Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop
75th Anniversary, Institute of Archaeology 2012
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Workshop leaders

  • Introduction to Maya Writing - Ramzy Barrois and Panos Kratimenos
  • Utok' upakal: Ancient Maya Militarism at Yaxchilan, Chiapas, Mexico - Harri Kettunen and Eva Jobbova

Organisers

  • Elizabeth Graham is Professor of Mesoamerican Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL. She carries out field research in Belize, most recently at the Maya sites of Lamanai and Marco Gonzalez, where she co-directs excavations with Scott Simmons of the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. Her book Maya Christians and Their Churches in Sixteenth-Century Belize was published in 2011 by the University Press of Florida.
  • Eva Jobbová is a Research Student at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL. She has worked with the Belize Valley Reconaissance Project in western Belize and currently participates on research carried out by Slovak Archaeological and Historical Institute at the Maya site of Uaxactún, in Petén, Guatemala. Her research interests include settlement pattern archaeology, use of GIS and spatial analysis in archaeology and Maya epigraphy.
  • Claudia Zehrt is a Research Student at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL. She has worked with the INAH and the University of Bonn in Yucatán, Mexico, and most recently in western Belize. Her work with a Trent University project there is the topic of her PhD thesis on Fate and Fortune: Dynamics of social organisation at Minanha, Belize, focusing on the excavation of a small residential group and its life history, the indicators for social status and relations of its inhabitants, and the final abandonment during the Terminal Classic.
  • Panos Kratimenos is a Research Student at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL. He currently works with Elizabeth Graham at the Maya site of Marco Gonzalez, Belize. His research is focused on the emergence of ventrally-placed legs-flexed burials at the site around the time of the Terminal Classic-Postclassic Transition (the 'Collapse') and using these as a proxy for better understanding the wholescale cultural and political change which occurred across the Maya world at this time.  
  • Lindsay Duncan is a Research Student at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL. She currently works with Elizabeth Graham at the Maya site of Marco Gonzalez on Ambergris Caye, Belize. Her research focuses on long-term environmental impact from human activities, particularly impact on soils and vegetation. 

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