The official deadline for applications for September 2014 is 18th July 2014.

The programme is modular, allowing students maximum flexibility. Students may undertake an MSc or Post Graduate diploma in one year of full-time study, or in two-years of part-time study, or by flexible study where modules can be taken over up to a maximum of five years. Each module has a credit rating, and to be awarded a PG Diploma students must successfully amass 120 credits. For the MSc they need to gain a total of 180 credits. 

The course has three central components:

Theoretical Modules in Child Development and Psychoanalytic Concepts comprising lectures and smaller seminar discussions.

Observation Modules based on an observation of an infant and his/her family within the home, and a second observation of young children within a toddler group or nursery school - reported and explored confidentially in small seminar groups. Research Modules on qualitative and quantitative research methodology developing students' ability to critically evaluate claims, theories and evidence in the human sciences, culminating in empirical research work and the completion of a dissertation.

Research Modules on qualitative and quantitative research methodology developing students' ability to critically evaluate claims, theories and evidence in the human sciences, culminating in empirical research work and the completion of a dissertation.

Click here to listen to what past students have had to say about the course.



Voluntary Placements

We facilitate voluntary placements at a number of partner charities and organisations. This offers an opportunity to gain first hand, relevant work experience and supervision for students wishing to enrich their experience of working with children. Please click here for full information on this.

 
 
 
Start date:
September 2014

Content

Structure

Obligatory Modules

Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development 1: Infancy

Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development 2: Toddlerhood and Early Childhood

Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development 3: Latency and Adolescence

Psychoanalytic Thought 1: An Introduction to Psychoanalytic Theory 

Psychoanalytic Thought 2: The Clinical Theory of Psychoanalysis

Research Methods 2: Introduction to Statistical Analysis

Observation 1: Parent-Infant

Dissertation

Optional Modules

Observation 2: Toddler Observation

OR

Observation 3: Observation of a Nursery Aged Child



 Please click here for the detailed Programme Specification

Application

Entry Requirements

Any experience of working with children or within research would be an advantage but is not essential.

Please click here for information about our English proficiency requirements

Deadline for Applications
Application Process
Funding

Please note: this course is not eligible for US Federal Loan Authority funding.

The Anna Freud Centre offers one bursary for this MSc course (£3000 per year) which is open only to Home and EU Students. It is awarded based on academic ability and potential as well as on financial need. Please note, students are only eligible to apply once they have been issued with a firm offer from UCL for this course. The bursary is administered by the Anna Freud Centre and is not part of UCL.

For information on general scholarship opportunities, please select the link below:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships/graduate

Testimonials

Click here to listen to what some of our past student have had to say about their experience on the course.

“I chose to study Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology at the Anna Freud Centre because of its high academic standing and historical tradition. In addition, the centre offers intimate class sizes and a combination of hands on experience, through observations and research, which provides a solid educational environment with an excellent reputation.” 

Emily, USA  

''My studies helped me obtain a post working with children, and to work there with a high degree of efficacy, thanks to the comprehensive knowledge of developmental issues gained from the MSc. I feel indebted to the Anna Freud Centre’'.

Brian, now working as assistant child psychotherapist.

Careers

Contact

FAQs

Q. What do people do with an MSc in Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology

A. Students who successfully complete the MSc can apply their degree in a

variety of settings. Our graduates have found work as psychology assistants, or

child mental health workers, taken up posts as senior research fellows and have

been admitted to psychotherapy trainings in both adult and child programmes.

Several students have been admitted onto PhD programmes at internationally

recognised universities, whilst others have gone into areas such as teacher

training, speech science and related child development fields.


Q. What kind of background do you look for in successful candidates?

A. Whilst a background in Psychology or a social science is useful, it is not

essential and applications from all background disciplines are considered.


Q. Would I need to have lots of research experience to secure an offer?

A. The course assumes no previous research experiences although many

students already have some basic experience and knowledge of some area of

research. The course considers it more important that students develop the

emotional ability and intellectual capacity to understand concepts central to

research and how these translate to both theoretical and observational contexts.


Q. I’m an overseas student where can I convert my grades to find out if I am eligible for the course?

A. You can find information on converting grades on the graduate admissions

website under country information http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students

/international-students/country-information/


Q. How does this MSc differ from the other psychoanalytic MScs offered by your department?

A. Central to the concept and identity of this MSc lies the concept of the

integration between theory, observational skills and research. The course

envisages its graduates as being able to translate concepts across these

domains and therefore develop an appreciation of the strengths and

weaknesses of each domain itself and areas of overlap between domains. As

such, it forms an excellent basis for future careers in anyone of the three

domains.


Q. What kind of careers do people move into after the MSc?

A. The course is very demanding and students who successfully complete the

MSc can apply their degree in a variety of settings. Our graduates have found

work as psychology assistants, or child mental health workers, have taken up

posts as research assistants and have been admitted to psychotherapy trainings

in both adult and child programmes, and clinical psychology training

programmes. Several students have been admitted onto PhD programmes at

internationally recognised universities, whilst others have gone into areas such

as teacher training, speech science and related child development fields.


Q. How much experience of working with children do I need to apply for this course?

A. Some experience of working with children is expected although the nature of

thisexperience can vary greatly. Importance is given to the meaning derived

from and the capacity to think about the experience rather than the sheer

volume of experience itself. An applicant with limited experience but who has

been thoughtful about this experience is favoured to an applicant who has

amassed hours of contact with children but done so with little self reflection.


Q. How long is the course?

A. The programme is modular, allowing students maximum flexibility. Students

may undertake an MSc or Post Graduate diploma in one year of full-time study,

or in two-years of part-time study, or by flexible study where modules can be

taken overup to a maximum of five years. Each module has a credit rating, and

to be awarded a PG Diploma students must successfully amass 120 credits. For

the MSc they need to gain a total of 180 credits.


Q. Is it possible to do the MSc as a part time student?

A. Yes. Given the modular structure, the course can be completed part-time on

a basis to suit the student, this time period ranging from two to a maximum of

five years. Overseas students are warned that applications to study part time

may not meet the requirements for obtaining a visa and therefore overseas

students tend to complete the course in one year.


Q. How stressful is the course?

A. This is a demanding course that is also very rewarding to its students. There

is a  great deal of reading to be completed and observations and research are

time consuming. Full time students should expect to have to devote at least four

days per week to the course which has implications for those students seeking

to hold part-time jobs whilst studying.

Staff

Dr Alejandra Perez is the Programme Director for this course, and is available via email: alejandra.perez@annafreud.org.

Mrs Kay Asquith is the Course Tutor, and is available via email: kay.asquith@annafreud.org