Latest Medical Sciences News

Drink less for a healthier heart

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Drinking wine

A reduction in alcohol consumption, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, could be linked to improved cardiovascular health, including a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, lower body mass index and blood pressure, according to new research published in the BMJ.

Working with Camden Council to get children active

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Camden Active Spaces playground design for Torriano Infants and Junior School

An initiative to see if playground design can inspire schoolchildren to be more active, Camden Active Spaces, is launched today at the Institute of Sport Exercise and Health (ISEH) in partnership with UCL and Camden Council.

Diabetes treatments ‘do more harm than good’ for many people

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Insulin injections for people with type 2 diabetes may cause more harm than good

Treatments to reduce blood sugar levels do more harm than good in many type 2 diabetes patients, particularly older people, finds new research from UCL, the University of Michigan and the Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Hospital.

Queen’s Birthday Honours for the UCL community

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David Fish

A number of people from the UCL community have been recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

Immune system implicated in dementia development

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Frontotemporal Dementia map

The immune system and body’s response to damaged cells play a key role in the development of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), finds new UCL-led research.

Leukaemia drug found to stimulate immunity against many cancer types

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Mice without p110delta survived cancer significantly longer

A class of drug currently being used to treat leukaemia has the unexpected side-effect of boosting immune responses against many different cancers, reports a new study led by scientists at UCL and the Babraham Institute, Cambridge.

‘Map of pain’ reveals how our ability to identify the source of pain varies across the body

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Demonstration of spatial acuity test

“Where does it hurt?” is the first question asked to any person in pain.

A new UCL study defines for the first time how our ability to identify where it hurts, called “spatial acuity”, varies across the body, being most sensitive at the forehead and fingertips.

New Dean for UCL Faculty of Life Sciences

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Geraint Rees, Director of the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience has been appointed to the next Dean of the Faculty of Life Sciences, with effect from 1 September 2014.

New study investigates health problems disproportionately affecting migrants

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aMASE study logo

People living away from their home country are more vulnerable to certain health problems, so a new study co-led by UCL researchers aims to identify and address the issues that they face accessing healthcare in Europe.

UCL professor wins Kavli Prize in Neuroscience

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Professor John O'Keefe

The 2014 Kavli Prize in Neuroscience was today awarded to Professor John O’Keefe, Director of the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour at UCL and affiliated faculty member in the UCL Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology.

New epilepsy treatment offers ‘on demand’ seizure suppression

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The new technique could see people with epilepsy taking pills to control seizures

A new treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy with the potential to suppress seizures ‘on demand’ with a pill, similar to how you might take painkillers when you feel a headache coming on, has been developed by UCL researchers funded by the Wellcome Trust.

Blood vessel research offers insights into new treatments for eye diseases

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Human eye

Leukaemia drugs could help to improve treatments for blindness caused by abnormal blood vessel growth in the eye, finds new UCL research.

E-cigarette use for quitting smoking is associated with improved success rates

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E-cigarette user

People attempting to quit smoking without professional help are approximately 60% more likely to report succeeding if they use e-cigarettes than if they use willpower alone or over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapies such as patches or gum, finds a large UCL survey of smokers in England. 

UCL commits to openness about animal research

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A research animal at UCL

UCL formally committed today to a policy of openness about animal research when Professor Michael Arthur (UCL President & Provost) signed the Concordat on Openness on Animal Research in the UK.

Vitamin B3 treatment for ataxia shows promise in first human trial

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Pills

A form of vitamin B3 has shown early promise against Friedreich’s ataxia, a debilitating degenerative disease with no treatment or cure, in the first human trial of the treatment involving UCL researchers.

Genetics explain why some boys and girls are bigger than others

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By the age of ten, some children have already become obese

The influence of genetic factors on differences between children's Body Mass Index (BMI) increases from 43% at age 4 to 82% at age 10, reports a new study by researchers at UCL and King's College London.

Medical Poetics: call for entries for Yale-UCL Medicine poetry competition

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medicinepoetry

This year's Yale-UCL poetry competition is now open for entries from medical students looking to render their Aesculapian experiences in verse… and win £1000.

Mayor launches MedCity with £4.1m investment

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UCL Quad and UCL Hospital

The Mayor of London today launched MedCity, a partnership between UCLPartners, King’s Health Partners, Imperial College AHSC, Oxford, Cambridge and the Greater London Authority, to establish London and the Greater South East as a world-leading cluster for life sciences.

Light-activated neurons from stem cells restore function to paralysed muscles

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Diagram of optical muscle control system

A new way to artificially control muscles using light, with the potential to restore function to muscles paralysed by conditions such as motor neuron disease and spinal cord injury, has been developed by scientists at UCL and King’s College London.

Quality early childhood programs help prevent chronic diseases in later life

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Family

Disadvantaged children who attend high-quality early childhood development programs including healthcare and nutrition have significantly improved health as adults, reports a new study.

Cell-saving drugs could reduce brain damage after stroke

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Capillaries showing pericytes in purple

Long-term brain damage caused by stroke could be reduced by saving cells called pericytes that control blood flow in capillaries, reports a new UCL-led study.

Shorter sleepers are over-eaters

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Baby sleeping

Young children who sleep less eat more, which can lead to obesity and related health problems later in life, reports a new study by UCL researchers.

Statins could help control multiple sclerosis

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Dr Jeremy Chataway

A high dose of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin significantly reduces brain shrinkage in people with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), found researchers supported by the Biomedical Research Centre at UCL and UCLH, with colleagues from Imperial College London, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Brighton and Sussex Medical School.

Three quarters of people with seasonal and pandemic flu have no symptoms

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Masked train passengers in Mexico City during 2009 Swine Flu outbreak

Around 1 in 5 of the population were infected in both recent outbreaks of seasonal flu and the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, but just 23% of these infections caused symptoms, and only 17% of people were ill enough to consult their doctor, according to new UCL-led research.

Information overload acts ‘to dim the lights’ on what we see

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300sq RAF Pilot Training in Cockpit of Nimrod Aircraft

Too much visual information causes a phenomenon known as ‘load induced blindness’, with an effect akin to dimming the lights, reports a new UCL study.

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