milk

Maps

V-13907G


Dots represent collection locations. Colours and colour key show the frequencies of the LP phenotype estimated by surface interpolation. Taken from supplementary Figure 2 of Liebert et al 2017

V-13910T


Dots represent collection locations. Colours and colour key show the frequencies of the LP phenotype estimated by surface interpolation. Taken from supplementary Figure 2 of Liebert et al 2017

V-13915G


Dots represent collection locations. Colours and colour key show the frequencies of the LP phenotype estimated by surface interpolation. Taken from supplementary Figure 2 of Liebert et al 2017

V-14009G


Dots represent collection locations. Colours and colour key show the frequencies of the LP phenotype estimated by surface interpolation. Taken from supplementary Figure 2 of Liebert et al 2017

V-14010C


Dots represent collection locations. Colours and colour key show the frequencies of the LP phenotype estimated by surface interpolation. Taken from supplementary Figure 2 of Liebert et al 2017

Fig1


Dots represent collection locations. Colours and colour key show the frequencies of the LP phenotype estimated by surface interpolation. Taken from Itan et al 2010

-14,010 G>C, -13,915 T>G, -13,907 C>G, and -13,910 C>T
Fig.2


LP frequency prediction assumes Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and dominance. Crosses represent collection locations where all 4 currently known LP-associated alleles were genotyped, and diamonds represent collection locations where the only data on the -13,910 C>T allele is available. Colour key shows the predicted LP phenotype frequencies estimated by surface interpolation. Taken from Itan et al 2010

Fig.3


LP frequency prediction assumes Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and dominance. Stars represent collection locations. Colour key shows the predicted LP phenotype frequencies estimated by surface interpolation. Taken from Itan et al 2010

Fig 4

Predicted Old World LP phenotype frequencies based on frequency data for the currently known LP associated allelic variants, excluding the -13,910 C>T allele. LP frequency prediction assumes Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and dominance. Crosses represent collection locations. Colour key shows the predicted LP phenotype frequencies estimated by surface interpolation. Taken from Itan et al 2010

Fig.5


Old World LP genotype-phenotype correlation, obtained by calculating the quantitative difference between observed LP phenotype frequency and that predicted using frequency data on all 4 LP-associated alleles. Positive and negative values represent cases of LP-correlated genotype under- and over-predicting the LP phenotype, respectively. Dots represent LP phenotype collection locations, crosses represent data collection locations for all currently known 4 LP-correlated alleles, and diamonds represent -13,910 C>T only data collection locations. Colour key shows the values of the predicted LP phenotype frequencies (Figure 2) subtracted from the observed LP phenotype frequencies (Figure 1). Taken from Itan et al 2010

Fig6


Old World LP genotype-phenotype correlation, obtained by the GenoPheno Monte Carlo test. Dots represent LP phenotype data collection locations, crosses represent data collection locations for all currently known 4 LP-correlated alleles, and diamonds represent collection locations for data on -13,910 C>T only. Colour key shows the p value obtained by the GenoPheno test. Red colour represents values of p<0.01, indicating a highly significant lack of correlation, yellow colour represents values of 0.01≤p<0.05, indicating a significant lack of correlation, and blue colour represents values of p≥0.05, indicating no significant lack of correlation. Taken from Itan et al 2010