Professor John Harris

Professor of Linguistics

Location:Room 109, Chandler House,
2 Wakefield Street, London WC1N 1PF
Telephone: +44 (0) 207 679 4042 (x24042)
Email: john.harris@ucl.ac.uk

Website

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Research Interests

Phonological theory; phonetics-phonology interface; phonological disorder; variation and change in English.

 

    2012

    • Harris, J. (2012). The foot as a phonotactic domain: 'aw' and 'wa' in English. UCL Working Papers in Linguistics 24 [Accepted]
    • Harris, J. (2012). Wide-domain r-effects in English. Journal of Linguistics Author URL [Accepted]

    2011

    • Harris, J. (2011). Deletion. In van Oostendorp, M., Ewen, C. J., Hume, E. V., Rice, K. (Eds.). The Blackwell Companion to Phonology ( Vol. 3 pp.1597-1621). Oxford, UK Wiley-Blackwell. Author URL Publisher URL

    2009

    • Harris, J. (2009). Why final devoicing is weakening. In Nasukawa, K. (Ed.). Strength Relations in Phonology ( pp.9-46). Berlin Mouton de Gruyter. Publisher URL

    2008

    • Harris, J., Gallon, N., van der Lely, H. (2008). Prosodic complexity and processing complexity: evidence from language impairment. Revista da Associação Brasileira de Lingüística 6 Author URL

    2007

    • Gallon, N., Harris, J., van der Lely, H. (2007). Non-word repetition: An investigation of phonological complexity in children with Grammatical SLI. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics 21(6), 435-455 doi:10.1080/02699200701299982. Author URL
    • Harris, J. (2007). Representation. In de Lacy, P. (Ed.). The Cambridge Handbook of Phonology ( pp.119-138). Cambridge Cambridge University Press.

    2006

    2005

    • Harris, J. (2005). Vowel reduction as information loss. In Carr, P., Durand J Ewen, C. J. (Eds.). Headhood, elements, specification and contrastivity ( pp.119-132). Amsterdam Benjamins.

    2004

    • Harris, J. (2004). Release the captive coda: the foot as a domain of phonetic interpretation. In Local, J., Ogden, R., Temple, R. (Eds.). Phonetic interpretation: Papers in Laboratory Phonology ( pp.103-129). Cambridge Cambridge University Press.

    2003

    • Harris, J. (2003). Grammar-internal and grammar-external assimilation. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. ( pp.281-284). Barcelona Causal Productions.
    • Marshall, C. R., Harris, J., van der Lely, H. K. J. (2003). The nature of phonological representations in children with Grammatical-specific language impairment. Proceedings of the CamLing First Postgraduate Conference in Linguistics. ( pp.511-517). Cambridge Cambridge Institute of Language Research.

    2002

    • Harris, J., Gussmann, E. (2002). Word-final onsets. UCL Working Papers in Linguistics 14 Author URL
    • Marshall, C., Ebbels, S., Harris, J., van der Lely, H. K. J. (2002). Investigating the impact of prosodic complexity on the speech of children with Specific Language Impairment. UCL Working Papers in Linguistics 14, 43-66 Author URL

    2001

    • Harris, J., Urua, E. -. A. (Eds.) (2001). Lenition degrades information: consonant allophony in Ibibio. Speech, Hearing and Language: work in progress 13, 72-105

    2000

    • Harris, J., Lindsey, G. (2000). Vowel patterns in mind and sound. In Burton-Roberts, N., Carr, P., Docherty, G. (Eds.). Phonological knowlege: conceptual and empirical issues ( pp.185-205). Oxford Oxford University Press.

    1999

    • Harris, J., Watson, J., Bates, S. (1999). Prosody and melody in vowel disorder. Journal of Linguistics 35(3), 489-525 Publisher URL

    1998

    • Harris, J. (Ed.) (1998). Licensing Inheritance: an integrated theory of neutralisation. Phonology 14, 315-370
    • Harris, J. (1998). Phonological universals and phonological disorder. In Visch-Brink, E., Bastiaanse, R. (Eds.). Linguistic levels in aphasia: Proceedings of the RuG-SAN-VKL Conference on Aphasiology ( pp.91-117). San Diego, CA Singular Publishing Group.
    • Harris, J., Gussmann, E. (1998). Final codas: why the west was wrong. In Cyran, E. (Ed.). Structure and interpretation in phonology: studies in phonology. ( pp.139-162). Lublin Folia.

 

Current PhD Students

Nick Neasom

Research: Phonological theory, in particular synchronic and diachronic chain shifts; phonological typology; learnability experiments.