PhD

Supervision

Every PhD student has a principal and subsidiary supervisor, who will be recorded as such on the Research Student Log. The principal supervisor can be expected to help you orient your research, aiding you to formulate a proper issue or question to work on and to construct a suitable schedule of work towards completion of the thesis; to provide you with advice about suitable reading; to provide detailed feedback on drafts of chapters and related written work. You should expect to meet your primary supervisor fortnightly during term time. You should also discuss your progress and plans with your subsidiary supervisor at least a couple of times over the year. By default the expectation is that supervision will be the responsibility of your subsidiary supervisor when the principal supervisor is on leave; however the Department cannot always guarantee that this will be possible. 

You should be getting regular feedback in supervisory meetings from your supervisor about both the work you submit and your progress overall. If you have problems yourself with your work schedule; or you are worried about preparing for your exams, you should talk in the first instance to your supervisor or the Graduate Tutor. If you feel you need to change supervisor, you should approach the Graduate Tutor, the Graduate Committee or Head of Department as appropriate and talk in confidence. This can be an awkward thing to do, but the relationship you have with your supervisor is central to your development, so it is important that you are supervised by someone that you can work with. If you are facing problems with how things are going with your studies you should try and solve the problem initially within the Department. But you can also look for further help and guidance to the UCL Graduate School and to the Dean of Students (welfare) via UCL Student and Registry Services.

The current supervision list is here.

Supervision List

Spring Term 2014

Showkat Ali Véronique Munoz-Dardé 
Gabriele Badano  James Wilson 
Don Berry  Marcus Giaquinto 
Akosua Bonsu  Sebastian Gardner
Hannah Carnegy-Arbuthnott Véronique Munoz-Dardé
Vanessa Carr  Luke Glynn 
Tony Cheng  Mike Martin 
Henry Clarke  Daniel Rothschild 
Emily Crampton  Fiona Leigh 
Alex Cross  José Zalabardo
Katherine Cuccuru  Mark Kalderon
Jack Davis  Lucy O'Brien 
Max Edwards  TBC
Ben Fardell  Véronique Munoz-Dardé
Peter Faulconbridge  Mike Martin 
Jessica Feely  Tom Stern 
Miguel Ferreira Dos Santos Mark Kalderon
Sam Fremantle  Mike Otsuka - LSE 
Alex Geddes  Mike Martin
Daniel Guillery  Jo Wolff 
Margaret Hampson  Fiona Leigh 
Alec Hinshelwood  Lucy O'Brien 
Sanna Hirvonen  Mark Kalderon 
Dave Holly  Jo Wolff
Andrew Knox  Jo Wolff 
Ed Lamb  Véronique Munoz-Dardé
Ben Martin  José Zalabardo 
Chrissy Meijns  TBC 
Charles Neil José Zalabardo
Ed Nettel  Mark Kalderon 
Helen Robertson  Sebastian Gardner / Mike Martin 
Joshua Rowlands  Han Van Wietmarschen 
Penelope Rowlatt  Paul Snowdon 
Lea Salje  Daniel Morgan / Lucy O'Brien
Sebastian Sanhueza Rodriguez  Mike Martin
Mario Santos-Sousa  Marcus Giaquinto 
Alex Sayegh  Jo Wolff 
Gen Shanahan  Jo Wolff 
Ashley Shaw  Lucy O'Brien 
Rouholamini Shiva Tom Stern 
Tim Short  Lucy O'Brien 
Maarten Steenhagen  Mark Kalderon 
Odne Stenseth  Sebastian Gardner 
Winnie Sung  Lucy O'Brien / Mike Martin
Jonas Vandieken  Véronique Munoz-Dardé
Tom Williams  Mike Martin 
Jonnie Wolff  Daniel Rothschild
Jan Zhou  Mike Martin
Eliana Zur-Szpiro  Véronique Munoz-Dardé

PhD Orientation

Click here for a PDF copy of the welcome document handed out at the beginning of the year with notes about key locations and UCL systems.

UCL Research Student Log

The department has a termly reporting structure which is more intensive than the standard intervals of the UCL Research Student Log. Email reminders will be sent from the department to students and supervisors at the end of each term requesting progress summaries are added to the student log. To upload a summary click on the next available progress stage or, if already at 'prior to thesis submission' add a new entry to this progress stage.

Please read the Student Quick Reference Guide that is linked from the log in screen of the research student log.

Seminars and Reading Groups

Various reading groups and one-off lectures are advertised via the departmental group mailing list gradphil. For instructions how to join this please see the FAQ section here.

Other London based seminars and conferences are organised by the Institute of Philosophy at the School of Advanced Study (University of London). The department has institutional membership to this. The IP website is here.

All research students are expected to attend some sessions of the Recent Philosophical Writings seminar held fortnightly. There is a Moodle site for this module (PHILG009: Recent Philosophical Writings - Senior Seminar) which shows the papers being discussed. Moodle is accessed here

Research students are also invited to attend any of the graduate seminars taking place that are related to their area of research. Seminars are two hours in duration and meet weekly except in the summer term when they often meet twice a week to compensate for the shorter term (7 weeks instead of the usual 10 weeks). A list of courses is available here.

The PhD work in progress seminar runs weekly throughout the year and provides a forum for UCL philosophy PhD candidates to present their research, at any stage, to fellow candidates in a supportive environment. The seminar provides an opportunity to try out and get feedback on new ideas, to stay in touch with the research of other students, to work on presenting skills and to practise chairing sessions. New research students are very welcome to the seminar, which starts in the first week of the autumn term.

Thesis Information

Current Students List

Post Graduate Teaching Assistance and Other Financial Support

PGTA's

The Department appoints PhD students as teaching assistants for undergraduate modules in the first and second year of the BA degree and as small group tutorial teachers for first year BA students. Applications are invited in Spring for positions in the following academic year. We encourage all doctoral students to gain this teaching experience at some point in their studies. This is useful not only from the perspective of applying for teaching jobs in the future, but also feeds into your own research, helping you learn how to present your ideas clearly. There is a training course for teaching assistants at the beginning of each academic year, which is compulsory for everyone who is going to be appointed in that academic year. 


Departmental Scholarships

The Department itself has a small set of funds to offer modest hardship assistance for graduate students in financial need.

The Follett Scholarship Funded by Ken Follett, an alumnus of the Department, is a one-year award of £13,000 available each year. The S.V. Keeling Scholarship is funded through a bequest: it is a scholarship to support research in ancient philosophy, and is equivalent to a full AHRC fees and maintenance award, for up to three years. The Ayer, Dawes Hicks, Jacobsen, Melhuish, and JS Mill scholarships are also funded by bequest, but are much smaller, providing only £500-£1000. 

Provision of paid undergraduate teaching opportunities is the other major way for the Department to offer partial assistance to its students in financial need.  Applications for consideration for departmental hardship and scholarship funds are invited at the same time as applications for teaching opportunities, usually in Spring Term for the following academic year, and these applications are considered together.


Other Sources of Funding

In addition to the above mentioned sources of funding for conference attendance, there are a number of other potential resources for financial assistance more generally: 

The UCL Graduate School has funds to assist with the travel and accommodation costs of presenting at conferences outside London.  Information on beginning the application process can be found here.

UCL’s own Overseas Research Student Awards are available to international students (non-EU) for competition each year. The deadline will fall in February 2013 but these applications require references and substantial paperwork, so should be prepared well in advance of the deadline. For more details see here.

The Royal Institute of Philosophy, which holds philosophical meetings in the vicinity of UCL, also provides fellowships and bursaries for research students. Further details can be found on their website here.

The Analysis Trust normally offers a grant to a completing graduate student every other year. See their website here.

UCL provides a list of other external funding opportunities here

Monitoring and Feedback

The departmental Graduate Committee (GC) has general responsibility for the admission, monitoring, upgrading and guidance of graduate students as well as the structure and content of the various graduate programmes. The committee comprises the Head of Department, Departmental Graduate Tutor, MA Tutor and one or two additional members of staff.

All graduate students receiving individual supervision will be assessed by their supervisors on the basis of their written and oral contributions to supervisory sessions. The assessment will take the form of written comments submitted by the supervisor to the the Research Student Log where students can access these. If a student’s work is deemed unsatisfactory, the Graduate Tutor will contact him/her immediately to discuss the problem. Serious problems will be referred to the GC. The GC will use the termly reports in the Research Student Log to review each student’s progress over the year.

At the end of the academic year, all research (i.e. MPhil Stud, MPhil/PhD and PhD) students meet with members of the GC. This meeting gives students the opportunity to review their progress and to discuss their plans with members of the committee. 

At the end of each term, graduate students must complete the progress report on the Research Student Log in which they provide an assessment of the quality and helpfulness etc. of their supervision that term and other aspects of their course, as well as an assessment of their own progress. Research students should also upload this to the Research Student Log at the end of term to be signed off by their supervisor.

Generally, throughout the course of the year, students are encouraged to be open with members of staff about difficulties they may be experiencing with the course. Normally, they should approach their supervisor, but if this is awkward they should take the matter up with the Graduate Tutor.

The Graduate Tutor will in any case be available to discuss problems and questions students may have. The Staff–Student Consultative Committee meets termly, and its officers are drawn from among the undergraduate and graduate members of the department. Research students are encouraged to raise any issue they wish to discuss concerning courses or the running of the Department in general with their representative to be raised at the termly meetings. 

Completing Research Status

Prior to the PhD thesis being submitted students can register for Completing Research Status where access to UCL facilities is continued whilst fees are not charge for a maximum of one year. If the thesis is not submitted after the end of the CRS registration at UCL is discontinued.  To submit after CRS has expired financial penalties have to be paid and additional evidence from your supervisor will need to be provided to make a case for the thesis to be submitted. It is therefore important you discuss with your supervisor whether it is feasible you can submit before the CRS year expires.

More information about CRS status is available on the current student's website here.

There are minimum registration periods before students can apply for CRS status. For those who have completed the UCL MPhil Stud a minimum of a further two years of full time PhD registration is required. Those who have not completed the UCL MPhil Stud need to have been in full time registration for a minimum of three year. For more information see section 1 of the academic regulations for Research Degree Students here

FAQ


COMPUTING


How do I subscribe to GradPhil?

In order to subscribe to the UCL philosophy graduate mailing list you must send a message with the content SUBSCRIBE GRADPHIL to majordomo@ucl.ac.uk.

How do I connect to Eduroam (the UCL wireless network)?

You can connect to Eduroam using your UCL userid appended with '@ucl.ac.uk' (e.g. ucxxzano@ucl.ac.uk) and your UCL account password. 


UPGRADE


Who needs to upgrade to PhD status?

Student who have completed the UCL two year MPhil Stud are automatically upgraded to PhD status once the thesis viva is confirmed. 

Those who are admitted as a MPhil/PhD student need to complete the probationary year which has two components.
1) Modules (Practical Criticism 1 & 2 and Recent Philosophical Writings plus 5 optional modules - at least 1 from each list of A, B, C - see courses here).  

2) Upgrading report of a draft chapter and research proposal (see below).

How long should the extended essay (draft chapter) be?

The extended essay should be between 5,000 and 7,000 words in length.
What should the upgrade report contain?

The upgrade report comprises an extended research proposal, an outline of proposed chapters and a bibliography.
When should I submit the extended essay and upgrade report?

These should be submitted by Reading Week of the first term of your second year of study.
When will my upgrade viva take place?

Upgrade vivas will be held with the Graduate Committee shortly after submission of the upgrade report and extended essay

SUPERVISION


How is supervision arranged in the MPhil/PhD registered year?

Each MPhil/PhD student is assigned a supervisor from the outset, who plays different roles in the three terms of their first year. In the first term, the student should consult with their supervisor about their plans for the year. In the second term, the student receives three supervisions on an extended essay of between 5,000 and 7,000 words, that is, in effect, a draft chapter of the thesis they intend to write. In the third term, MPhil/ PhD students should consult with their supervisor as needed in preparing the upgrading report.

How is supervision arranged for PhD students?

Every PhD student has a principal and subsidiary supervisor, who will be recorded as such on the Research Student Log. The principal supervisor can be expected to help you orient your research, aiding you to formulate a proper issue or question to work on and to construct a suitable schedule of work towards completion of the thesis; to provide you with advice about suitable reading; to provide detailed feedback on drafts of chapters and related written work. You should expect to meet your primary supervisor fortnightly during term time. You should also discuss your progress and plans with your subsidiary supervisor at least a couple of times over the year. By default the expectation is that supervision will be the responsibility of your subsidiary supervisor when the principal supervisor is on leave; however the Department cannot always guarantee that this will be possible.

What is the end of year 'wash-up' session?

The week after the end of the summer term the graduate committee arranges a short meeting with all research students. The purpose of this brief meeting is to discuss progress and future plans.


Page last modified on 14 aug 13 13:32