Revolutionary techniques developed by MSSL Imaging scientists show the location of the Beagle 2 Lander on the surface of Mars in the finest detail ever

12 October 2017

Super-resolution restoration technique in image (a) lander, parachute candidate and rear cover candidate arrowed, and zoomed-in view of the lander (b) and parachute target (c). Image credit: MSSL/UCL/HiRISE/NASA

In a paper published this week in the peer review journal from the Royal Society Open Science are details of the image stacking and matching techniques developed by the MSSL imaging group, including Prof. Jan-Peter Muller with PhD student Yu Tao, and work on measuring the reflectances of different surface objects by PhD students Si-Ting Xiong and Kiky Putri.

Lead Author Prof. John Bridges from University of Leicester explains: "The last picture taken of the Mars lander Beagle 2 showed it being successfully ejected from Mars Express on Christmas Day in 2003. But sadly, we never got a signal back from the lander and have ever since tried to work out what happened, and where it is. Eventually we made a breakthrough – and our findings have now been published". Read his full article here https://theconversation.com/how-we-found-our-lost-mars-lander-after-a-decade-of-searching-and-whats-next-85374

The BBC story on Super-Resolution Restoration can be found here http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-36136035

and see animations of the Martian surface revealed in unprecedented detail at our Flickr page https://www.flickr.com/photos/uclnews/sets/72157667609698345

Page last modified on 12 oct 17 16:52