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The Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences encompasses the logical, experimental and mathematical study of our Universe. The Faculty is an internationally renowned centre for both theoretical and applied research and a centre of educational excellence.

Front-line research feeds directly into our teaching programmes, and our students benefit from access to first-class laboratory facilities.

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Natural Sciences

The faculty's flagship degree programme combines science subjects to reflect the high-quality, internationally-leading research undertaken at UCL. Students can investigate a wide range of subjects under guidance from experts in their field.

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Find out about the broad range of single-subject science degrees at undergraduate level covering: Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Mathematics, Physics & Astronomy, Science & Technology Studies, Space and Climate Physics, Statistical Science.

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The faculty offers a broad range of single-subject science degrees at postgraduate level covering: Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Mathematics, Physics & Astronomy, Science & Technology Studies, Space and Climate Physics, Statistical Science.

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News from UCL Mathematical & Physical Sciences

Professor John Morton awarded the 2016 Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize

Professor John Morton, LCN Professor in Nanoelectronics and Nanophotonics, has been awarded the prestigious 2016 Raymond and Beverley Sacker International Prize in Physical Science for his ‘outstanding and imaginative applications of magnetic resonance to quantum information storage and processing’.

Published: Dec 8, 2016 10:08:46 AM

First signs of weird quantum property of empty space?

By studying the light emitted from an extraordinarily dense and strongly magnetised neutron star using ESO’s Very Large Telescope, astronomers may have found the first observational indications of a strange quantum effect, first predicted in the 1930s. The polarisation of the observed light suggests that the empty space around the neutron star is subject to a quantum effect known as vacuum birefringence.

Published: Nov 30, 2016 11:42:52 AM

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