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Picture of the Week

LUX dark matter detector

Detecting dark matter

The kind of matter and energy we can see and touch – whether it is in the form of atoms and molecules, or heat and light, only forms a tiny proportion of the content of the Universe, only about 5%. Over a quarter is dark matter, which is totally invisible but whose gravitational attraction can be detected; while over two thirds is dark energy, a force that pushes the Universe to expand ever faster.
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Archive of News

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29 November 2013: Comet ISON: full of surprises

Lots of surprises from Comet ISON today! More...

28 November 2013: GREAT3 challenges researchers to find new methods for measuring weak gravitational lensing

Think you can figure out a way to unlock one of the biggest secrets of the universe? The recently launched third Gravitational Lensing Accuracy Testing challenge (GREAT3) is giving researchers the opportunity to do just that. More...

22 November 2013: MAPS wins funding for two Centres for Doctoral Training

The Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences is delighted to announce that it has won funding for two EPSRC Centres for Doctoral Training (out of seven awarded to UCL). More...

18 November 2013: UCL top in research council income

UCL researchers and those who support their grant applications to research councils are to be congratulated, writes Professor David Price, UCL Vice-Provost (Research). More...

14 November 2013: Quantum state world record smashed

A normally fragile quantum state has been shown to survive at room temperature for a world record 39 minutes, overcoming a key barrier towards building ultrafast quantum computers. The research, published in the journal Science, was led by Mike Thewalt (Simon Fraser University, Canada), with involvement from researchers at UCL and Oxford University, and material provided from collaborating institutes in Berlin. More...

5 November 2013: Designer Piercings: New membrane pores with DNA nanotechnology

A new way to build membrane-crossing pores, using Lego-like DNA building blocks, has been developed by scientists at UCL, in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Cambridge and the University of Southampton. More...

4 November 2013: Roots of earthquakes explained

Many populated areas around the world are prone to earthquakes, so understanding what controls their distribution and frequency is a top priority for the earth scientists. However the root causes often remain elusive because scientists have limited information about what happens deep down in the Earth’s crust. A new study by a team including Joanna Faure Walker (UCL IRDR), published in Nature Geoscience, has shed new light on this problem, and has shown how phenomena on the surface can be linked to the movement of rocks deep down in the Earth’s crust. More...

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