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The UCL Media Relations team is the university’s central press office.


We connect journalists to expert academics and promote UCL research and teaching throughout the global media.


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Archive of Opinion

<< 2013 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 >>

Is sending shoppers ads by Bluetooth just a bit creepy?

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Using Bluetooth wireless networking to send information to nearby smartphones, beacon technology could transform how retailers engage with their customers. But customers will notice how their information is used to personalise these unsolicited adverts, and companies that fail to respect their privacy may get burned, writes Dr Charlene Jennett (UCL Interaction Centre) & Professor Angela Sasse (UCL Computer Science) in The Conversation.

Europe needs gas and Russia needs cash, so expect an energy-fuelled reconciliation

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The Ukraine crisis caused relations between Russia and the EU to fall to their lowest point since the Cold War. But despite the bickering and outright conflicts, both still need each other: Europe relies on Russian gas to keep warm, and Russia in turn needs revenues. With winter on its way and capital flight from Russia reaching dangerous levels, the outlook should draw the EU and Russia back together, writes Dr Catalina Spataru and Professor Raimund Bleischwitz (UCL Bartlett School of Environment, Energy & Resources) in The Conversation.

London is a scientific powerhouse – and it’s about more than Nobel Prizes

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Stephen Caddick

London is fortunate in having a record in ground-breaking science that other cities can only envy. We have a long and proud history of research which we should strive to maintain, for the good of our society, and for the good of our city too. Investing in science will pay richer dividends, in every sense, than any of us can imagine, writes Professor Stephen Caddick (UCL Vice-Provost, Enterprise & London) in City AM.

Islamic State: no-one wants to talk to terrorists, but we always do – and sometimes it works

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The Islamic State (IS) now occupies significant swaths of Iraq and Syria, has pushed as far as the border with Turkey, and has succeeded in dragging “the West” into two civil wars in the Middle East. The West’s offensive, spearheaded by the US and supported by the UK and others, is to “degrade and ultimately destroy” IS. But in the face of IS’s state-building efforts, that strategy will only work if it manages to degrade the group’s legitimacy as a governing enterprise, writes Dr Kristin Bakke (UCL Political Science) in The Conversation.

Eugenics: the academy's complicity

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Nathaniel

“The British invented racism,” said the UK’s first “black female” MP. “Britain…almost invented racism,” said the US’ first “black male” ambassador to the UN. If by “racism” we mean “the science of improving stock”, by “giv[ing] to the more suitable races or strains of blood a better chance of prevailing speedily over the less suitable”, then Diane Abbott in April 1988 and Andrew Young in April 1977 were right: the British invented eugenics. More precisely, the University of London invented national eugenics, in the service of the British Empire, writes Dr Nathaniel Adam Tobias Coleman (UCL Philosophy) in THE.

First goal of UN sustainability targets should be to not conflict with each other

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The UN’s proposed sustainability targets are riddled with conflicts that could make them ineffective or outright harmful. In theory, there is nothing wrong with such targets. After all, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) had mixed success on health, education and poverty but established the principle that measuring key indicators was a good way to at least begin tackling major issues, writes Lucien Georgeson and Professor Mark Maslin (UCL Geography) in The Conversation.

Humans drained the Aral Sea once before – but there are no free refills this time round

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Anson Mackay

The Aral Sea has reached a new low, literally and figuratively; new satellite images from NASA show that, for the first time in its recorded history, the largest basin has completely dried up, writes Professor Anson Mackay (UCL Geography) in The Conversation.

Space: the financial frontier – how citizen scientists took control of a spaceship

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For decades, space exploration remained a domain within reach of only government agencies, who could command huge pools of expertise and public funds. Now the means by which our space endeavours are funded have become more diverse, and more and more private space initiatives are appearing, writes Dr Geraint Jones (UCL MSSL) in The Conversation.

Building a new economics for the #Occupy generation

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After the global financial crisis in 2008, economics was in disarray. Even the Queen was moved to chide economists for failing to warn about the build-up of debt in households and banks in the major economies and the threat this posed to the global economy. She might have added that few economists provided convincing accounts of why the meltdown had happened. And some advocated policies in its wake that made things worse, writes Professor Wendy Carlin (UCL Economics) in The Conversation.

<< 2013 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 >>