Colin Campbell Lloyd (née Baillie)

1781 - 1830

Claimant or beneficiary

Biography

Trustees of the marriage settlement of Miss Colin Campbell Baillie (Sir George Young and Sir John Tylden Maxwell) claimed for the compensation for the enslaved people on Baillie's Bacolet in Grenada.

  1. She was the daughter of Miss Colin Campbell and James Baillie who married in Grenada 26/04/1772. Her mother Miss Colin Campbell was the daughter of Colin Roy Campbell of Glenure, factor of the forfeited Stewart estates in Argyll and victim of the famous Appin murder in 1752. James Baillie (1737-1793) was the brother of Evan Baillie (1742-1835) and therefore Colin Campbell Baillie was the first cousin of James Evan Baillie and Hugh Duncan Baillie (both q.v.).

  2. There is a portrait by Gainsburgh of her parents James Baillie and Colin nee Campbell c. 1784 with their four eldest children: Colin is the fourth, shown as the baby on her mother's knee.

  3. Collin [sic] Campbell Baillie married Edward Lloyd in London at St Marylebone 08/08/1816.

  4. Mrs Colin Campbell Lloyd was apparently the victim of the quack doctor John St John Long of Harley Street: "On Wednesday morning, the 10th of November, 1830, at eleven o'clock, J. H. Gell, Esq., and a highly respectable jury assembled at the Wilton Arms, Kinnerton Street, Knightsbridge, to inquire into the death of Mrs Colin Campbell Lloyd, aged forty-eight, the wife of Captain Edward Lloyd, of the Royal Navy, whose death was alleged to have been occasioned by the treatment she had experienced under the hands of Mr St John Long. The jury retired for about half-an-hour, and then returned the following verdict: "The jury, having attentively and deliberately considered their verdict, can come to no other than manslaughter against John St John Long." The coroner inquired on what grounds they found their verdict. The foreman said: "On the ground of gross ignorance, and on other considerations." Upon this second charge Mr Long was tried at the Old Bailey on the 19th of February, 1831. The jury, however, returned a verdict of not guilty. Several ladies, elegantly dressed, remained with the prisoner in the dock throughout the day, to whom this verdict appeared to give great satisfaction. Mr Long died in the year 1834, and his body was consigned to a tomb in the Harrow Road Cemetery, where a monument was erected to his memory at the cost of his former patients, who, in an inscription, paid a handsome tribute to his talents."

  5. Burial of Colin Campbell Lloyd of St Georges Hanover Square 13/11/1830.

  6. In 1851, Edward Lloyd, aged 64, Captain RN, born Germany, was living at Cheltenham with his daughter Colin Campbell aged 33 and her husband Conway Whitehorne Lovesey (sometimes given as Lovesy).

Sources

T71/880 Grenada no. 864.

  1. Douglas Hamilton, Scotland, the Caribbean and the Atlantic world, 1750-1820 (Manchester, Manchester University Press, 2005) pp. 89-90. History of Parliament Online for details of James Baillie: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1790-1820/member/baillie-james-1737-93 [accessed 10/04/2013].

  2. http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/gainsborough-the-baillie-family-n00789 [accessed 10/04/2013].

  3. Ancestry.com, London, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921 [database online].

  4. Plain text version of the Newgate Calendar available at http://www.exclassics.com/newgate/newgate3.txt [accessed 10/04/2013]. Notice of death including report of the manslaughter verdict in the Annual Register (1830), Vol. 72 p. 277.

  5. Ancestry.com, London, England, Deaths and Burials, 1813-1980 [database online]; National Probate Calendar 1889.

  6. 1851 census online.

We are grateful to Jim Brennan for his assistance in compiling this entry.


Further Information

Absentee?
British/Irish
Maiden Name
Baillie
Spouse
Edward Lloyd
Children
Colin Campbell (1818-)

Associated Claims (1)

£8,985 17S 2D
Beneficiary deceased

Relationships (6)

Sister → Brother
Sister → Brother
Niece → Uncle
Sisters
First Cousins
First Cousins

Addresses (1)

London, Middlesex, London, England