Group members

PostDoctoral Scientists

Dr.Yury Bogdanov

Dr.Yury Bogdanov
I am Senior Research Associate and joined the Molecular Nociception Lab in 2008. My main interests are in the field of the ion channels, receptor trafficking and developing transgenic models to study various pain conditions. During my work in the lab I developed the inducible sensory neuron specific deletor model. This model is used to study the role of specific genes in various pain modalities. My current work is focused on the role of the neurons expressing Nav1.7 sodium channel in various pain conditions. I am also working on the developing of transgenic models to study the wiring of sensory neurons.


Telephone:020 7679 6722, e-Mail: y.bogdanov@ucl.ac.uk

Dr.Jing Zhao

Dr.Jing Zhao
My study is focused on sensory transduction and transmission in peripheral nervous system, especially in pain signalling. I use gene targeting in/transgenic mice as a model, combining molecular biochemistry, electrophysiology and behavioural approaches to identify the genes or molecules involved and to understand the molecular, cellular physiological and pathological mechanisms involved. Currently I am investigating 1) the trafficking of sodium channel Nav1.7, 2) the role of BDNF in chronic pain, 3) the function of microRNA in pain signalling and 4) the role of sodium channel Nav1.8 in cardiac conduction.


Telephone:020 7679 6722, e-Mail: jing02.zhao@ucl.ac.uk

Dr.James Cox

Dr.James Cox
I am a MRC Research Career Development Fellow focussing on the genetic basis of human pain. We study families with rare inherited pain disorders (either with pain insensitivity or chronic pain conditions). By sequencing the genome of our patients with pain disorders we aim to identify novel gene mutations. This enables us to highlight genes and pathways that are critical for normal pain sensation and potentially reveal new analgesic drug targets..


Telephone:020 7679 6704, e-Mail: j.j.cox@wibr.ucl.ac.uk

Dr.Abdella Habib

Dr.Abdella Habib
The long term goal of our study is to develop better pain killers. To this end, we study families with extreme forms of pain-sensing disorders. I am currently investigating candidate and/or new genes and pathways that we recently identified using human genetics and a variety of in vivo, in vitro and biochemical approaches. This investigation is carried out in close collaboration with Dr James Cox. We plan to expand and develop these novel observations with a view to improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying pain sensing. .


Telephone:020 7679 6704, e-Mail: a.habib@ucl.ac.uk

Dr.Kathryn Quick

Dr.Kathryn Quick
I am investigating the involvement of TRP channels, particularly TRPC channels, in mechanosensation and hearing. I am using cell expression systems and transgenics to look at the function and mechanism of TRP channels in order to enhance our understanding of mechanotransduction.


Telephone:020 7679 6722, e-Mail: k.quick@ucl.ac.uk

Dr Jeffrey Vernon

Dr Jeffrey Vernon
My experiments have focused on ion channels and receptors in the nervous system, and the way they contribute to signalling and behaviour. Currently I am working on a gene delivery method for in vivo overexpression or knockdown studies. In this way I will test the role of expression or mutation of candidate genes in susceptibility or insensitivity to pain.


Telephone:020 7679 6725, e-Mail: j.vernon@ucl.ac.uk

Dr.Robert Werdehausen

Dr.Robert Werdehausen
As a medical doctor, I am training to become a specialist in anaesthesia, intensive care, emergency and pain medicine. Being funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), I was given the chance to focus on research with a full-time post for two years. In general, I am interested in spinal and peripheral mechanisms of pain and touch perception. In particular, I am investigating the effects of local and general anaesthetics on chronic pain development. In previous projects I focused on the neurotoxic effects of local and general anaesthetics as well as on new techniques in regional anaesthesia and interventional pain medicine.


Telephone:020 7679 6722, e-Mail: r.werdehausen@ucl.ac.uk

Dr Stephane Lolignier

Dr Stephane Lolignier
I work on the understanding of mechanotransduction, the basis of touch and mechanical pain (joint pain, pressure-induced pain etc.), within peripheral sensory neurons. I work mostly in vitro, looking for the genes and pathways that lead to the sense of pressure at the cellular level using electrophysiological recordings in cell lines or cultured sensory neurons, with the help of molecular cloning and pharmacology.


Telephone:020 7679 0793, e-Mail: s.lolignier@ucl.ac.uk

Dr Minee-Liane Choi

Dr Minee-Liane Choi
I joined the molecular nociception group and now work on exploring a mysterious channel in mechanosensation which is particularly responsible for noxious stimuli. I am also interested in understanding the disease condition in which patients are suffering from the aberrant pain sense such as Fabry disease. Calcium imaging, in-vitro cellular transfection and animal behavioural assessment are the most frequently used laboratory techniques for my current research..


Telephone:020 7679 6722, e-Mail rmgzmec@ucl.ac.uk

 

 

 

Technical Support

Mr. Sam.Gossage

Mr. Sam Gossage
As Laboratory Manager my main role is to ensure the smooth running of the scientific service functions within the Laboratory, leading the delivery of services in strategic and operational matters and providing advice, guidance and support on a wide range of administrative issues within the group.


Telephone:020 7679 6855, e-Mail s.gossage@ucl.ac.uk

Mrs Martine Gringhuis

Mrs Martine Gringhuis
My work consist of the isolation and culturing of primary dorsal root ganglions and the culturing and transfecting of a wide range of cell lines, which includes stable transfections. Most of these are used for electrophysiological recordings. Besides that I am involved in cloning and preparing DNA for in vitro use and analysing levels of DNA, RNA and protein that are of interest in our pain research.


Telephone:020 7679 6742, e-Mail a.gringhuis@ucl.ac.uk

Miss Sonia Santana

Miss Sonia Santana
After finishing my master's degree in Biochemistry at Universidad de Salamanca in1996, I have been specializing in the development of different kind of physiological models. Currently focused in gene targeting/transgenic pain models. Including surgical procedures, neuronal cultures and cell lines, tissue preparation and processing, genotyping and other bio molecular techniques, as well as the consequent computerised data analysis and recording.


Telephone:020 7679 6742, e-Mail s.santana@ucl.ac.uk