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IV International Conference Translating Voices, Translating Regions, Conference Series

*** NEW Venue *** University College London, UK More...

Published: Jul 15, 2014 1:24:16 PM

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Humanity and Animality in 20th and 21st Century Culture: Narratives, Theories, Histories. An Interdisciplinary Conference

This interdisciplinary conference takes up an important debate in a field of growing importance in the humanities, where animal studies, post-humanism, and eco-criticism have surged in recent years.The definition of mankind seems necessarily to pass through an understanding of what constitutes the animal. Philosophically, what distinguishes, or indeed brings together humanity and animality has been the subject of debate from Aristotle’s understanding of man as ‘zôon logon echon’ and from Kant’s view of man’s treatment of animals as an insight into the true nature of humankind, Derrida’s seminars on ‘the beast and the sovereign’, up to Agamben’s recent theory of ‘bare life’ as the breakdown of the barrier between man and animal. More...

Starts: Sep 15, 2014 9:00:00 AM

Medical (In)Humanities Workshops: Institutions, Languages & Social Practices

Publication date: Nov 26, 2013 12:06:18 PM

Start: Dec 4, 2013 2:30:00 PM
End: Dec 4, 2013 5:30:00 PM

Location: Room B02, Chandler House, 2 Wakefield Street, London, WC1N 1PF


Guest Speaker: Professor John Foot (Bristol University)

The project ‘Medical (In)humanities’ is a multidisciplinary exploration of the ways in which the practice and theory of medicine has undermined or consolidated notions of humane behaviour.

The title ‘Medical (in)humanities’ is a provocative response to the field of medical humanities and is designed to explore the assumptions underlying the very notion of ‘inhumanity’ in order to define what is humane.

The aim of the project is to open up what is already an inter-disciplinary venture to further  avenues, by bringing together researchers from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds: history, cultural criticism, political theory, socio-linguistics, psychiatry, psychoanalysis and psychology.

Key areas of exploration will be political theory, history, discourses of sovereignty and subjectivity, human rights and security, trauma and empathy, ethics and medical ethics, and the interplay of medicine and culture.

The project is being supported by a grant from the UCL Grand Challenges: Human Wellbeing.