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  • Start date: September 2017

Philosophy and Greek BA

This degree aims to provide an understanding of a range of central philosophical debates, together with a detailed education in Ancient Greek language and culture. All major areas of philosophy are available for study, drawing upon the writings of philosophers both ancient and modern to place your studies in context.

Key information

UCAS code
VQ57
Duration
3 years
Application deadline
15 January 2017
Applications per place
6 (2015 entry)*
Total intake
65 (2017 entry)*
* Figures relate to Philosophy subject area

Entry requirements

A levels

Grades
AAA
Subjects
No specific subjects.
GCSEs
English Language at grade B, plus Mathematics at grade C; Ancient Greek is also preferred. For UK-based students, a grade C or equivalent in a foreign language (other than Ancient Greek, Biblical Hebrew or Latin) is required. UCL provides opportunities to meet the foreign language requirement following enrolment, further details at: www.ucl.ac.uk/ug-reqs

IB Diploma

Points
38
Subjects
A total of 18 points in three higher level subjects, with no score below 5.

UK applicants qualifications

For entry requirements with other UK qualifications accepted by UCL, choose your qualification from the list below:

Equivalent qualification

Not acceptable for entrance to this programme

Pass in Access to HE Diploma, with a minimum of 23 credits awarded with Distinction in the Level 3 units, the remainder of the Level 3 units awarded with Merit.

D3,D3,D3 in three Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subjects

A,A,A at Advanced Highers (or A,A at Advanced Higher and A,A,A at Higher)

Successful completion of the WBQ Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate plus 2 GCE A-Levels at grades AAA.

International applications

In addition to A level and International Baccalaureate, UCL considers a wide range of international qualifications for entry to its undergraduate degree programmes.

Undergraduate Preparatory Certificates

The Undergraduate Preparatory Certificates (UPCs) are intensive one-year foundation courses for international students of high academic potential who are aiming to gain access to undergraduate degree programmes at UCL and other top UK universities.

Typical UPC students will be high achievers in a 12-year school system which does not meet the standard required for direct entry to UCL.

For more information see: www.ucl.ac.uk/upc.

English language requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency. Information about the evidence required, acceptable qualifications and test providers can be found on our English language requirements page.

The English language level for this programme is: Advanced

A variety of English language programmes are offered at the UCL Centre for Languages & International Education.

Degree benefits

  • UCL Philosophy was one of the top-rated departments in the UK in the most recent (2014) Research Excellence Framework. The research interests of the academic staff are wide-ranging, covering all the main areas of philosophy.
  • You will study Greek in one of the top three Classics departments in the UK, according to the 2015 Guardian Universities League Table
  • A rich array of extracurricular philosophy events is available in London. As a UCL philosophy student you will be able to attend the meetings of the Royal Institute of Philosophy, the Aristotelian Society and the University of London's Institute of Philosophy.

Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Philosophy.

  • 75% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.

Degree structure

In each year of your degree you will take a number of individual modules, normally valued at 0.5 or 1.0 credits, adding up to a total of 4.0 credits for the year. Modules are assessed in the academic year in which they are taken. The balance of compulsory and optional modules varies from programme to programme and year to year. A 1.0 credit is considered equivalent to 15 credits in the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS).

The first year includes several introductory lecture courses, which provide a foundation for later studies. The programme covers political philosophy, examining questions about the state, liberty and laws; moral philosophy, questioning distinctions of right and wrong, and our motivation for choosing between the two; epistemology which investigates the nature of knowledge and belief; metaphysics, which attempts to grasp the nature of things; and logic, which imparts principles of sound reasoning.

You will study Philosophy and Greek on an equal basis. Optional modules in Latin are also offered.

Modules

An indicative guide to the structure of this programme, year by year.

Compulsory modules

All first year modules are optional.

Optional modules

You will select 4.0 credits of optional modules, including:
2.0 credits of Greek and Latin modules

Four philosophy modules from the following:
Introduction to the History of Philosophy I
Introduction to the History of Philosophy II
Introduction to Logic I
Introduction to Logic II
Introduction to Moral Philosophy
Introduction to Political Philosophy
Knowledge and Reality
Philosophy Tutoria: Texts and Debate

Compulsory modules

All second year modules are optional.

Optional modules

You will select 4.0 credits of optional modules, including:

2.0 credits of Greek and Latin modules

Four optional modules from Philosophy, including modules from at least two of the groups A, B, and C:

Group A
Theoretical Philosophy (e.g. Knowledge; Metaphysics; Mind and Body; Language)

Group B
Normative Philosophy (e.g. Aesthetics; Applied Ethics; Global Justice and Health; Morality and Literature; Normative Ethics; Political Philosophy)

Group C
History of Philosophy (Aristotle; Plato; Marxism; Nietzsche; Wittgenstein; Sartre)

Compulsory modules

All third year modules are optional.

Optional modules

You will select 4.0 credits of optional modules, including:

2.0 credits of Greek and Latin modules

2.0 credits from the wide range of philosophy modules available.

Your learning

Our teaching is based on lectures and seminars that complement each other. In your first year, you will be introduced to the basic elements of philosophical reasoning through lectures, seminars and small-group tutorial classes. In years two and three your chosen courses will be taught by an expert from within our department through a combination of lectures, related seminars and classes.

Assessment

Assessment is by a mixture of coursework (essays) and written examination. You may also elect to submit a dissertation as one of your philosophy options.

Further Information

Detailed course descriptions are available on the department website: Philosophy and Greek BA.

Careers

This programme will assist you in constructing and assessing philosophical positions and arguments, thereby teaching you how to analyse and present complex ideas. Furthermore, it will provide you with an understanding of a wide range of traditional and contemporary philosophical theories. Such skills are transferable to non-philosophical contexts.

The discipline of philosophical training, and in particular its emphasis on rigorous argumentation, logic, and clarity of thought and expression, makes philosophy graduates highly suitable for a wide variety of careers.

Many recent UCL graduates have excelled in the legal profession, training as both solicitors and barristers, while others have entered publishing, journalism, finance, the civil service, Parliament, or local government. Philosophy graduates are also sought after as programmers and systems analysts. A high proportion of students go on to further study in philosophy.

Destinations

First career destinations of recent graduates (2012-2014) of this programme and other related Philosophy programmes include:

  • Graduate Trainee, KPMG
  • Full-time student, MSt in Philosophy at the University of Oxford
  • Future Leader, Barclays
  • Full-time student, BPhil in Philosophy at the University of Oxford
  • Journalist, Banbury Guardian (2011)

*Data taken from the 'Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education' survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2012-2014 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

UCL is commited to helping you get the best start after graduation. Read more about how UCL Careers, UCL Advances and other entrepreneur societies here: Careers and skills.

Fees and funding

Tuition fees

The fees indicated are for undergraduate entry in the 2016/17 academic year.

UK/EU students
£9,000 (2016/17)
Overseas students
£16,130 (2016/17)

Fees for students entering UCL in September 2017 (i.e. for the 2017/2018 academic year) will be set in the summer of 2016 and published on the UCL Current Students website. Fees advertised by UCL are for the first year of the programme. UK/EU undergraduate fees are capped, but fees for other students may be subject to increase in future years of study by between 3-5%.

Funding

Various funding options are available, including student loans, scholarships and bursaries. UK students whose household income falls below a certain level may also be eligible for a non-repayable bursary or for certain scholarships. Please see the Fees and funding pages for more details.

Departmental scholarships

The Scholarships and Funding website lists scholarships and funding schemes available to UCL students. These may be open to all students, or restricted to specific nationalities, regions or academic department.

Application and next steps

Your application

In addition to looking for outstanding grades in your academic record, we also assess your application for evidence of your ability to engage with philosophical arguments, your skills in reasoning, and your facility with languages and linguistics.

How to apply

Application for admission should be made through UCAS (the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service). Applicants currently at school or college will be provided with advice on the process; however, applicants who have left school or who are based outside the United Kingdom may obtain information directly from UCAS.

Application deadline: 15 January 2017



Selection

Selection will be made on the basis of information contained in the UCAS application: achieved and predicted academic grades, the level of interest in, motivation towards, and experience of the subject as indicated in the personal statement, the reference supplied, and any relevant contextual factors.

In addition applicants may be asked from time to time to provide further information, such as AS module results, or a response to a questionnaire.

For further information on UCL's selection process see: Selection of students

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