Media Relations

Twitter iconYouTube iconFacebook iconSoundCloudiTunes badge

Call us: +44 (0)20 7679 9041


The UCL Media Relations team is the university’s central press office.


We connect journalists to expert academics and promote UCL research and teaching throughout the global media.


More contact information



Opinion

Mansion tax: The real losers of Labour’s policy may never be identified

Publication date:

Ormerod

An exciting email pinged into my inbox at the end of last week. It was a link to the contents of the latest issue of the American Economic Association’s journal Economic Policy. For most people, these publications are not usually as gripping as, say, a Ken Follett novel. But nestling among the thickets of algebra, there was an article entitled “Mansion Tax: the Effect on the Residential Real Estate Market”, writes Dr Paul Ormerod (UCL Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology) in City AM.

It’s time to talk about council tax

Publication date:

Stephen Smith

Election campaigning can reveal more by what is left unsaid than by the pledges that are made. No serious strategy towards taxation is disclosed by the Conservatives’ pledges not to raise the rates of the main revenue-raising taxes; nor are all three major parties’ commitments to raising substantial extra revenues from a clampdown on tax evasion and avoidance a coherent and credible account of how future revenue needs will be met, writes Professor Stephen Smith (UCL Economics) in Prospect Magazine.

Campus cranes and vanity projects with an American flavour

Publication date:

quad

The cranes are going up all over universities. A new student village here, an extension to the business school there, airy atria everywhere, even a scattering of “iconic” or “signature” buildings aspiring to be on shortlists for architectural awards. Higher education is investing unprecedented amounts in infrastructure – for good and necessary reasons but maybe for bad ones too, writes Professor Peter Scott (UCL Institute of Education) in the Guardian.

Ageing, health, and social care: reframing the discussion

Publication date:

quad

The current age structure of the UK population is radically different from that at inception of the National Health Service (NHS) in 1948, and health inequalities are widening fastest in people aged 65 years and older, writes Dr Daniel Davis (UCL MRC Unit for Lifelong Health & Ageing) in The Lancet (£).

Science will suffer after general election – no matter who wins

Publication date:

Jennifer Rohn

What is science for? Most will think of headline-grabbing applications: life-saving medicines, the latest gadgets and clean-energy alternatives that may one day save our planet. Others might cite vast particle colliders that reveal fundamental insights into the workings of the universe. Few, perhaps, will consider the more prosaic economic implications of a healthy science base, writes Dr Jennifer Rohn (UCL Clinical Physiology) in New Scientist.

Would John Williams’ Stoner survive today?

Publication date:

quad

Recently, almost 50 years after its original publication – but only two years after it became a best-seller – I got around to reading John Williams’ Stoner. For those of you who are not familiar with the book, which was hailed by The New Yorker as “the greatest American novel you’ve never heard of”, it is a beautifully written story about one man’s perfectly ordinary life, writes Dr Rachel Carey (UCL Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology) in THE (£).

Open letter to the science minister

Publication date:

Graeme Reid

Congratulations on your appointment. Your predecessors have worked with the community to build science and research into one of this country’s greatest strengths. However, several major challenges still remain. The UK’s scientific community is built on the free flow of talent. Immigration policy has threatened this flow and tarnished our reputation. The solution is clear: we need to remove the immigration limit on highly skilled people, writes Professor Graeme Reid (Office of the UCL Vice-Provost, Research) in Research Fortnight (£).

How earthquake safety measures could have saved thousands of lives in Nepal

Publication date:

Ian Kelman

Earthquake engineers often say earthquakes don’t kill people, collapsing buildings do. The tragic loss of life that followed the huge earthquake in Nepal on April 25 occurred despite the fact that the country is among the world’s leaders in community-based efforts to reduce disaster risk. But poverty, corruption, and poor governance have all led to a failure to enforce building codes – as has a shortage of skilled engineers, planners and architects, writes Dr Ilan Kelman (UCL Institute for Risk & Disaster Reduction) in The Conversation.

There are real risks for the SNP in supporting a minority Labour government

Publication date:

Michael Collins

For now, the Tories would love English voters to believe this. Ed Miliband in the pocket of Alex Salmond and Nicola Sturgeon is a theme designed purely for their core English vote. David Cameron seems willing to exchange an SNP landslide in Scotland for a Tory victory at Westminster. Coming from the so-called Conservative and Unionist Party, this is an astonishingly cavalier and short-sighted betrayal of the party's history, which they may live to regret, writes Dr Michael Collins (UCL History) in The Herald.

Dog day care shows why the output gap is now largely redundant

Publication date:

Ormerod

I am keen on dogs. Recently, I saw an advert for a special canine toothbrush designed to get rid of the pet’s bad breath – surely a difficult challenge given what dogs get up to. Vans promoting home beauty visits for dogs have been widespread for some time now. A new service being promoted is day care for dogs, similar, one might think, to child care. The dog is deposited and entertained for the day while you go off to your meeting or out to lunch, writes Dr Paul Ormerod (UCL Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology) in City AM.

What kind of society do we want: getting the balance right

Publication date:

Michael Marmot

Laissez-faire is part of “the air we still breathe”, wrote John Maynard Keynes in 1926. “We do not dance even yet to a new tune.” Conservative individualism of 18th-century luminaries such as David Hume, conveniently underpinned by the supposed free market economics of Adam Smith, led to the view that enlightened self-interest operates in the public interest. Hence, leave things to the market, writes Professor Michael Marmot (UCL Epidemiology & Public Health) in The Lancet.

Nepal earthquake: A shocking disaster in one of the most remarkable countries on earth

Publication date:

Anthony Costello

The Nepal earthquake was expected. For 15 years seismologists warned of growing tension along the Nepal-Bihar fault line, which snaps at least once a century. They feared a repeat of the 1934 disaster that killed 12,000 people, one sixth of the population, including the daughters of the King and Prime Minister. Now 2.5m people are crammed into the Valley. Would the honeycomb of fragile, hastily built homes collapse? Would only the solid, historic buildings survive, asks Professor Anthony Costello (UCL Institute for Global Health) in the Independent.

Yellowstone earthquakes reveal a volcanic system four times bigger than we thought

Publication date:

quad

Seismologists have discovered a massive magma reservoir beneath the Yellowstone supervolcano in Wyoming, US, that suggests its volcanic system could be more than four times larger than was previously thought, writes Robin Wylie (UCL Earth Sciences) in The Conversation.

Hubble captured the throes of a dying star, V838 Moncerotis

Publication date:

Raman Prinja

During its impressive 25 years the Hubble Space Telescope has captured numerous remarkable views of the universe, providing astronomers with a wealth of data for making astounding discoveries. Of all the beautiful astronomical objects observed by Hubble one of the most awe-inspiring is the massive, dying star V838 Moncerotis, writes Professor Raman Prinja (Physics & Astronomy) in The Conversation.

Here’s where Britain’s political parties stand (and fall down) on immigration

Publication date:

quad

Immigration clearly ranks as one of the most important issues for voters in the lead up to the UK’s election. But public opinion doesn’t always match up with the evidence, and political parties can be led in different directions by both. With this in mind, the following takes stock of the different policies about immigration, as outlined in the parties' manifestos, writes Professor Ian Preston (UCL Economics) in The Conversation.

Vorsprung durch realpolitik – what VW power games say about German CEO culture

Publication date:

Bernard Rieger

"I am distancing myself from Winterkorn." With this short sentence, the powerful chairman of Volkswagen’s supervisory board, Ferdinand Piëch, expressed his misgivings about CEO Martin Winterkorn, who has led Europe’s largest car manufacturer to unprecedented heights since 2007, writes Professor Bernhard Rieger (UCL History) in The Conversation.

Why zero inflation means there are no more free lunches for politicians

Publication date:

Ormerod

The temptation to believe in the concept of a free lunch has proved irresistible to numerous governments through the ages. Henry VIII, for example, has seized the popular imagination once again through Damian Lewis’s brilliant portrayal of him in Wolf Hall. Bluff King Hal is the nickname often associated with the King, writes Dr Paul Ormerod (UCL Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology) in City AM.

Fostering before the age of two helps children in institutional care deal better with stress

Publication date:

quad

As human beings we are born helpless and entirely dependent on those who care for us. Most of us are lucky to have had parents or guardians who provided us with food, security and comfort. We form attachment experiences with these caregivers that create a way to develop our social skills and grow up with a sense of purpose and value in the social world, says Professor Essi Viding and Professor Eamon McCrory (both UCL Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology) in The Conversation.

Finland election: anti-EU right marches onto centre stage

Publication date:

quad

A right wing anti-EU party has enjoyed success in Finland’s election that saw the governing National Coalition suffer a dramatic defeat. After a campaign dominated by domestic issues, the opposition Centre party won 49 seats of the 200 up for election, while the anti-EU Finns Party won 38 and the governing National Coalition won 37, writes Nicholas Prindiville (UCL SSEES) in The Conversation.

India's obsessive spending on defence

Publication date:

Phiroze Vasunia

Arms manufacturers of the world, rejoice. The government of India is your loyal friend. Not just this government, but the previous government too - the UPA as well as the NDA. According to a study conducted by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, India topped the list of weapons importers and accounted for some 15 per cent of worldwide arms imports from 2010 to 2014, writes Professor Phiroze Vasunia (UCL Greek & Latin) in NDTV.

Doctor, doctor … we’re suffering a glut of PhDs who can’t find academic jobs

Publication date:

Jo Wolff

If you are taking a PhD, especially in the sciences, look away now. It may be stale news but I’ve just seen a graph from a 2010 Royal Society report suggesting that of every 200 people completing a PhD, only seven will get a permanent academic post. Only one will become a professor, writes Professor Jonathan Wolff (UCL Philosophy) in the Guardian.

Manifesto Check: Lib Dems lack vision on early years and primary education

Publication date:

quad

There is at least one societal aim that has universal agreement: the idea that education should be of the highest quality, and that children and young people should learn and develop well. This is addressed in the Liberal Democrats’ manifesto pledges to improve early years education and teaching. What few details the Lib Dems give of their plans for early years and primary education are broadly to be welcomed, writes Professor Dominic Wyse (UCL Institute of Education) in The Conversation.

Attractive fundraisers and alpha male donors spur bidding wars on online charity sites

Publication date:

quad

In marathons this week in Boston and London, elite runners will engage in a fierce competition to win the men’s and women’s titles as they zip across each city. But another, more primitive competition of sorts will already have taken place on charity runners’ fundraising pages: a battle among men to prove they have the most generous hearts in order to win the amorous attention of a beautiful woman asking for money, writes Dr Nichola Raihani (UCL Genetics, Evolution & Environment) in The Conversation.

Manifesto Check: Lib Dems take a more liberal approach to immigration

Publication date:

quad

When asked about immigration in the recent leaders' debate, Nick Clegg sought to draw a distinction between “good” and “bad” immigration. The Liberal Democrat manifesto does not try to push this distinction. Immigration is presented as primarily a good thing, writes Professor Ian Preston (UCL Economics) in The Conversation.

Generation K: what it means to be a teen

Publication date:

Noreena Hertz

I could hear the anxiety in her voice as she recalled “the incident”. Her words became staccato, her breathing more perceptible. “It was the worst thing ever. Awful. Horrible. Terrible.” What trauma was this poor young woman recounting? Had she witnessed a mugging? Experienced the loss of someone close? Been shunned by her peers? Not quite. This is how Jen, 19, recalled feeling after dropping her smartphone in the toilet. For Jen, I connect, therefore I am, writes Professor Noreena Hertz (Office of the UCL Vice-Provost, Research) in the Financial Times.

Search UCL News