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UCL Laws Events: Tony Thomas Seminars in Roman Law

About the Tony Thomas Seminars in Roman Law

JAC (Tony) Thomas was Professor of Roman Law at UCL from 1965 to 1981. His famously inspiring lectures and influential research established a tradition of Roman law scholarship in the Faculty of Laws, which the Tony Thomas Seminars in Roman Law both continue and celebrate.

Current Events

New Events for the 2014-15 session will be made available here soon.

Past Events

FRANDThe Birth of a Profession: The Jurists of the Roman Republic"

14 March 2014, from 5 - 7pm

  • Speaker: Dr Christine Lehne, University of Innsbruck
  • Chair: Prof. Paul Mitchell (UCL)
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredit for CPD
Dr Lehne's wide-ranging, original and thought-provoking paper challenged as a myth the association between priests and the early jurists, and argued that the inspiration for jurists' activities was the civic duties of the patronus. She also discussed the criticisms of jurists in literary sources including Cicero and Horace.

 

Bernard StolteJustinianus Redivivus. Some Recent Discoveries in Palimpsest Manuscripts

31 January 2014

  • Speaker: Professor Bernard Stolte (University of Groningen)
  • Chair: Prof. Paul Mitchell (UCL)
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredit for CPD
Professor Bernard Stolte (University of Groningen) gave the first of the Tony Thomas Seminars in Roman Law on the subject: “Justinianus Redivivus. Some Recent Discoveries in Palimpsest Manuscripts”. He explained that, by taking advantage of recent advances in digital photographic methods, it had become possible to read the text of otherwise illegible palimpsests. Some of the palimpsests to which this new technique had been applied were found to contain new versions of sections of the Basilica (a 10th century Greek paraphrase of Justinian’s works). As Professor Stolte put it, these discoveries created the tantalising possibility of getting closer to Justinian’s actual words