UCL News podcast: Getting Plastered at the Slade & Walking with Gosse

1 February 2013

UCL podcast

The UCL News podcast gives you the opportunity to listen to the latest news and research from around UCL every fortnight. Split up into three parts, you can either listen to the podcast all in one go, or save features for later listening.

In the news section this week we are joined by Cath Dean who gives us an update on the Spring 2013 season of Lunch Hour Lectures. This term Wendy Carlin (UCL Economics) will be discussing whether there is a solution to the ongoing Eurozone crisis, and there’s also a lecture on Scandinavian crime drama and Nordic Noir for anyone who’s a fan of the Killing.

Also in the new section we report on news this week for major EU funding for two projects focusing on graphene and the human brain. The Human Brain Project is planned to last ten years and the cost is estimated at 1.19 billion euros. Lastly we mark the inaugural George Orwell Day, which is of particular significance to UCL as our Special Collections hold the George Orwell Archive.

Getting Plastered at the Slade

This week we visit the Slade School of Fine Art to explore the wonders of plaster, and how it’s used in sculpture. Senior lecturer Jo Volley and Professor Ed Allington, head of graduate sculpture at the Slade, explain how they use plaster in their work and why it’s such an enduring, and historically important, medium. A new exhibition, called Plastered, is also currently running at the UCL Art Museum.

Walking with Gosse

Our second feature is an interview with UCL Emeritus Professor Roger Wotton who has written a new book called Walking with Gosse: Natural History, Creation and Religious Conflicts. Philip Henry Gosse was a famous naturalist and science populariser in the 20th Century and is now known as his era’s answer to David Attenborough. We caught up with Professor Wotton to talk about why Gosse was such a fascinating character.

Links:

UCL Lunch Hour Lectures
Human Brain Project
George Orwell Day
UCL Art Museum
Professor Roger Wotton