UCL FACULTY OF LAWS

LLM Programme

Laws Events

The UCL Laws events programme reflects the diversity of teaching and research offered by the Faculty, with a regular selection of lively seminars, lectures, debates and conferences on a wide variety of engaging legal topics. Many of the events are accredited by the Solicitors Regulation Authority, the Bar Standards Board, and IP Reg for CPD credit. The majority of our events are free and open to everyone - unless otherwise stated.

July 2014

Professor Hugh HansenUCL Centre for Criminal Law in collaboration with Thomas Bingham Chambers
Challenging Prosecution Decisions

Thursday 31 July 2014, 6 - 7.30pm

  • Speakers: Professor Ian Dennis (UCL) and Dr Jonathan Rogers (UCL)
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: Accreditation for CPD is pending for this event
The speakers will discuss developments in the law governing challenges to prosecution decisions. Professor Dennis, Director of the Centre, will deal with decisions to prosecute and challenges to them by way of judicial review and applications to stay for abuse of process. Dr Rogers, Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Laws UCL, will deal with challenges to decisions not to prosecute, with consideration of possible human rights arguments.

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September 2014

FRANDUCL Centre for Law and the Environment
Reflections on Nuisance and Regulation

Monday 15 September 2014, 3.30 - 6.30pm

  • Speakers: Maria Lee (UCL) on Nuisance and the complexity of regulation ; Eloise Scotford (Dickson Poon School of Law) on Private nuisance, regulation and the nature of property rights: an evolving legal story; Ben Pontin (University of the West of England) on The co-evolution of nuisance and environmental regulation; Jenny Steele (University of York) on “An unduly moralistic approach to disputes”? Monetary remedies for nuisance after Coventry v Lawrence; and Justine Thornton (39 Essex Street) on The role of public nuisance in environmental pollution control
  • Chair: The Rt Hon The Lord Carnwath of Notting Hill, CVO, and Paul Mitchell (UCL)
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is accredited with 3 CPD hours (SRA & BSB)
The place of regulatory decisions in private nuisance is of enormous practical significance, for litigators, planners, businesses and communities. It also highlights broader, persistent questions about the relative roles of courts and administrative bodies in the generation and enforcement of appropriate social (including environmental) standards, and in the distribution of risks, opportunities, costs and benefits. Recent judicial exploration of the relationship between private nuisance and planning controls has provided an instructive context for these questions, and the Supreme Court decision in Coventry v Lawrence [2014] UKSC 13 is a central moment in the evolution of the relationship between the regulatory state and the common law courts.

There remains, however, much to discuss.

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FRAND UCL Centre for Law and the Environment
Renuion for UCL Environmental Law Graduates

Thursday 25 September 2014, 6-8pm

  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: For UCL Environmental Law Alumni only. Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
Professor Richard Macrory is increasingly aware of how our former LLM environmental law students are cropping up everywhere - NGOs, government, agencies, the private sector, you name it! We know that many of you keep in touch with your own year group, but we thought it would be a good thing to hold our first ever reunion of UCL environmental law alumni with an informal reception at Bentham House and a few short talks. Those who want to go out to supper afterwards with friends can make appropriate arrangements.

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October 2014

Professor Cass SunsteinUCL Quain Lectures 2014-15
Free by Default

over three evenings: Monday 13th, Tuesday 14th, & Wednesday 15th October 2014, 6-7pm

  • Speaker: Professor Cass R. Sunstein, Harvard Law School
  • Chair: Professor John Tasioulas, UCL
  • Venue: UCL Central Campus
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
When should people choose, and when should they choose not to do so? Contrary to some of the important strands in liberal political thought, human beings are often free by default. Default rules, chosen by private or public institutions, establish settings and starting points for central aspects of our lives, including countless goods and activities—cell phones, rental car agreements, computers, savings plans, health insurance, websites, privacy, and much more. Many of these rules do a great deal of good, but others are badly chosen and impose considerable harm. The obvious alternative to default rules, of particular interest when individual situations are diverse, is active choosing, by which people are asked or required to make decisions on their own. But if active choosing were required in all contexts, people would quickly be overwhelmed. Especially in complex and unfamiliar areas, default rules have significant advantages. It is where people prefer to choose, and where learning is both feasible and important, that active choosing is usually best. At the same time, it is increasingly possible for private and public institutions to produce highly personalized default rules, designed to fit individual circumstances, and thus to reduce the problems with one-size-fits-all defaults. At least when choice architects can be trusted, personalized default rules offer most (not all) of the advantages of active choosing without the disadvantages; they can increase both welfare and freedom. These points raise fresh challenges for capitalist economies, the proper conception of human dignity, democratic processes, and personal privacy.

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Professor Cass SunsteinUCL Legal & Social Philosophy Colloquium
Discussion Session on Free by Default

Thursday 16 October from 2-4pm

  • Speaker: Professor Cass R. Sunstein, Harvard Law School
  • Chair: Professor John Tasioulas, UCL
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
This session gives the audiences at the Quain Lectures the opportunity to discuss with Professor Cass Sunstain the content of his three Quain Lectures on Free by Default.

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Dr Sylvia TerbeckUCL Centre for Law & Ethics
Moral Judgements: Insights from Psychology, Computer Science and Neuroscience

Wednesday 22 October from 5-6.30pm

  • Speaker: Dr Sylvia Terbeck, School of Psychology, University of Plymouth
  • Discussant: Dr Sylvie Delacroix, UCL
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
Originally, moral judgments were mostly discussed in philosophy where researchers would investigate the notions on which laws should ultimately be based. However, more recently an increasing amount of empirical research has been conducted with mainly two aims: a) to provide insights into the psychological mechanisms of how humans form moral judgments, and b) to provide advice and discuss the normative implications for moral theory and, ultimately, law. It is on this topic that Dr Sylvia Terbeck will review her own work in moral psychology and neuroscience. For instance, her team found that noradrenaline – a neurotransmitter involved in fight-or-flight responses - increased deontological moral judgments in traditional moral dilemmas (e.g., killing one to save many). They suggested that an increase in harm-aversion, and reduced aggression, might have produced this effect. She will also present the results of a study using Immersive Virtual Reality, which demonstrated how the race of the avatar had an effect on virtual and real-life moral behaviour, and will address how the interdisciplinary discourse might need improvement, illustrating this with a description of a very interesting and novel experiment on moral enhancement using placebo-effects.

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JudgesUCL Current Legal Problems Lectures
More than just a different face? Judicial Diversity and Decision-Making

Thursday 23 October 2014, 6-7pm

  • Speakers: Professor Rosemary Hunter (University of Kent)
  • Chair: Rt. Hon. Sadiq Khan MP
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1 CPD hour with the SRA (BSB pending)
This lecture addresses a key question in debates around judicial diversity: what evidence is there that a more diverse judiciary will make a difference to substantive decision-making? The lecture will begin by outlining the range of arguments for a more diverse judiciary, which include but are not confined to making a difference to substantive decision-making. It will then turn to consider the considerable evidence which now exists both to refute and to support the existence of substantive differences in decision-making following the appointment of women and others from non-traditional backgrounds to the judiciary. On the basis of this evidence, it will draw conclusions as to the kinds of differences in decision-making which might be expected, and the circumstances under which different approaches to decision-making are likely to flourish.

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November 2014

JudgesUCL IBIL
Drafting Clearer Contracts CPD Course

Monday 3 November 2014, 9.30am - 5.45pm

  • Tutor: Ken Adams
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Fees apply. Early bird rates available until 29 August 2014
  • Accreditation: This event is accredited with 6 CPD hour with the SRA (BSB pending)
In the transactional world, contract drafting is an essential skill. But traditional contract drafting consists of copying, on faith, precedent contracts of uncertain quality and relevance. It follows that traditional contract language is full of archaisms, redundancies, chaotic verb structures, and misconceptions as to the utility of commonplace usages. And because contract drafting has consisted of copying, drafters have traditionally done without formal training or rigorous guidelines. An antidote to that dysfunction is Ken Adams’s “Drafting Clearer Contracts” seminar. This will be Adams’s first public “Drafting Clearer Contracts” seminar in the UK. This one-day course is a uniquely rigorous overview of the building blocks of contract language and common sources of confusion. The focus is not on what you say in a contract, but how to say clearly and concisely whatever it is you want to say. It is suitable for all levels of seniority, as much of what Adams has to say comes as news to even senior contracts professionals—don’t expect him to recycle the conventional wisdom! It’s structured to encourage discussion, with participants analyzing examples and doing short drafting exercises.

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JudgesUCL Current Legal Problems Lectures
Pay (in)equity and agent (dis)incentives

Thursday 27 November 2014, 6-7pm

  • Speakers: Marc T Moore (University of Cambridge)
  • Chair: Professor Charlotte Villiers, Bristol
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1 CPD hour with the SRA (BSB pending)
It is trite that recent decades have seen an explosion in levels of senior executive remuneration in public companies, both absolutely and relative to ordinary worker pay. A conspicuous corresponding trend over recent years, though, has been the development of a range of countervailing regulatory tools designed to mitigate this disparity within various national environments. These include regulatory pay ratio caps, bonus bans, and mandatory pay ratio disclosures. Notwithstanding these salient developments, prevailing legal and economic debates on executive and worker pay remain rooted in the dominant principal-agent paradigm of corporate governance, which consistently disputes the relevance of equitable or distributive fairness concerns to the essentially functional challenge of determining effective agent incentives. In this lecture I will take issue with the orthodox principal-agent perspective on pay equity, by demonstrating the centrality of equitable concerns to effective agent-incentive design, both at senior executive and ordinary worker levels.

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December 2014

JudgesUCL Current Legal Problems Lectures
Rethinking 'economic' derogations and justifications under the EU's free movement rules: Proposals for a new approach and a taxonomy

Thursday 4 December 2014, 6-7pm

  • Speakers: Professor Sue Arrowsmith (University of Nottingham)
  • Chair: Professor Paul Craig (University of Oxford)
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1 CPD hour with the SRA (BSB pending)
The European Court of Justice has stated in many cases a general principle that “economic” aims do not fall within the explicit derogations from the Treaty’s free movement rules, and also cannot constitute mandatory requirements or imperative reasons in the public interest that can justify measures that hinder trade. This paper will propose a taxonomy of the different kinds of measures that are economic in a broad sense, and propose for each different approaches to their treatment under the free movement rules.

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JudgesUCL Current Legal Problems Lectures
Mapping a new regulatory space: The case of managing water scarcity in the UK

Thursday 11 December 2014, 6-7pm

  • Speakers: Associate Professor Bettina Lange (University of Oxford)
  • Chair: Professor Maria Lee (UCL)
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1 CPD hour with the SRA (BSB pending)
This paper discusses key elements of an empirical socio-legal research project which analyses the legal regulation of water resources in the UK. The research project develops a critical analysis of legal regulatory strategies for preventing and managing water scarcity in the UK, and drought specifically. The key objective is to understand how specific economic and environmental science knowledge practices, such as cost-benefit analysis and strategic environmental assessment, inform the choice of particular drought management options, such as drought orders and temporary water use bans.

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APPLICATION NOTICES

The application process for the 2014-15 academic session, for entry in September 2014, is now closed.

Information regarding applications for September 2015 will be updated on the website in September 2014.

IMPORTANT NOTICE : Updated 28 May 2014

The Home Office issued an update about the acceptance of ETS tests (including TOEFL). They have now confirmed that Higher Education students applying for a Tier 4 visa may use a TOEFL test taken after 17 April, if a Higher Education Institution is willing to use its academic discretion. For those students entering in September 2014, UCL will continue to accept the TOEFL even if it was taken after 17 April. However, if an applicant still needs to book a test then we recommend that they take an alternative test to TOEFL. Those who have already arranged to take a different test following the previous advice from the Home Office, we encourage you to go ahead with taking the alternative test.

The TOEFL test will continue to be accepted for 2014 entrants who have been asked to take an English language qualification as part of their offer condition, and do not need to apply for a visa to study in the UK.