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News from UCL Mathematical & Physical Sciences

UCL scientists honoured in annual RAS awards

Two UCL scientists and one scientific collaboration led by a UCL researcher have been recognised in this year's Royal Astronomical Society Awards.

Published: Jan 12, 2015 11:13:13 AM

Shedding light on why blue LEDs are so tricky to make

Scientists at UCL, in collaboration with groups at the University of Bath and the Science & Technology Facilities Council's Daresbury Laboratory, have uncovered the mystery of why blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are so difficult to make, by revealing the complex properties of their main component – gallium nitride – using sophisticated computer simulations.

Published: Jan 7, 2015 5:07:07 PM

News stories from departmental websites

UCL founding member of Alan Turing Institute for Data Science

UCL will be one of five academic partners for the new Alan Turing Institute for Data Science. Based at the new King’s Cross Knowledge Quarter, the national Institute will draw together computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians and more to work on this key driver for the economy.

Published: Jan 29, 2015 11:45:05 AM

Dr Ricardo Silva to join other UCL researchers in Science Museum "Lates" Event

Dr Ricardo Silva will present some of his current work with Transport for London in the "Disaster Zone" section of the January 2015 edition of the Science Museum "Lates" event, a free night for adults that takes place on the last Wednesday of the month. The Disaster Zone section will be open from 18:45-21:30.

Published: Jan 27, 2015 4:08:28 PM

2015 Careers Fair - 29th January 

The annual Careers Forum takes place in the Garwood Lecture Theatre, from 6 – 7.30 and is followed by wine etc. in the Rock Room, where you are able to meet the speakers, and also Andy Walsh, the Careers Consultant within the UCL Careers Service who is responsible for Earth Sciences.

Published: Jan 27, 2015 2:52:43 PM

World's Biggest Landslide Floated Like a Hovercraft

The Heart Mountain landslide of northwest Wyoming is the largest known sub-aerial landslide on Earth. During its emplacement more than 2000 km3 of Paleozoic sedimentary and Eocene volcanic rocks slid >45 km on a basal detachment surface dipping 2°, leading to 100 yr of debate regarding the emplacement mechanisms. "Even I have a hard time visualizing a mountain moving 50 kilometers, but you can move it if the friction is low enough," said lead study author Tom Mitchell.

Published: Jan 21, 2015 4:32:48 PM