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Contact

Contact

If you have any questions about the event please contact Gianpaolo Manalastas.

E: g.manalastas@ucl.ac.uk

T: +44(0)20 3108 4106

UCL Year 12 Gateways Conferences

In July 2014, UCL will be holding a series of interdisciplinary Year 12 conferences, designed to give a taste of what studying at university is like.

The conferences will provide helpful information about applying to competitive universities, and give you the opportunity to meet current students and members of academic staff. The themes that will be addressed in the 2014 conferences are given below.

If you are interested in any of the conferences, please read the eligibility criteria and then make an application using the online application form. The application deadline is 5.00pm on Friday, 4 July 2014, although applications will be assessed as they are received and popular conferences may fill up before this deadline.

Global Health - Tuesday, 15th July 2014

This conference will take a global perspective on issues relating to health, including what we know of medical science today, what we can expect in the future and how where you are born influences your chances of survival.

View the schedule for the day.

Migrant Health

School of Slavonic & East European Studies / Arts & Sciences

Opening Lecture

Patterns of migratory movement have an impact on both individual health and public health and this impact is most apparent when migrant health and public health are understood to include psychological and social factors. The ability of a migrant to integrate into a host society is based on combined mental, physical, cultural and social well-being. Absence of physical ill-health is not by itself sufficient for successful integration in a host society. However, the structural inequalities experienced by migrants have a significant impact on overall health and well-being. Migration health therefore goes beyond the traditional management of diseases among mobile populations and is intrinsically linked with the broader social determinants of health and unequal distribution of such determinants. 

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • Biology
  • Geography
  • Government and Politics
  • Sociology

Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic

UCL School of Pharmacy

Lecture & Seminar

Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus are related diseases that are sweeping the World in epidemic proportions. There is little doubt that this is the result of increased intake of a high calorie fast food diet coupled to the 'thrifty genome' that has been advantageous in human evolution. This seminar/lecture will explore the causes of, and therapies for, this global epidemic.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying: 
  • Biology
  • Chemistry

Bio-artificial Organs – Elixir of Life

UCL Division of Medicine

Lecture & Seminar

“Two pints of milk, a bunch of flowers, and a new liver, please”

The prospect of receiving new organs on demand seems fanciful, but in reality medicine is getting tantalizingly closer each year. 

Around 1000 people die every year in the UK while waiting for a donor organ. For those that are lucky enough to receive a new organ, the wait can be as long as three years. 

Huge resources are being invested in techniques that promise lab grown bio-artificial organs that can eliminate organ shortages worldwide.

These techniques are not only applicable to vital organs – the heart, the liver etc. but also to ears and noses and other tissues that may have been damaged through disease or injury.

In these sessions I’ll discuss recent progress in these techniques and how much still has to be done, and we will discuss the morality of issues such as testing these treatment on animals.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Physics

The Amazing Brain

UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience

Lecture & Seminar

How does the human mind work? This question was studied for centuries, going as far back as the ancient Egyptians and Greeks. Fast forward to the 21st century and we are still struggling to find the answers. This talk discusses the wonderful workings of the human brain and why we have been asking the wrong questions to find out how it actually works.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Mathematics
  • Psychology

Fighting Pandemics

UCL Biochemical EngineeringLecture & Seminar

Lecture & Seminar

Flu kills around 40,000 people a year in the EU. And thats a relatively mild form of the disease which mainly affects the very old or young and those with medical conditions. But every so often, a unique mutation occurs which creates a pandemic version of the virus. This version can infect everyone. No one will be protected and the entire worlds population is at risk. However, there is a way to stop the disease in its tracks and thats with a vaccine. A vaccine can protect people against pandemic flu - the only question is. Can we make it out in time? We will cover the biology of the flu virus, how a flu vaccine is made and the challenges engineers face in fighting pandemics. 

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Physics
  • Mathematics

Suitable for students who are interested in studying:

  • Applied Medical Sciences
  • Arts and Sciences
  • Biochemical Engineering
  • Biomedical Sciences
  • Biological Sciences
  • Human Sciences
  • Neuroscience
  • Pharmacy
  • Science and Technology Studies
  • Slavonic and East European Studies

Read the eligibility criteria and make an application.

Cities - Wednesday, 16th July 2014

This conference will explore our preconceived ideas of cities and urban life, including how cities come in to being, how we try to tame them through planning and construction, their social implications (past and present) and why all of this matters to us today.

View the schedule for the day.

Cities: Dreams and & Realities

The Bartlett School of Architecture

Opening Lecture

Cities link buildings, green spaces and streets together to host to an unplanned mixture of individuals in a constructed environment. They embody a rich history that is continually evolving and growing, providing a context where memories are formed and situated. They allow us to dream about the future and dwell on the past. Architecture is everything - it exists beyond buildings; design is integrated into every fragment, mechanism and action that keeps the city in motion - it is all of the expectations and actualities we as inhabitants consume from the city. We react to this by choosing a particular routine or approach to navigate and inhabit our own personal worlds within reality, and the in-between spaces of the city can be the most important to map for this geography. Wandering in the city reveals the tangled connections of the city in motion, and illustrates it as a fort that gives and takes all citizens, highlighting the many masks the city wears to let work neigbour play, or to evoke familiarity in novelty. We want to inspire you to embark on exploring and appreciating your own city and cultivate personal readings of future uncharted territories.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • Art
  • Environmental Studies
  • Geography
  • Government & Politics
  • Mathematics
  • Physics

The good, the bad and the ugly – how construction impacts on the built environment

The Bartlett School of Construction & Project Management

Lecture & Seminar

Almost everything we do involves the built environment; from where we live, study, watch films, dance, to where we play sports.

Our built environment shapes the way we see the world, and is shaped by all of us: the people who design and build it, and the way we live in it.

We now understand that the built environment we are creating around us has an impact on the planet and not all of it is good. In building our homes, schools, hospitals, football stadia, airports and everything else we rely on in our modern lives, we use many resources - both energy and the materials we grow or extract from the world around us - and some of these are at risk of running out.

Buildings can create a lot of waste in making them and when we finally demolish them at the end of their life. They can use large amounts of energy to light and heat in their day-to-day operation.

So what is good; what is bad and what sort of buildings and cities should we be creating?

Imagine the sort of buildings you would like to live in and see around you? We want to challenge you to think about buildings and construction and to give you an idea of what having a career working in the built environment can mean in terms of contributing to sustainable cities.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • Art & Design
  • Construction (BTEC)
  • Environmental Studies
  • Geography
  • History
  • Mathematics

"Cities in a World of Cities" - the need for a global perspective on urban analysis

UCL Department of Geography

Lecture & Seminar

New trends in urbanisation present challenges to traditional approaches in urban studies. New centres of urban dynamism in Asia present models for urban development across the globe; ongoing urbanisation in some of the poorest countries in the world presents significant developmental challenges. Moreover, urbanists are increasingly aware that defining the urban - demarcating the city - is often defeated by the sprawling form of metropolitan regions and the ways in which extended urbanisation processes have a much wider planetary impact. The talk will present examples of these urbanisation processes and discuss their implications for building new more global approaches to understanding cities.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying: 
  • English
  • History
  • Geography
  • Government & Politics
  • Sociology

Care or Control? Victorian Charity and the Urban Poor

UCL History

Lecture & Seminar

By the 1850s, when the industrial revolution had truly taken hold in Britain, Germany, and some parts of France and Belgium, most people in the big cities lived in conditions of abject poverty. Their housing was badly built, dirty, and overcrowded. They frequently fell victim to disease. Many died young. 

Politicians and social reformers began to take an interest in the conditions of life in the big city. To these mostly rich, upper class people, the urban poor were an object of curiosity. They were also something to be afraid of. ‘Why are cities like this?’ they wondered. ‘Why do so many people live like that?’ 

The answers and the solutions they came up with had wide-reaching effects, many of which we still feel today. But sometimes the motivations of these reformers are unclear to historians. Did the upper class want to change the cities because they really cared for their inhabitants, or did they just want to control their lives?

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying: 
  • English
  • History
  • Geography
  • Government & Politics
  • Sociology

Walking: a (new?) way of understanding the built environment

Bartlett School of Planning

Seminar

Walking is an everyday and common activity, but it has influenced the development of cities throughout history: from the cultural exchange brought about by pilgrims walking from one town to the next one, to the psychogeographical derives that the situationists did in Paris by mid 20th century, and its latest version as interactive walking tours offered in many cities like London. All this knowledge about the city, gathered through a walking approach to it, has informed urban planning and shaped different strategies that places the 'human dimension' of the built environment at its heart: shared spaces, pedestrian routes, multisensorial design of public spaces, streetscape treatments to emphasize the urban heritage, and so on.

This session will explore the relationship between walking and cities and will uncover new sides and dimensions to the same 'old' idea of putting one foot in front of the other.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • Art & Design
  • Design & Technology
  • Environmental Studies
  • Geography
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Physics

Introduction to Planning

Bartlett School of Planning

Lecture

This lecture will be about the big decisions that shape world around us. Decisions about where to build roads, railways, and even towns and cities, where to locate activities within those towns and cities and where to restrict development in order to allow for other uses of the environment. It is also about the very small decisions that individuals, organisations and communities make. Decisions about where to work, how to get to work and about where to live, about whether to support or to oppose new development. Most importantly it is about how planning has developed as a way of trying to make the decisions that shape our built environment better. Now, more than ever, with social, environmental and economic crises baring down upon us we need good planning and good planners to help make good decisions. Some of these problems may seem to get more complicated the more we look at them but finding ways of addressing these problems is just what planning has to offer.This lecture will show you how, at its very best, planning is about taking the complex problems of our modern world and finding creative solutions to the challenges of an uncertain future.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • Art & Design
  • Design & Technology
  • Environmental Studies
  • Geography
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Physics

Suitable for students who are interested in studying:

  • Architecture
  • Architectural and Interdisciplinary Studies
  • History
  • Geography
  • Urban Planning, Design and Management
  • Urban Studies
  • Planning and Real Estate
  • Project Management for Construction

Read the eligibility criteria and make an application.

Language and Culture - Thursday, 17th July 2014

Everyday we use our actions and our words to express ourselves as individuals and as part of a wider society or culture, but how we can be sure that our actions and our words mean what we think they mean? This conference will explore the very basic realities of how we interact with one another.

View the schedule for the day.

The Evolution of Language

UCL Anthropology

Opening Lecture

Only humans use language, and language is found in all human populations. Where did language come from, and why are there so many of them? When did humans start using language? Did it evolve together with our large brains? This introductory talk will discuss how the human brain produces language, why it evolved, the differences between human language and other forms of animal communication, and why humans have created so many mutually unintelligible languages when, in fact, only one would suffice. This talk will introduce students to the science of language from the multiple perspectives of neuroscience, cognitive linguistics and evolutionary anthropology.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • English
  • Government & Politics
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology

Etiquette and naked strangers in Homer's Odyssey

Department of Greek & Latin

Lecture and Seminar

"What’s the best way for a naked man to introduce himself to a foreign princess? How do you avoid being turned into a pig when dining with a witch - or escape being eaten when supping with the Cyclops?

The Greek hero Odysseus will be our guide to the perils of ancient cooking, courtship and colonialism in and around the Mediterranean as we examine Homer’s account of his long journey home more than 2,700 years ago.

We’ll discuss how the Odyssey depicts feasting, foreigners and nationality, before considering why the Greeks later saw the world as divided between themselves and Barbarians."

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • Ancient History
  • Classical Civilisation
  • Classical Greek
  • History
  • Latin

A Bull or an Elephant? Translation as intercultural communication

UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies

Lecture & Seminar

The “bull in a china shop” turns to be an “elephant” in the same idiom in Polish. “Skating on thin ice” bceomes “walking around in a thin robe” and “beating around the bush” is “wrapping in cotton”. Idioms are illogical, inflexible, hard and fast collocations: they do not make sense as a sum of meanings of the given words. The meaning of the idioms is specified with almost no connection to any particular meaning of the words – only some distant metaphorical logic may apply. Nevertheless, we all use idioms, these irrational utterances: to know a language well is to be able to use idiomatic expressions correctly and in their proper context. 

What happens when two languages exists closely alongside each other? The bull and the elephant stop having distinctive features and intermingle easily; one can skate in a thin robe and beat around the cotton. Idioms merge and twist as if in a poetic gesture – since poetry is the only field where fiddling with idioms is allowed. Does communication however suffer from these confusions? What happens to the languages themselves? How do translations of idioms work? Or can they be translated? Maybe multi-linguistic communication is derived from the nuances of idiomatic expressions? Why deal with a bull or an elephant when we can just be clumsy?

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • An ancient language
  • A modern language
  • English Language
  • English Literature

The language of culture the culture of language

UCL English

Lecture & Seminar

How does the way we use language reflect our cultural background? What happens when people use the same language differently and how are these differences represented in sources of linguistic and social authority? 

During these sessions, we will take a linguistic approach to thinking about the meaning of the word culture and how it is represented in contemporary society. The representation of slang and non-standard varieties of English will be the focus of the seminar, when we take a closer look at the ways in which dictionaries are made. You will be encouraged to discuss contemporary language use in your own cultural communities and together we will debate the ethical issues which surround word definition today.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • A modern language
  • English Language
  • English Literature
  • English Literature and Language

What's in a word?

UCL Italian

Lecture & Seminar

Words are central to human language, as sentences are formed out of words. But what about the words themselves? Are they the minimal units of language? As we will see in this lecture words can be decomposed into further smaller units which our mind is able to combine together into complete words using extremely simple systematic rules for word building.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying:
  • A modern language
  • English Language
  • English Language and Literature

Suitable for students who are interested in studying:

  • Any language
  • Anthropology
  • Classics/ Classical World Studies
  • English
  • Linguistics
  • Slavonic and East European Studies

Read the eligibility criteria and make an application.

Human Wellbeing - Friday, 18th July 2014

This conference will examine what it means to be "well" as wellness in the body may not always lead to wellness in the mind and what's good for some is rarely ever good for all.

View the schedule for the day.

Safeguarding newborn babies: screening neonatal jaundice with digital photography

UCL Department of Medical Physics & Bioengineering

Introductory Lecture

A lot of us turned “yellow” in the first few days after birth, a rather common condition known as neonatal jaundice. It is caused by the accumulation of yellow-coloured bilirubin in the blood. This condition can often get better by itself but in some serious cases phototherapy treatment would be necessary. This talk tells the story of how we attempt to identify pathologically jaundiced newborn babies by analysing the colour of their eyes, with the help of a range of STEM related subjects including digital photography, colour science, image processing, statistical analysis and computer programming.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying: 
  • Biology 
  • Chemistry 
  • Maths 
  • Physics

Plato on Human Flourishing

UCL Department of Philosophy

Lecture & Seminar

All ancient Greeks – from the cobbler to the general to the philosopher – believed that the point of life, and its highest goal, was a state or activity called eudaimonia. Arguably, the best way to understand this concept nowadays is to think of it as flourishing, doing well over the long-term, as opposed to a transient state of happiness. Plato thought that this life consists in being the best you can be: being excellent or virtuous. He also developed a three-part model of human psychology, with each of the three parts as the source of basic and irreducible kinds of human desire and goals. The way to achieve virtue, Plato thought, was to properly develop these parts of ourselves so that the kinds of desires that belong to each is satisfied, but in a way that harmonises the parts and unifies the whole person. Flourishing, for Plato, was in this sense a kind of mental health.

You may be interested in this masterclass if you are studying:
  • History
  • English
  • Government and Politics
  • Philosophy
  • Sociology

Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic

UCL School of Pharmacy

Lecture & Seminar

Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus are related diseases that are sweeping the World in epidemic proportions. There is little doubt that this is the result of increased intake of a high calorie fast food diet coupled to the 'thrifty genome' that has been advantageous in human evolution. This seminar/lecture will explore the causes of, and therapies for, this global epidemic.

You may be interested in this if you are currently studying: 
  • Biology
  • Chemistry

Public attitudes to development aid

UCL Department of Political Science

Lecture & Seminar

In 2010 the Coalition Government’s decision to ‘ring-fence’ aid spending pushed it into the national spotlight. The ensuing political debate addressed whether ‘charity begins at home’ and prioritizing the poor in Britain vs. the poor abroad. Was it right to protect aid spending? This session examines public opinion and overseas aid. Drawing on recent national survey data, we consider the following questions:

  • How concerned are the public about poverty in developing countries?
  • How much do the public think is spent on aid?
  • How much should be spent on aid?
  • How much do the public know about overseas aid?
  • How do perceptions of corruption and waste affect support for aid?
You may be interested in this masterclass if you are studying:
  • History
  • English
  • Government and Politics
  • Mathematics
  • Philosophy
  • Sociology

Is sport really good for us?

UCL School of European Languages, Culture & Society

Lecture & Seminar

Is sport really good for us? The physical and mental benefits of sport and exercise are often noted; politicians and sporting organisations are keen to tell us that sport can keep us physically fit and healthy. But beyond the supposed medical and health benefits, what role can sport play in human wellbeing? Is sport a useful social tool for bringing people together or something that blinds us to the inherent nationalist, capitalist and discriminatory nature of modern society? Is sport something that encourages human expression, or something that constricts us within certain patterns, orders and rules? Does it promote health or physical self-abuse? These are questions which different people have attempted to answer looking at social theory and historical examples. In this session we will consider what sport is, how it is different to other forms of exercise, how it can bring people together or tear them apart, and how it can limit or promote your own wellbeing.

You may be interested in this masterclass if you are studying:
  • A modern language
  • History
  • Government and Politics
  • Philosophy
  • Sociology

Suitable for students who are interested in studying:

  • Applied Medical Sciences
  • Human Sciences
  • Philosophy
  • Pharmacy
  • Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering
  • Politics, Philosophy and Economics
  • Science and Technology Studies
  • Slavonic and East European Studies

Read the eligibility criteria and make an application.

2012 Conference

Eligibility Guidelines

We ask that students meet the following academic criteria when applying for an activity:

  • have achieved at least five A/A*s at GCSE
  • are likely to achieve a minimum of ABB at A level or
  • at least 34 points at IB (please note that for subject specific activity students must be on track to meet the degree programme’s minimum entry requirements)
  • are taking at least two subjects from UCL's list of preferred A levels.

Our post-16 activities are funded by UCL’s Access Agreement and Widening Participation funds and are aimed at gifted and talented students from underrepresented backgrounds who might not otherwise apply to UCL. Students must be attending a state school and priority will be given to students who meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • will be the first generation in their family to attend university
  • come from neighbourhoods with low overall progression rates to higher educationin
  • local authority care
  • parents from non-professional occupations
  • have been eligible for free school meals within the past five years.