidlaw, Lecturer, UCL Institute of Archaeology

Duration: 2 day course

When: 10 September - 11 September 2014, 9.00am - 12:00pm

Location: Room 2A39, UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 8

RTI is a computational photographic method that captures a subject’s surface shape and colour and enables the interactive re-lighting of the subject from any direction. RTI also permits the mathematical enhancement of the subject’s surface shape and colour attributes. The enhancement functions of RTI reveal surface information that is not disclosed under direct empirical examination of the physical object. Today’s RTI software and related methodologies were constructed by a team of international developers.

RTI images are created from information derived from multiple digital photographs of a subject shot from a stationary camera position. In each photograph, light is projected from a different known, or knowable, direction. This process produces a series of images of the same subject with varying highlights and shadows. Lighting information from the images is mathematically synthesized to generate a mathematical model of the surface, enabling a user to re-light the RTI image interactively and examine its surface on a screen.

Each RTI resembles a single, two-dimensional (2D) photographic image. Unlike a typical photograph, reflectance information is derived from the three-dimensional (3D) shape of the image subject and encoded in the image per pixel, so that the synthesized RTI image “knows” how light will reflect off the subject. When the RTI is opened in RTI viewing software, each constituent pixel is able to reflect the software's interactive “virtual” light from any position selected by the user. This changing interplay of light and shadow in the image discloses fine details of the subject's 3D surface form.

RTI was invented by Tom Malzbender and Dan Gelb, research scientists at Hewlett-Packard Labs. The course will aim to show how to easily use this complicated photographic technique and to recommend various ways of storing and using these pictures. Participants will take images of a few objects to demonstrate how to set up and maintain consistency in the photography.

Conservation of Wooden Works of Art

Lecturer: Mrs Helen Farmakalidis, Independent Conservator

Duration: 5 day course

When: 21 September - 25 September 2014, 9.00am - 4:30pm

Location: UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 8

The objective of this course is the training on the conservation of wooden objects and wooden panels. This course is focused on conservation issues and can be attended by conservation students and by conservators specialised in other materials (metals, inorganic, paper).

From the earliest years wood played a major role in human civilization. It was an important material for the construction of artefacts, architectural elements and decorative art. The use of wood reflects the universal availability of the resource, as well as the working properties of the timber. It has been used as an engineering material and as a substrate for paint application.

This course is an introduction to the conservation of wooden works of art. The participants will attend morning lectures on the application of wood in art, the structure of wood, deterioration aspects, diagnostic analytical techniques and preventive and active conservation treatment. During the afternoon sections of the course, the participants will be able to practice the techniques on modern wooden panels and on wooden objects.

By the end of this course participants will be able to assess the condition of wooden objects, recognize the nature and the extent of deterioration. They will also be capable of applying conservation methods in order to stabilize and protect the wooden structure from further damage.

Wooden objects located outside suffer from uncontrolled environmental conditions. They display preservation problems, such as cracks and splits mainly because of changes in the water content of wood. Weathering of wood causes irreversible deterioration to structures.

During this course, conservators will become familiar with the deterioration damage that occurs to outdoor wooden works of art and the required conservation treatments.

Searching for, finding, and using other people's words, work and ideas

Lecturer: Mr John Royce, Consultant, Live 2 Read

Duration: 1 day course

When: 22 October 2014, 9.00am - 2:30pm

Location: UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 20

In the age of the internet, anyone can search for - and find - information. Finding good, reliable, authoritative, scholarly information can be much more difficult. Using the information we find honestly and honourably presents a new range of problems and difficulties.

In this short course/ workshop, we look at tools, strategies and techniques for searching deeply, finding quality information, assessing the merits of the information we find, and at acceptable and academic ways to integrate other people's words and ideas into our own work.

Participants will enjoy hands-on activities, share experience, strategies - and problems!

Outcomes: at the end of this CPD workshop, participants will

· have awareness of how to use search engines to better effect

· have knowledge of tools and techniques other than search engines which give access to scholarly and authoritative resources

· have a range of techniques for assessing the quality, reliability, currency and authority of sources and information found

· have techniques for handling conflicting and contradictory information

· be able to use other people's words and ideas to support what they want to say (as against being what they say)

· better understanding of why, when and how to use other people's words and ideas in scholarly and ethically accepted ways

· have better regard for other people's intellectual property and copyright/s

Archaeological Illustration: technical drawing of objects

Lecturer: Miss Caroline Hebron, Independent Illustrator

Duration: 5 day course

When: 19 October - 23 October 2014, 9.00am - 12:00pm

Location: Room 2A40, UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 8

This short course introduces students to archaeological illustration. It is a practical course comprising five three hour sessions. Students will gain an understanding of the purpose of illustration as an archaeological recording method. Archaeological illustration is a technical drawing discipline and students will learn about the conventions, techniques and instruments involved.

The practical sessions will cover the illustration of both ceramics and objects and each student will be expected to produce at least one drawing from each category. Basic drawing skills are required.

Intangible Heritage and Traditional Music

Lecturer: Mr Rolf Kilius, Curator of Oral and Musical Cultures British Library/Qatar Foundation Partnership

Duration: 5 day course

When: 26 October - 30 October 2014, 8.00am - 1.30pm

Location: UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 12

This self-contained five-day course aims to combine theoretical and practical knowledge, no previous experience is required.

In the first three days the course convener will provide an overview of present discussions around intangible heritage, intellectual property, copyright, traditional cultural expressions, oral history, traditional music and ethical aspects of recording/filming and documenting people.

The fourth day will be a practical training session, which will include interview techniques, the use of microphones, audio recorder, video and still camera and information about digital back-up techniques. All equipment required will be provided.

The final fifth day (evening or night) will be a recording event of traditional music and/or oral history. 

In the course students will gain experience through the following areas:

· Knowledge and importance of intangible heritage

· The ownership of knowledge/intangible heritage

· Preservation and sustenance of intangible knowledge/intangible heritage

· Intangible Cultural Heritage and UNESCO

· Oral history – collection, preservation and use of recorded memories (with special emphasis on the oral history of the Gulf region)

· Traditional Music and their importance for people (with special emphasis on the music of the Gulf region)

· Oral history and traditional music – connecting past, present and importance for the future

· Learn to use digital media

· Investigate interdisciplinary relationship between anthropology, music and history

· Prepare, conduct and evaluate a practical recording session

Introduction to Islamic Architecture

Lecturer: Dr Djamel Boussa, Assistant Professor of Architecture, Qatar University

Duration: 5 day course

When: 26 October - 30 October 2014, 10.00am - 1.00pm

Location: Auditorium, Second Floor, Qatar Museums Tower 2

Number of Participants: 25

Language: Arabic

This course provides an understanding to the meaning and development of Islamic architecture. It aims to identify human settlements, clarifying the urban and non-urban factors and their impact upon the Islamic architectural styles within different environments. Furthermore, the workshop brings about the meaning of identity and its relationship to contemporary architecture by giving a comprehensive understanding of the principles of Islamic Architecture and its development through time. By the end of the course the participants will be able to ascertain, the meaning of Islamic architecture, its development and how it can be applied at present within the emerging global world.

The main objectives of the course are:

· Provide students with a suitable background to understand the meaning of Islamic urban and architectural elements, which they can apply in their architectural projects

· Introduce a comprehensive understanding about the meaning of Islamic Architecture and its relevance for the present

· Reveal the relationship between the religion (Quran, Hadith, Sharia law) and Islamic Architecture

· Discuss the meaning of specific concepts related to, Identity, Preservation and Conservation of Islamic urban and architectural heritage

Using Drama in Education as a Tool for Learning in Museums and Galleries I

Lecturer: Mr Argyris Karapitsanis, UCL Qatar

Duration: 3 day course

When: 2 November - 4 November 2014, 9:00am - 2:30pm

Location: Classroom, Museum of Islamic Art, Education Wing

Number of Participants: 16 - 20

This course is an introduction to applied drama and specifically to drama in education, outlining ways that it can be used in museum education settings. 

Drama in education refers to the process of planning activities and workshops by creating imaginary worlds using theatre techniques but is very different from traditional theatre practices. It enhances self-expression, knowledge of one’s self and promotes cooperation. Through drama we can examine how people and children are integrated into society and how they interact with others. With drama in education as a tool we can plan entire workshops using museum exhibits, fairy tales, various forms of art or simply everyday facts and objects.

The form of the course is intended to be quite practical and participants will have the chance to take active part in activities. We will examine the theory, practice and planning of educational drama workshops that can take place in museums and galleries by using exhibits, as well as by being parts of independent cultural educational programs. This course is very well suited for museum professionals (especially in education), teachers, parents, museum studies students or anyone with an interest in culture and education.

Using Drama in Education as a Tool for Learning in Museums and Galleries II

Lecturer: Mr Argyris Karapitsanis, UCL Qatar

Duration: 2 day course

When: 5 November - 6 November 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

Location: Classroom, Museum of Islamic Art, Education Wing

Number of Participants: 16 - 20

This course discusses and presents ways of planning drama in education programmes that can be attached to museum objects and enhance learning in museum and gallery spaces.

It is a course that uses as a starting point the knowledge acquired at the “Drama in education as a tool for learning in museum and galleries I” course and moves on to the next level, discussing and investigating ways of:

· Deciding the social phenomenon that will be investigated trough the drama in education program

· Selecting the source (story) that the program will be based on (literature, art, history of a museum object etc.)

· Steps and methods of planning the drama in education program

· Implementation of the program

The course requires the participants to have attended the first part “Drama in education as a tool for learning in museum and galleries I”.

From Museum Objects to Monuments I: caring for the heritage by controlling the environment

Lecturer: Professor Cliff Price, Lecturer, UCL Institute of Archaeology

Duration: 2 day course

When: 09 November - 10 November 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

Location: UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 12 - 15

The course will start by looking at some of the many actions that can be taken to prevent deterioration of the cultural heritage. It will then focus on three of the areas that are most relevant to conservators: control of light, control of the moisture in the air, and pollution. The course will include practical work and a museum visit, to see preventive conservation in practice and to see how the design of showcases can have an important role in preventing the deterioration of objects inside them.

The course is aimed at anyone who wishes to learn about preventive conservation, whether in the context of museums or of historic buildings and monuments. No prior knowledge is required.

From Museum Objects to Monuments II: the decay and conservation of stone

Lecturer: Professor Cliff Price, Lecturer, UCL Institute of Archaeology

Duration: 3 day course

When: 11 November - 13 November 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

Location: UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 12 - 15

The course will start with a brief introduction to the geology of stone, and to the ways in which the properties of stone can influence its performance in use. We will go on to look at some of the causes of stone decay, and at the measures that can be taken to remedy and to prevent it – both in the context of museums and of historic buildings/monuments. The course will include case studies, and a visit to an archaeological site. The visit will be followed by practical work in the laboratory, to see whether salts are playing a significant role in the deterioration of the site.

The course will be of interest to anyone wanting to gain a broad overview of stone conservation; it will not teach practical conservation skills. It is not necessary to have taken the preceding course, From museum objects to monuments I: caring for the heritage by controlling the environment.

Museum Ethics

Lecturer: Dr Martin Schaerer, President of ICOM Ethics Committee

Duration: 2 day course

When: 16 November - 17 November 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

19 November - 20 November 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

Location: Seminar Room, Museum of Islamic Art, Education Wing

Number of Participants: 15

· Main goal: Sensitisation for ethical issues.

· Target public: Directors and curators of any type of museum.

· Introduction into museums ethics, especially in the context of the International Council of Museums (ICOM).

· Presentation and discussion of the Code of Ethics.

· Workshops with concrete cases preparing participants to the application of ethic principles.

In 1985 ICOM published a first working draft for an ICOM Code of professional ethics. The new Code was adopted at the 15th ICOM General Conference in 1986. The actual version dates from 2004. It reflects principles generally accepted by the international museum community and represents a minimum standard for museums. Membership in ICOM is an affirmation of the Code. The Ethics Committee of ICOM advises ICOM in all matters relating to museum professional ethics.

The main general topics in the Ethics Committee’s daily life are the illicit traffic of cultural goods, clandestine archaeological excavations, destruction of cultural goods, emergency actions and disaster relief, claims for returning objects to the original communities or of stolen/confiscated items to the rightful owner, mediation for contentious issues and unethical behaviour of museum professionals. An interesting question to discuss is the global validity of the basic principles of the Code. Is it valid worldwide or should it be adapted to other cultural areas?

Introduction to Archival Management

Lecturer: Miss Tiffany Schureman, Assistant Professor, VCU Qatar

Duration: 5 day course

When: 23 November - 27 November 2014, 9.00am - 12:00pm

Location: UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 15

In this course, attendees will learn the basics of archival management including theories, methodologies and issues. They will learn about constructing archives policy and procedure, acquisitions, accessions, arrangement and description, archives preservation, and copyright. There is no experience required. The course is aimed at people who work in archives or manage archives employees.

Visitor Services and Live Interpretation

Lecturer: Mr Nigel Sutton, Director, NDS Productions

Duration: 5 day course

When: 23 November - 27 November 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

Location: Classroom, Museum of Islamic Art, Education Wing

Number of Participants: 40

Day 1 and 2: In these sessions we will discuss and explore the following; How does a visitor perceive your museum? When does their experience start and end? What narratives do they engage in? What are your expectations and what are your visitor’s expectations? What is the role of Visitor Services? How to inspire your visitors and your tour guide.

Days 3, 4 and 5: Live Interpretation - developing visitor experiences that engage and inspire: Over the three days we will explore and gain practical skills in the following topics: Developing skills to interpret museum objects. The development of strong and compelling museum narratives. Developing effective highlight tours and exhibition specific tours. Communication styles and techniques used for tours. Communicating difficult and sensitive content. Techniques and tools for engaging with multiple age groups and languages.

This 5-day course is designed to develop practical and usable skills. Participants will explore and practice visitor engagement techniques, gain a clear understanding of the role of Visitor Services, improve visitor experience outcomes, plan and develop Visitor Service Standards.

The Sea is our Life: the sea people and seaborne exploration

Lecturer: Professor Dionisius Agius, Al Qasimi Professor of Arabic Studies and Islamic Material Culture University Of Exeter

Duration: 5 day course

When: 23 November - 27 November 2014, 8.00am - 1:30pm

Location: UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 30

This course charts the development of ships and boats in the Western Indian Ocean from the 7th to the 20th century based on Mediaeval Arabic sources together with iconographic evidence and archaeological finds. Trading activities in the region resulted in a cross-fertilisation, not only of goods but also of ideas and culture uniting the maritime peoples together.

The Arabian Gulf and Oman have traditionally shared a common destiny within the Western Indian Ocean. The seasonal monsoonal winds were fundamental to the physical and human unities of the seafaring communities, producing a way of life in harmony with the natural world, a world which abruptly changed with the discovery of oil. What remains are the memories of a seafaring past, which we will explore in a number of lectures and seminars by looking at the rich artistic heritage of the region, and its proud history of maritime traditions and customs in the recollections of a dying generation. The series of lectures and seminars will culminate in a visit to the traditional dhow yard at the Doha maritime museum.

The course is open to all students with an interest in maritime heritage. No previous knowledge of maritime culture and history is required.

Engaging the Young Mind I: Museums

Lecturer: Mr Nigel Sutton, Director, NDS Productions

Duration: 3 day course

Dates and Time: 30 November - 02 December 2014, 9.00am - 2:30pm

Location: Classroom, Museum of Islamic Art, Education Wing

Number of Participants: 40

Over the three days we will explore and gain practical skills in the following topics: Interpreting museum objects and themes for children. The development of strong and compelling narratives that engage the young mind. Developing engagement activities for children including object handling and exhibition trails. Communication styles and techniques used for children in a museum context. Communicating difficult and sensitive content with children. Techniques and tools for engaging with specific age groups.

This 3-day course is designed to improve communication and engagement skills with younger visitors. Participants will gain skills by developing outlines for new children’s live interpretation tours and activities. Examples of successful children’s tours and activities will be introduced and discussed. We will also explore the use of children’s mascots as an engagement tool used by cultural institutions across the globe.

Engaging the Young Mind II: Outreach Programme Development

Lecturer: Mr Nigel Sutton, Director, NDS Productions

Duration: 2 day course

When: 03 December - 04 December 2014, 9.00am - 2.30pm

Location: Classroom, Museum of Islamic Art, Education Wing

Number of Participants: 15

This two day course is practice based and will work with an outreach programme that is currently in development. Day one will be reviewing and developing content for an existing outreach programme. Day two will be delivering the programme on site to the intended audience. Day two will also be a review and discussion of the process and learning outcomes. Participants will gain practical skills in object and theme communication, live interpretation and audience engagement. (The outreach programme and location to be confirmed)

Intermediate Audience Development

Lecturer: Mrs Jo Hargreaves, Director, Morris Hargreaves McIntyre

Duration: 4 day course

When: 14 December - 17 December 2014, 9.00am - 2:30pm

Location: UCL Qatar, Georgetown Building, Education City, Doha

Number of Participants: 16

This four-day training programme is designed to introduce participants to the principles and practice of developing audiences for museums and galleries in a participative and engaging way. As well as presentations on audience development approaches, the course will include inspiring case-studies from around the world, guest speakers and practice in a museum-setting. Throughout the course participants will be encouraged to apply their learning to case-studies selected from their own organisations.