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  • Start date: September 2019

History of Art BA

UCL is one of the most exciting places to study history of art in the country. This programme aims to develop your knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and material culture, covering a wide range of visual imagery and making use of London's extensive public collections, libraries, museums and architecture.

Key Information

Programme starts

September 2019
UCAS code
V350
Duration
Full-time: 3 years
Application deadline
15 January 2019
Location
London, Bloomsbury

Entry requirements

A Levels

Grades
AAA
Subjects
No specific subjects, though essay-based subjects are an advantage.
Grades
(contextual offer)
ABB (more about contextual offers)
Subjects
(contextual offer)
No specific subjects, though essay-based subjects are an advantage.
GCSEs
English Language at grade B or 6, plus Mathematics at grade C or 5. For UK-based students a foreign language at grade B or 6 is required.

IB Diploma

Points
38
Subjects
A score of 18 points in three higher level subjects, with no score lower than 5.
Points
(contextual offer)
34 (more about contextual offers)
Subjects
(contextual offer)
A score of 16 points in three higher level subjects, with no score lower than 5.

UK applicants qualifications

For entry requirements with other UK qualifications accepted by UCL, choose your qualification from the list below:

Equivalent qualification

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF) or BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (RQF - teaching from 2016) with Distinction, Distinction, Distinction.

Pass in Access to HE Diploma, with 23 credits awarded with distinction in the Level 3 units, the remainder of the Level 3 units with Merit.

D3,D3,D3 in three Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subjects.

AAA at Advanced Highers (or AA at Advanced Higher and AAA at Higher).

Successful completion of the WBQ Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate plus 2 GCE A-Levels at grades AAA

International applications

In addition to A level and International Baccalaureate, UCL considers a wide range of international qualifications for entry to its undergraduate degree programmes.

Undergraduate Preparatory Certificates

UCL Undergraduate Preparatory Certificates (UPCs) are intensive one-year foundation courses for international students of high academic potential who are aiming to gain access to undergraduate degree programmes at UCL and other top UK universities.

Typical UPC students will be high achievers in a 12-year school system which does not meet the standard required for direct entry to UCL.

For more information see: www.ucl.ac.uk/upc.

English language requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency. Information about the evidence required, acceptable qualifications and test providers can be found on our English language requirements page.

The English language level for this programme is: Good

A variety of English language programmes are offered at the UCL Centre for Languages & International Education.

Degree benefits

  • High-quality research undertaken by staff, which is reflected in our research excellence profile, informs the content of our undergraduate degrees, keeping our teaching at the forefront of the discipline.

  • We have specialists on all periods from the medieval onwards, with particular strengths in the study of contemporary art, as well as experts in the history of materials and technologies.

  • UCL Art Museum houses an important collection of artworks, which is used regularly to support our teaching. These include works by Turner and Rembrandt, as well as important 20th-century prints. The UCL Institute of Making is also sometimes used in our teaching.

  • UCL's central location in London is within walking distance of the British Museum and British Library and provides easy access to the National Gallery, the Tate Galleries and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Degree structure

In each year of your degree you will take a number of individual modules, normally valued at 15 or 30 credits, adding up to a total of 120 credits for the year. Modules are assessed in the academic year in which they are taken. The balance of compulsory and optional modules varies from programme to programme and year to year. A 30-credit module is considered equivalent to 15 credits in the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS).

The programme begins with introductory modules in History of Art and its Objects and foundation modules in history of art, together with a thematic seminar taught mainly in galleries, museums and sites in London. You will continue with modules set mainly within specific periods in the second year, and in the final year you will select special subjects offered within the department.

You will also take modules in a subsidiary subject (anthropology, archaeology, history or philosophy) to help build a solid foundation to comprehend visual culture, both past and present.

In the final year you will write a dissertation, involving independent research.

Modules

An indicative guide to the structure of this programme, year by year.

Core or compulsory module(s)

  • History of Art and its Objects
  • History of European Art (1): Classical to Early Renaissance
  • History of European Art (2): High Renaissance to the Present Day

Students must also take a module in a modern foreign language, preferably in the first year.

Optional modules

You will select one of the following:

  • Thematic Seminar (1): Art and Architecture before 1800
  • Thematic Seminar (2): Art and Architecture after 1800

Further options will be selected in a subsidiary subject: either anthropology, archaeology, history or philosophy.

Core or compulsory module(s)

  • Advanced Lecture Course I: Early Modern Bodies
  • Advanced Lecture Course II: Histories of Photography

(The content of the Advanced Lecture Courses changes regularly. These are the offerings for 2017-18.)

Optional modules

You will select from a wide range of optional modules, including at least two of the following:

  • History of the Category 'Art'
  • Methodologies of Art History
  • Methodologies of Making

Further options can be selected from within History of Art, and from within the same subsidiary subject as Year 1 (anthropology, archaeology, history or philosophy).

Core or compulsory module(s)

Undergraduate Report in History of Art

Optional modules

You will select from a wide range of options including at least one Special Subject. Further options can be selected from within History of Art, and from fields such as anthropology, archaeology, history or philosophy. There is also the option to continue with a language (non-beginners only).


Your learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars, and may include visits to monuments, film archives and sessions in the Material Studies Laboratory. Seminars may relate to a lecture series and involve travel within the UK or abroad. On a more frequent basis, first-year thematic seminars take place at London's many art collections and exhibitions.

Assessment

Coursework, essays, oral participation and written examinations will all be used as means of formal assessment of your work.

Further Information

Detailed course descriptions are available on the department website: History of Art BA.

Careers

The programme is broad and rigorous, making graduates fully competitive for jobs both within and outside the area of visual arts. The department takes seriously the need for students to develop presentational and other skills alongside the specific analytical and interpretive skills associated with history of art.

UCL's History of Art graduates have a record of success in careers in museums and galleries, academia, the art trade, the heritage industry, art publishing, art conservation and teaching. The unique combination of visual sensitivity and intellectual rigour has also proved valuable in journalism, publishing and advertising.

Destinations

First destinations of recent graduates (2013-2015) of this programme include:

  • Curatorial Assistant, The Frieze Art Fair
  • Junior Translator, Sotheby's
  • Communications Assistant, The Independent
  • Parliamentary Researcher, Member of Parliament
  • MA in Art History, Courtauld Institute of Art

Data taken from the 'Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education' survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013-2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

UCL is commited to helping you get the best start after graduation. Read more about how UCL Careers and UCL Innovation and Enterprise can help you find employment or learn about entrepreneurship.

Fees and funding

Tuition fees

The fees indicated are for undergraduate entry in the 2019/20 academic year. The UK/EU fees shown are for the first year of the programme at UCL only. Fees for future years may be subject to an inflationary increase. The Overseas fees shown are the fees that will be charged to 2019/20 entrants for each year of study on the programme, unless otherwise indicated below.

UK/EU students
£9,250 (2019/20)
Overseas students
£19,970 (2019/20)

Full details of UCL's tuition fees, tuition fee policy and potential increases to fees can be found on the UCL Students website.

Funding

Various funding options are available, including student loans, scholarships and bursaries. UK students whose household income falls below a certain level may also be eligible for a non-repayable bursary or for certain scholarships. Please see the Fees and funding pages for more details.

Additional costs

Students are expected to pay the entrance fee to any admission-charging exhibition or museum visited by a class; the tutor will usually negotiate a group discount where this is significantly cheaper than the individual student discount.

If you are concerned by potential additional costs for books, equipment, etc. on this programme, please get in touch with the relevant departmental contact (details given on this page).

Departmental scholarships

The scholarships listed below are for 2018 entry. Funding opportunities for students applying for 2019 entry will be published when they are available.

The Scholarships and Funding website lists scholarships and funding schemes available to UCL students. These may be open to all students, or restricted to specific nationalities, regions or academic department.

Application and next steps

Your application

We welcome applicants who have a serious interest in, and enthusiasm for, the study of art history. Entry is highly competitive, but you will not be required to have studied history of art before. However, advanced study in an essay-based subject such as history or English, as well as a language, would be an advantage.

How to apply

Application for admission should be made through UCAS (the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service). Applicants currently at school or college will be provided with advice on the process; however, applicants who have left school or who are based outside the United Kingdom may obtain information directly from UCAS.

Application deadline: 15 January 2019



Selection

Applicants will be assessed not only on academic achievement, but on evidence of intellectual curiosity, and of critical appreciation of visual culture.

If we are considering making you an offer you will be asked to complete a short written exercise, and then invited to the department on an open day to meet the teaching staff and learn more about the degree programme.

For further information on UCL's selection process see: Selection of students.

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