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Laws Events - Past Events 2013-14

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Friday 13 December 2013
Bentham Project
New Directions in Bentham Studies Symposium
  • Speaker: Anne Brunon-Ernst (Université Paris II), Emanuelle de Champs (Université Paris 8), Angela Marciniak (Universität Lüneburg), Paola Rudan (Università di Bologna), Guillaume Tusseau (Sciences Po).
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
This one-day symposium aims to facilitate discussion of new work in the inter-disciplinary field of Bentham Studies. Papers will explore both recent developments in, and potential future avenues for, research into the thought of English philosopher, jurist and spiritual founder of UCL, Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832).
Wednesday 11 December 2013
UCL Private Law CPD Series - The Year in Review
Land Law and Trusts
  • Speaker: Prof. Charles Mitchell (UCL) and Prof. Ben McFarlane
  • Accreditation: 2 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this event
This lecture provides an update on significant legal developments in Land Law and Trusts. The lecture will cover recent cases in land registration, Article 8 of the ECHR, proprietory estoppel, resulting trusts, constructive trusts, the 'Rule in Hastings Bass', breach of trust, landlord and tenant, and tracing.
Thursday 5 December 2013
UCL Current Legal Problems Lecture
Property's People
  • Speaker: Prof. Lorna Fox O'Mahony (University of Essex)
  • Accreditation:1 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this event
This lecture explored how the traditional methodologies of property law scholarship – centred on the status quo of established rights, obligations and duties, and invoking the ‘property values’ of certainty, autonomy, efficiency – marginalise the human ‘subjects’ of the property system.

Wednesday 4 December 2013
UCL Private Law CPD Series - The Year in Review
Unjust Enrichment
  • Speaker: Prof. Charles Mitchell (UCL) and Prof. Ben McFarlane
  • Accreditation: 2 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this event
This lecture provided an update on significant legal developments in Unjust Enrichment. The lecture covered recent cases in enrichment, unjust factors, defences, and at the claimant's expenses.

Wednesday 27 November 2013
UCL Britain & Europe Series
The Single Market and liberalisation, harmonisation and
mutual recognition: Time to rethink the balance of
competences between the EU and the
member states?
  • Speakers: Professor Kenneth Armstrong, University of Cambridge; Professor Kalypso Nicolaidis, University of Oxford; and Professor Stephen Weatherill, University of Oxford
  • Chair: Dr Ioannis Lianos, Reader in Economics and Competition Law, UCL
  • Accreditation: 1.5 CPD hour SRA & BSB
About this event
The establishment of a (single) internal market has been a major ambition and one of the most important achievements of the project of European integration. The interplay of the principles of market liberalisation, harmonization and mutual recognition, has been an essential feature of the European Internal Market law and policy. The recent financial and economic crisis may have tested some of the achievements of the European integration project although this has not yet led to a resurgence of the protectionist policies of the past. The economic and social crisis that followed raises questions over the costs and benefits for each jurisdiction of the Single Market, in particular because of the important trade imbalances between Member States of the EU, some of which enjoy a significant trade surplus, while others record trade deficits. The panel delved into these governance aspects of the Single Market project and their underlying politics. It also discussed the findings and proposals of the recent Single Market Report – Review of the Balance of Competences, released in July 2013 by the British Government, which examines the balance of competences between the European Union and the United Kingdom in the area of the Single Market and explores the impact of the Single Market on the UK national interest.
Wednesday 27 November 2013
UCL Centre for Commercial Law
Private Equity and Hedge Funds after the Global Financial Crisis
  • Speakers: Professor Timothy Spangler (Kaye Scholer LLP / UCL Laws Visiting Professor)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this lecture
As the recession stutters onwards systemic and structural causes for the financial crash continue to dominate international news and debate. Never has there been such an appetite and desire to understand the financial institutions that govern us. But despite public interest, alternative investment vehicles such as private equity and hedge funds remain elusive. Both have always had a unique position in the market, designed as they are to function outside of the rules that govern other financial organizations. But what is it that they do and - significantly - how is it that they have prospered since the 2008 meltdown despite the introduction of new regulatory regimes?
Monday 25 November 2013
International Law Association (British Branch) lecture
Investment Treaty Arbitration and the World Trade Organization: What Role for Systemic Values in the Resolution of International Economic Disputes
  • Speakers: Professor Dan Sarooshi, University of Oxford
  • Chair: Dr Martins Paparinskis, UCL
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA & BSB

About this lecture
This talk evaluated and compare a number of key elements of WTO and ICSID dispute settlement in order to gauge the extent to which broader values can, or indeed should, play a role in these two leading fora for the settlement of international economic disputes.
Friday 22 November 2013
UCL Laws Special Event
Mass Surveillance and Freedom of the Press: A Conversation with Glenn Greenwald
  • Speaker: Glenn Greenwald
  • Moderators: Dr Jeff King (UCL) and Myles Kaufman
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this event
Last June, Glenn Greenwald broke the story of the mass surveillance government programs disclosed in the leaks by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. In August Mr. Greenwald’s partner, David Miranda, was detained by police at Heathrow Airport for 9 hours under schedule 7 to the Terrorism Act 2000.  Mr. Greenwald has continued to release and comment on similar leaks since then and recently announced his departure from the Guardian to launch a new journalism venture with eBay co-founder Pierre Omidyar.

Our moderator led a conversation with Mr. Greenwald via Skype on the range of legal and political questions raised by his recent efforts. These include the lack of safeguards on government surveillance programs, the individual’s right to privacy, the freedom of the press to publish such information and any alleged threats these exposures pose to national security.

VIEW THE FILM OF THIS EVENT

Thursday 21 November 2013
UCL Current Legal Problems Lectures
Immigration Detention - The Ground Beneath Our Feet
  • Speaker: Dr Cathryn Costello, University of Oxford
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this event
Both our common law constitution and human rights law treat liberty as a central value. Yet, immigration detention remains less constrained, both normatively and institutionally, than other forms of detention. International human rights bodies and courts, and indeed domestic courts, routinely review and indeed sometimes condemn detention of migrants. Yet, that jurisprudence has been subject to a convincing critique, for failing to properly scrutinise the necessity of immigration detention. Many scholars have thus pointed out the law's anomalously indulgent approach to immigration detention, compared with other forms of deprivation of liberty. Yet, powerful as this critique is, it sometimes fails to address prior questions concerning the political purposes and legal grounds of detention. By examining these grounds and purposes, both legitimate and illegitimate, the lecture aimed to elucidate the manner in which immigration law produces reasons to detain, and thwarts any test of necessity from effectively constraining the state's power to detain migrants. The diverse approaches of the UN Human Rights Committee, European Court of Human Rights and Court of Justice of the European Union will be contrasted. The likely impact of new EU norms on detention of asylum-seekers and pre-removal detention was also explored.
Tuesday 19 November 2013
UCL Annual Mishcon Lecture 2013
Are we beyond the help of history?
  • Speaker: Professor Lisa Jardine, UCL Centre for Editing Lives and Letters
  • Introduction: UCL President & Provost, Professor Michael Arthur
  • Chair: Professor Geraldine van Bueren, Queen Mary University of London
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
'Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it', wrote Santayana at the dawn of the twentieth century. And indeed, throughout history, politicians and policy-makers have -- more or less self-consciously -- turned to the lessons of their nation's past to shape their judgement and inform their decision making. I shall be asking the question, 'Is this a strategy which can be followed today?' when the boundaries of nationhood are giving way to global histories and narratives in which forgetting is as important as remembering.
Thursday 14 November 2013
UCL Current Legal Problems Lecture
Governing 'As If': The Provisional Settlement of Knowledge Controversies in the WTO
  • Speakers: Dr Andrew Lang (LSE)
  • Chair: Prof. Frank Garcia (Boston)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by SRA & BSB
About this event
This lecture explores the relationship between practices of knowledge production and legal decision-making in the field of international economic law. It explores the 'practices of objectivity' by which certain forms of economic knowledge - whether tacit or explicit, formal or informal - are certified, and become the accepted basis for governance through law. It draws on the work of Jasanoff and Riles to identify a mode of 'governing as if': a pragmatic mode of governance through knowledge, which can be read against late twentieth century controversies over the socially constructed nature of scientific knowledge. The analysis is developed through a study of the benchmark problem in the field of subsidies regulation, as well as other areas of WTO law.
Thursday 14 & Friday 15 November 2013
UCL Laws with University of New South Wales
Socio-Legal and Theoretical Perspectives on International Economic Law
  • Speakers: Frank Garcia (Boston); Chi Carmody (Western Ontario); John Linarelli (Swansea); Lorand Bartels (Cambridge); Martins Paparinskis (UCL); Lisa Toohey (New South Wales); Amanda Perry-Kessaris (Kent); Matt Eagleton-Pierce (SOAS); Emily Reid (Southampton); Greg Messenger (Oxford); Gillian Moon (South Wales); Ljijana Biukovic (British Columbia); Moshe Hirsch (Jerusalem); and Alex Mills (UCL)
  • Accreditation: 7.5 CPD hours by the SRA & BSB.
About this event:
Scholarship in International Economic Law is becoming increasingly enriched by socio-legal and broad theoretical perspectives. The symposium will share ideas with colleagues who explore international economic law from this viewpoint.


View the abstracts from this event
Wednesday 13 November 2013
UCL Centre for Law, Economics and Society
New Challenges in EU Competition Law and Enforcement
  • Speakers: Andreas Coscelli (OFCom); Judge Nicholas Forwood (General Court of the EU); Damien Geradin (Tilburg, George Mason; Covington & Burling LLP); Alison Jones (Kings College London); John Kallaugher (Latham & Watkins); Nicholas Khan (European Commission, Legal Service); Ioannis Lianos (UCL); Lisa Lovdhal Gormsen (University of Manchester); Frank Maier-Rigaux (IESEG); Renato Nazzini (King's College London); Mark Powell (White & Case); John Temple Lang (Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton); and Andreas Stephan (University of East Anglia).
  • Accreditation: 4 CPD hours by the SRA and BSB
About this event
EU competition law is in constant evolution. The most remarkable recent developments have occurred in the context of the interpretation by the courts of Article 102 TFEU, as well as the recent proposal for a Damages directive and the way private enforcement of EU competition law will interact with public enforcement. Recent cases of the Court of Justice of the EU have challenged the options promoted by the proposed Damages Directive, while the important fines and far reaching remedies imposed or negotiated by the European Commission have yet again raised the issue of any existing boundaries to its discretion in this area. A panel of distinguished speakers from academia and practice will comment on the most recent developments in EU competition law and will provide their critical perspectives on the way ahead.
Friday 8 November 2013
UCL Institute for Sustainable Resources, UCL Faculty of Laws, and the UCL European Institute
The European Union Raw Materials Initiative: Responding to key legal and policy challenges
  • Topics covered: The Raw Materials Problem; The EU Raw Materials Initiative and Resource Efficiency Agenda: Alignment, Implementation and Future Strategies; and legal and policy issues: Opportunity for recommendations and further academic research
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
As part of UCL ISR’s wider engagement programme, this event was an important opportunity to bring together key experts from academia, EU institutions, private sector, government departments, and non-governmental organisations to discuss the main developments and challenges in this field.
Tuesday 5 & Wednesday 6 November 2013
UCL Institute of Brand & Innovation Law, with Taylor Wessing LLP
Standards, FRAND, NPEs and Injunctions
  • Speaker include: Judge Crabb (US), Judge Robart (US), Judge Klaus Grabinski (Germany), Lord Justice Floyd (UK), Mr Justice Birss (UK), Judge Rian Kalden (The Hague), Prof. Sir Robin Jackob (UCL), Brian Napper (FTI Consulting), Marta Beckwith (Cisco Systems), Heide Wollgast (WIPO), John Sideris (Koniklijke Philips Electrics), Dirk Weiler (ETSI), Carter Eltzroth (DVB), Dan Hermele (Qualcomm), Will Plut (Profit International LLC), Henri Linde (RPX), Sharaz Gill, Dieter Kamlah (Taylor Wessing), Gertjan Kuipers (De Brauw, Blackstone Westbroek), Gunner Wolfe (European Commission), Thomas Graf (Cleary Gottlieve Steen & Hamilton), MAtthew Heim (Qualcomm), Richard Vary (Nokia), Monica Magnusson (Ericsson), Michael Frohlich (RIM), Eric Fues (ITC), Luke McLeroy (Ericsson - US) and others
  • Accreditation: 12 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this event
This 2 day conference combined commentary from key industry and legal experts from the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and the US on: Injunctions and jurisdictions; Standards, FRAND and its use in Europe; Patent portfolios; Unified Patents Court; Dispute resolution on licensing terms; and Competition considerations. Through a combination of panel discussions, presentations and keynote addresses, the aim of this flagship event was to inform and update on the very latest developments with the benefit of the views and insights of leading authorities including from the industry, the judiciary and private practice in this complex and very topical field.

Wednesday 31 October 2013
UCL Britain and Europe Lecture Series
Symposium on An International Bill of Rights of Man: 
Where Next?
  • Discussants: Sir Elihu Lauterpacht QC CBE; And contributions from: Anthony Speaight QC (4 Pump Court); Baroness Helena Kennedy of the Shaws QC (Labour Member, House of Lords); Lord McNally (Minister of State at the Ministry of Justice, and Deputy Leader of the House of Lords); and Stuart Wheeler (Treasurer, United Kingdom Independence Party)
  • Chair: Prof. Philippe Sands QC (UCL / Matrix Chambers)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
UCL hosted a symposium on the occasion of the re-publication of Hersch Lauterpacht's An International Bill of Rights of Man, with an Introduction by Professor Philippe Sands, UCL, published by Oxford University Press
Tuesday 29 October 2013
UCL Institute for Human Rights
Doctors of the Dark Side - a film showing and discussion panel
  • Welcome: Dr Amanda C de C Williams (UCL Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology)
  • Discussants: Prof. Philippe Sands QC (UCL Laws); Dr Nimisha Patel (UEL International Centre for Health and Human Rights); Dr Anita Berlin (Institute of Epidemiology & Health)
  • Chair: Dr Saladin Meckled-Garcia (UCL Institute for Human Rights
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
Doctors on the Dark Side is a documentary (Directed by Martha Davis) which exposes how psychologists and physicians implemented and covered up the torture of detainees in US-controlled military prisons. The stories of four detainees and the doctors involved in their abuse show how essential doctors have been to the torture program, and how professional bodies for medicine and psychology responded to their members’ involvement in torture.
Tuesday 29 October 2013
UCL Centre for Law & Ethics Debate with Lexis-Nexis
Legal Innovation: How should the Educators respond?
  • Panellists: Christina Blacklaws (Co-operative Legal Services), Carl Lygo (BPP), Dana Denis Smith (Obelisk), Prof. Paul Maharg (ANU's Centre for Australian Legal Education / Nottingham Trent University), and Geoff Wild (Kent County Council Legal Services)
  • Chair: Professor Dame Hazel Genn DBE QC (Dean, UCL Laws)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
With Phase 2 of the Legal Education and Training review upon us, we brought together leading innovators in legal services with two leading legal educators to discuss how the changing nature of legal services impacts on legal education.
Thursday 24 October 2013
UCL Current Legal Problems Lectures
‘Frenzied Law Making’: Overcriminalisation by Numbers
  • Speaker: Prof. James Chalmers, University of Glasgow
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this event
The New Labour government was accused of frenzied law making, creating a criminal offence for every day spent in office. The current government, responding to these concerns, has introduced a “gateway” mechanism to halt the tide of criminalisation. New research suggests that the accusations levelled against the last government badly underestimated the reality: criminal offences were – and despite the gateway mechanism, are still – created at a far greater rate than one a day. But what does this actually mean, and what should we do about it?
Wednesday 16 October 2013
UCL Institute of Brand and Innovation Law (IBIL)
Question the Trade Mark Judges
  • Speakers: Mr Justice Birss; Allan James (UK IPO); Anna Carboni (Appointed Person); and Tony Willoughby (Adjudicator of domain name disputes for WIPO and Nominet and Chair of Nominet Expert Review Group)
  • Chair: Prof. Sir Robin Jacob, UCL IBIL
  • Accreditation: 1.5 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)

About this event
This event provided an update of the laws around trade marks. The chair, Professor Sir Robin Jacob, posed a set of pre-selected questions from the audience 
Thursday 10 October 2013
UCL Current Legal Problems Lectures
The Implied Term of Honesty and Fair Dealing
  • Speaker: Prof. Hugh Collins, LSE
  • Chair: The Rt Hon Lady Justice Arden DBE
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this talk
The subject concerns the introduction of implied obligations with respect to the performance of contracts, particularly with respect to types of contracts that are sometimes described as relational contracts (such as agency, distributorship, and employment). This lecture, in particular, will consider the nature of these implied obligations and their relation to the idea of good faith, whether these obligations are terms implied in fact or in law, which in turn raises questions about the category of relational contracts itself.
Tuesday 8 October 2013
UCL Britain & Europe Series
'Your power to veto EU changes'? Implications of the referendum provisions in the European Union Act 2011
  • Speakers: Professor Paul Craig, University of Oxford; Professor Robert Hazell, UCL; Professor Stephen Tierney, University of Edinburgh; and
  • Chair: Dr Jeff King,UCL
  • Accreditation: 1.5 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this talk
The UK's European Union Act 2011 has instituted procedures designed to curtail the ability of Ministers and of the UK Parliament itself to approve certain decisions involving the extension or alteration of EU treaty rights or powers, or the taking of EU decisions under existing powers, unless such action is supported by a popular UK-wide referendum. As Foreign Secretary William Hague put it, “Now you have the power to veto EU changes”. These 'referendum lock' provisions have implications for the British constitution as well as for the UK's role in the EU. Three of Britain's leading constitutional and EU law scholars will discuss these implications in a stimulating debate.
Wednesday 2 October 2013
International Law Association (British Branch) Lecture
Autonomous Weapons and Responsibility Under International Law
  • Speaker: Professor Dan Saxon, Leiden University College, The Hague
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour (SRA and BSB (pending))
About this talk
'Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it', wrote Santayana at the dawn of the twentieth century. And indeed, throughout history, politicians and policy-makers have -- more or less self-consciously -- turned to the lessons of their nation's past to shape their judgement and inform their decision making. I shall be asking the question, 'Is this a strategy which can be followed today?' when the boundaries of nationhood are giving way to global histories and narratives in which forgetting is as important as remembering.
Thursday 25 July 2013
UCL Centre for Criminal Law with Old Bailey Chambers
Expert Evidence
  • Speaker: Professor Ian Dennis (Director, UCL Centre for Criminal Law, and Door Tenant at Old Bailey Chambers) and Professor Nigel Eastman (Consultant Psychiatrist)
  • Accreditation: 1.5 CPD hour per day (SRA and BSB) by Old Bailey Chambers
About this talk
This event covered an update of the law of expert evidence, including admissibility, duties of an expert witness and current controversies, as well as a case-study of psychiatric evidence relating to partial defence of murder.
Thursday 18 July 2013
UCL Bentham Project - Bentham and Colombia
Teaching the influence of Bentham on Colombia through new technologies and Internet resources.
  • Speaker: Professor Gonzalo Ramírez, Universidad Externado de Colombia
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this talk
Professor Ramírez discussed the topic of Bentham and Colombia and in his second seminar in the series, he explored how this influence can be taught through new approaches and methods, such as via the use of Internet resources.
Thursday 11 July 2013
UCL Current Legal Problems Lecture
The Achilleas: Forsaking Foreseeability
  • Speaker: Professor Victor Goldberg (Columbia University) Chair: Lord Collins of Mapesbury
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour per day (SRA and BSB)
About this event
In The Achilleas, the House of Lords gave the most recent interpretation of Hadley v. Baxendale and the limits on the recovery of consequential damages. Lord Hoffmann rejected the emphasis on foreseeability and “the requisite degree of probability of loss,” proposing instead on the tacit assumption of the parties. This paper providds a theoretical framework for ascertaining the tacit assumption and applies it to the particular facts of The Achilleas.
Thursday 11 July 2013
UCL Bentham Project - Bentham and Colombia
The Influence of Bentham on Colombia during the 19th Century
  • Speaker: Professor Gonzalo Ramírez, Universidad Externado de Colombia
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
Professor Ramírez discussed the topic of Bentham and Colombia in two distinct ways. His first seminar will concentrate on Bentham's influence on Colombia during the 19th Century.
Monday 1 & Tuesday 2 July 2013
Curent Legal Issues Colloquium
Law and Michael Freeman
  • About the event: The UCL Faculty of Laws is celebrating Professor Michael Freeman's extraordinary contribution to legal scholarship over the course of his distinguished career in the 2013 Current Legal Issues Colloquium.
  • Accreditation: 6.5 CPD hour per day (SRA and BSB (pending))
About this event
The themes of the Colloquium encompassed children's rights, corporal punishment of children, family and child law generally, medical ethics and the law, jurisprudence, Jewish law and legal systems/legal pluralism, all areas of research to which Michael has made significant contributions. Leading international scholars and practitioners from each of these areas presented their current work and some are reflecting specifically upon Michael's contributions to the field. Michael freeman also gave the keynote lecture on the evening of the first day of the colloquium, on 'Rethinking Children's Rights', chaired by Baroness Hale of Richmond
View the full programme
Wednesday 19 June 2013
UCL / Bindman Debate
International Human Rights Breaches - State Accountability v State Immunity
  • Panel includes: Prof. Eileen Denza CMG; Omar Deghayes, Cageprisoners, former Guantanamo prisoner; Ben Emmerson QC, Matrix Chambers; and Julian Knowles QC, Matrix Chambers
  • Chair: Professor Geraldine Van Bueren QC, Queen Mary's College, London
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
The UCL / Bindmans Debate will provide a forum to discuss the issues surrounding international human rights breaches. The pros and cons will be considered in what will be a lively debate


View the film of this event
Wednesday 19 June 2013
UCL Centre for Law, Economics and Society
The Limits of Competition Law in Latin America: A Conversation with Julián Peña
  • Panel includes: Prof. Julian Pena
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
As Latin America continues to thrive amidst the global economic downturn, the quality of competition law regimes and industrial policies has been the subject of recent discussions and political activities. The increasing internationalisation of Latin American firms and shifting political scenarios are testing the adequacy of the competition law regimes in this region. The time is ripe for a thoughtful discussion about what Latin America has achieved so far and the changes to be implemented regarding the protection and promotion of competition. Julian Peña, one of the leading experts in this topic, will join us for a conversation about the current state of competition law in Latin America. He will present his latest work "The Limits of Competition Law in Latin America", recently published in "The Global Limits of Competition Law" (Ioannis Lianos & Daniel Sokol, Eds.).

View the film of this event
June 2013
Centre for Law, Economics and Society
CPD course on Innovation, Competition Law and IP Rights
  • Speaker: Professor Herbert Hovenkamp, University of Iowa School of Law and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
  • Accreditation: 16 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this course
In the modern knowledge economy companies are striving to achieve competitive advantage by expanding their IP rights portfolio. For this companies are employing IP as a way to harm their competitors or as a monetary exchange in IP related transactions. However as recent litigation in the pharmaceutical sector demonstrates competition law and IP law disputes are interconnected. This course will analyse the value of competition law in addressing a variety of practices used in innovation-intensive markets. These include the interconnection of networks, ‘duties to deal’, the licensing and distribution of IP rights (standard setting organisations and patent pools) and reverse settlements as adopted by firms active in the manufacturing and delivery of services or non-practising entities, drawing from examples in both EU and US law. The course considered the uses and limitations of competition law and policy as a vehicle for promoting innovation. It also examined realistic reforms that can be undertaken in IP law and competition law across various sectors of the economy as well as the practical implications of that interaction for a number of commercial practices.
Wednesay 12 June 2013
UCL Institute of Brand and Innovation Law (IBIL)
supported by Taylor Wessing LLP
Community Trade Marks - Are they a Swiss Cheese? Do Community Trade Marks still have unitary effect in the EU?
  • Speaker: Prof. Dr. Joachmin Bornkamm (German Supreme Court)
  • Chair: Prof. Sir Robin Jacob (IBIL)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this event
This annual lecture honours the memory of Professor Sir Hugh Laddie, former UCL Professor of Intellectual Property Law and Court of Appeal Judge.
Tuesday 11 June 2013
UCL Institute of Brand and Innovation Law (IBIL)
with Taylor Wessing LLP
The role of experts and scientific advisors in patent litigation around the European Union
  • Speakers: Prof. Sir Robin Jacob (IBIL); Judge Sharon Prost (Federal Judge, United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit); Judge Edger F. Brinkman (Senior Judge, District Court of The Hague, The Netherlands); Judge Mine Reimnitz (Landgericht, Dusseldorf) Nigel Stoate (Taylor Wessing); Professor Michael Yudkin (University of Oxford; Scientific Advisor to the House of Lords in Kirin-Amgen); Dr Roger S. Newton (Former Director of the Chemical Research Division of Glaxo Group Research Limited, expert witness in several trials before the UK Patents Court); Professor David Limebeer (Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford; Expert witness in several cases and scientific advisor to the Court of Appeal in one); Christoph de Coster (Taylor Wessing, Germany); Pedro Merino Baylos (Baylos Abogados, Spain); Ruprecht Hermans (Brinkof Advocaten, Netherlands); Thomas Bouvet (Veron & Associes, France); Jonas Westerberg (Lindahl Advokatfirman, Sweden); Klaus Ewald Madsen (Bech Bruun, Denmark); Andrea Mondini (Schellenberg Wittmer, Switzerland); Fabrizio Jacobacci (Jacobacci, Italy);
  • Accreditation: 6.5 CPD hour per day (SRA and BSB)
About this event
This day conference focused on the role of experts and scientific advisors in patent litigation around the EU. It has speakers from the USA, The Netherlands, Germany, UK, Spain, France, Sweden, Denmark, Switzerland and Italy. It also includes judicial input from the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit of the USA, UK, Germany and Holland.  For the first time ever, some experts who have given evidence in patent actions and scientific advisors to the court have been gathered together to give their views on the subject.
Monday 10 June 2013
UCL Centre for Law, Economics and Society Conference
Theory and Practice of Regulatory Impact Assessments in Europe: A Comparative and Interdisciplinary Perspective
  • Topics covered include: One tool, many uses ? : Regulatory impact assessment, public policy and institutions; The contribution of the regulatory impact assessment tool in reframing "public policy" analysis; Regulatory impact assessments and their actors; and Regulatory impact assessments as political arguments.
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
The conference aims to examine in a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective the implementation of impact assessment in the European Union (EU) and Member States of the EU.
Thursday 6 June 2013
UCL Institute for Human Rights with the Equal Rights Trust
Poverty and Rights: Can and Should the Law Promote Socio-Economic Equality?
  • Speakers: Judge Claire L’Heureux-Dubé (Judge of the Supreme Court of Canada 1987-2002); Judge Kate O’Regan (Judge of the South African Constitutional Court 1994 – 2009); Dr Octavio Ferraz (Associate Professor of Law at the University of Warwick); and Dr Virginia Mantouvalou (Co-Director of the UCL Institute for Human Rights and Lecturer in Law)
  • Chair:Professor Sir Bob Hepple QC, Chair of the Equal Rights Trust
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
In these times of austerity, the impact of public spending cuts on the most disadvantaged is in the spotlight. With research suggesting that the poor are disproportionately negatively impacted by spending cuts, the question of whether the law should step in on their behalf to challenge public spending decisions is at the fore. The longstanding divide between those who think that it is not the place of the law to redistribute resources and those who think socio-economic rights cannot be fully realised without such redistribution, is reignited. Can equality law be used to transform human rights? Should the law lift people out of poverty? What is the appropriate role of the law in advancing the equal enjoyment of social rights such as the rights to health and education? Can the courts promote socio-economic equality without usurping the role of the state in determining resource allocation? Does it matter?
Thursday 6 June 2013
UCL & Baker & McKenzie Third Annual Lecture on International Law and Litigation:
Investment Treaty Arbitration: An International Lawyer's Perspective
  • Speakers: Prof. Brigitte Stern (University of Paris I - Panthéon-Sorbonne
  • Accreditation: 1.5 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this talk
This lecture assessed investment treaty arbitration through the eyes of a public international lawyer, and the lens of public international law. Contrary to a purely “commercial” approach to the resolution of disputes between foreign investors and States – which tend to proceed on the basis that both actors are to be treated as similar economic entities acting in the same playing field – this perspective offers the necessary and invaluable contribution of public international law. Such law takes into account the public nature of these disputes, and the specificities and functions of sovereign States, on questions such as interpretation, attribution and the consequences of the application of general principles of international law..
May / June 2013
Claims for Damages in Competition Law and Intellectual Property Law: Legal Framework and Economic Principles for the Evaluation of Damages
  • Speakers: Vincent Smith (Sheppard and Smith) and Peter Davis (CompassLexecon)
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
About this course:
The course examined the legal framework for claims for damages in EU and UK competition law as well as in intellectual property law and the economic principles for the evaluation of damages in these contexts. The topic is of particular importance in view of the increasing numbers of competition law claims for damages in the UK, the harmonization initiatives at the EU level, the recent reforms envisaged in UK competition law promoting private enforcement and the importance of damages claims for infringement of IP rights, in view of the issues raised by other forms of protection of IP rights, such as injunctions.
Wednesday 5 June 2013
UCL Centre for Law, Economics and Society Conference
Evidence in Competition Law Proceedings: A Comparative Perspective

Panel 1: Economic evidence and public enforcement of competition law 
Chair: Ioannis Lianos (UCL)
Speakers:

  • Robert Stillman (CRA)
  • Katy Collyer (OFT)
  • Kai-Uwe Kuhn (European Commission) 
  • Howard Shelanski (US Federal Trade Commission) 

Panel 2: How much is enough? Standard of proof and cogency of evidence in competition law 
Chair: Judge Douglas Ginsburg (DC Circuit, Court of Appeals)
Speakers:

Panel 3: Limitations to evidence gathering (e.g. Legal privileges) 
Chair: Ioannis Lianos (UCL)
Speakers:

  • Antonio Bavasso (Allen & Overy, UCL)
  • Cerry Darbon (Liberty Global Media) 
  • Marc Hansen (Latham & Watkins)
    DOWNLOAD SLIDES
  • Paul Lasok (Monckton Chambers)
  • Florian Wagner von Papp (UCL)
    DOWNLOAD SLIDES

Panel 4: Economic evidence and the judiciary 
Chair: Judge Frederic Jenny (OECD, OFT, ESSEC, UCL)
Speakers:

  • Judge Douglas Ginsburg (DC Circuit, Court of Appeals) 
  • Herbert Hovenkamp (University of Iowa, School of Law)
  • Judge Frederic Jenny (OECD, OFT, ESSEC, UCL) 
  • Mr Justice Roth (Competition Appeal Tribunal) 
  • James Flynn QC (Brick Court Chambers)

About this event
This conference examined the topic of Competition Law Evidence, including the way competition law evidence is collected and assessed by competition authorities in Europe and in the US and the increasing role of the judiciar. It discussed practical issues relating to the standard of proof, the differences between adversarial and inquisitorial processes, the limits to evidence gathering set by the Legal Professional Privilege, the Privilege Against Self-Incrimination and rights of defense in general. The conference also shed light on an unexplored but fascinating area of law enforcement. The speakers, global leaders in this field of law, came from the judiciary, competition authorities, academia and practice.

  • Accreditation: 6.5 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)

 

 

 

Tuesday 4 June 2013
UCL Institute for Human Rights
The New Commonwealth Model of Constitutionaliam: Theory and Practice
  • Speakers: Professor Stephen Gardbaum (MacArthur Foundation Professor of International Justice and Human Rights, UCLA)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
This lecture, based on the book of the same title, argued that recent bills of rights in Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Australia are an experiment in a new third way of organizing basic institutional arrangements in a democracy. This ‘new Commonwealth model of constitutionalism’ promises both an alternative to the conventional dichotomy of legislative versus judicial supremacy and innovative techniques for protecting rights.
Thursday 16 May 2013
Current Legal Problems Lecture
Drones, Morality and International Law
  • Speaker: Prof. David Luban (Georgetown University)
  • Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA and BSB
About this event
The US use of weaponized drones in Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia raises profound questions of morality and law. Are drone killings legitimate acts of self-defense, or extrajudicial murders? Are drones nothing more than a useful military technology, or do they transform the very nature of war? This talk explored these issues from the standpoint of just war theory and international law. 
Tuesday 14 May 2013
UCL Labour Rights Institute
Cure the disease and kill the patient – Labour rights in Greece after 3-years of Austerity
  • Speakers: Dr Aristea Koukiadaki (Lecturer in Employment Studies, University of Manchester); Dr Lefteris Kretsos (Senior Lecturer in Employment Relations, University of Greenwich); Dr Giuseppe Casale (Director, ILO Department of Labour Administration); and Colm O’Cinneide (Reader in Laws, UCL; Vice-President of the European Committee of Social Rights)
  • Accreditation: 2 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
About this event
This small symposium focused on the state of labour law in Greece after 3-years of austerity and deregulatory reforms partly introduced to satisfy the requirements imposed by the EU Commission-ECB-IMF Memoranda of Understanding accompanying the country’s two main bailout packages of May 2010 and February 2012. This event proposes to debate in greater detail the labour law, industrial relations and human rights implications of these reforms from a national, European, and ILO perspective.
Friday 10 & Saturday 11 May 2013
Annual Bentham House Conference
Philosophical Foundations of Contract Law
  • Speakers: Aditi Bagchi (Fordham); Randy Barnett (Georgetown); Lisa Bernstein (Chicago); Charles Fried (Harvard); Avery Katz (Columbia); Dori Kimel (Oxford); Gregory Klass (Georgetown); Jody Kraus (Columbia); George Letsas (UCL); Daniel Markovits (Yale); Liam Murphy (NYU); David Owens (Reading); James Penner (UCL); Margaret Jane Radin (Michigan); Joseph Raz (Columbia / KCL); Prince Saprai (UCL); Stephen Smith (McGill); Robert Stevens (Oxford); Charlie Webb (LSE)
  • Accreditation: 6 CPD hour per day (SRA and BSB)
About this event
The focus of this two-day conference was on general themes in the contract theory literature, including for example the nature of promising and more generally voluntary obligations, economic, instrumental and pluralistic conceptions of contract, the relationship between contract and other moral concerns such as fault, and the application of these more abstract philosophical ideas to specific doctrinal issues, such as contract formation, contract interpretation, unfair terms, defences and remedies.
Wednesday 1 May 2013
A half-day Conference
Negotiating Religion: Inquiries into the History and Present of Religious Accommodation
  • Speakers:
    Ben Kaplan (UCL) on Negotiating Religious Differences in Europe in the Wake of the Reformations
    Maleiha Malik (KCL) on Protecting Freedom of Religion in the Secular Age
    Cécile Laborde (UCL) on Religion without God, and Some Problems with Liberal Neutrality
    Craig Calhoun (LSE) “Secularism without Disenchantment”?
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
Throughout history, religious belief and religious affiliation have been powerful factors in shaping human societies. They have defined individual identities and communities, governed the relationship between commonwealths, and inspired human creativity. Religious visions, hopes and fears also stimulated conflict and unleashed violence. For an overwhelming and growing majority of people living on our planet today, religious belief answers questions central to their existence. It allows them to cope with difficult or decisive moments and structures everyday life. It seems that over the past generations, differences regarding the place and role of religious belief have grown considerably. In a world marked more than ever before by migration and global connectivity, societies which tend towards religious neutrality or indifference need to define anew their relationship to communities with strong religious commitments. In the past as well as today, the relationship between individual and community, between different confessions and religious communities, between these communities and the state, are negotiated in complex processes of moderation, sometimes involving conflict or even violence. This conference is the closing event of a four-worshop series which took place at UCL in 2010-12. It offers a cross-disciplinary assessment of these different forms in which religious identity, commitment and community are negotiated in the contemporary world. Without claiming to exhaust the topic, it proposes to look at the agents, procedures and outcomes of these negotiations, and hopefully will evaluate the potentials and limits of negotiation of religion.
22 - 25 April 2013
The 2013 Quain Lectures
The Normativity of Law
  • Speaker: Professor Joseph Raz (Columbia / King's College London)
  • Accreditation: These talks are not accredited for CPD
About this event
The Quain Lectures were founded as an annual event in 2012, with Professor Phillip Pettit of Princeton University being the inaugural speaker. This years lecturer, Joseph Raz, is one of the most important and influential figures in contemporary legal and political philosophy. He will deliver three one hour lectures on the Normativity of Law.

Download the papers for these talks
Tuesday 23 April 2013
UCL Centre for Law and Governance in Europe Symposium
The Melloni and Åkerberg Fransson judgments: The incoming tide of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights?
  • Speakers: Prof Piet Eeckhout (UCL Laws); Dr Clemens Ladenburger (EU Commission Legal Service) ; Prof Aida Torres Pérez (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona) ; Prof Takis Tridimas (Queen Mary, University of London);
  • Accreditation:This event was accredited with 2 CPD hours by the SRA and BSB
About this event
The symposium explored the recent landmark judgments of the EU Court of Justice in Case C-399/11 Stefano Melloni and Case C-617/10 Åkerberg Fransson (26 February 2013). The judgments made important statements about the scope, meaning and effect of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.
Tuesday 16 April 2013
New Work in Property & Trusts Symposium
  • Speakers: Michael Ashdown (Oxford) Tatiana Cutts (Oxford) Ying Khai Liew (KCL) Nick Piska (Kent) Rachael Walsh (TCD) Emma Waring (York)
  • Commentators: Richard Nolan (York), Ben McFarlane (UCL), Charles Mitchell (UCL), Josh Getzler (Oxford)
About this workshop
The aim of the symposium was to promote and assist new work in property law and trusts by providing "early career" scholars with a forum to discuss their current research projects and the opportunity to meet other scholars working in the same areas. Each of the six speakers presented a paper, which was commented on by an expert in the field, and then discussed more widely. Attendance was by invitation only. This year's symposium will be the first in an annual series: anyone interested in presenting a paper at, or attending, next year's sympoisum should contact Charles Mitchell (charles.mitchell@ucl.ac.uk) or Ben McFarlane (ben.mcfarlane@ucl.ac.uk)
Wednesay 27 March 2013
Science, Politics and Transnational Regulation: Regulatory Scientific Institutions and the Dilemmas of Hybrid Authority
  • Speaker: Oren Perez (Bar-Ilan University - Faculty of Law)
About this event
The main objective of this talk was to develop a better understanding of the structure of transnational regulatory scientific institutions (RSIs). The speaker argued that the hybrid political-legal-epistemic nature of RSIs creates a continual tension between their hierarchical and policy-driven structure and the paradigms of objectivity, parallelism and non-centralism that characterize science.
Thursday 21 March 2013
Inaugural Lecture and Bentham Association Presidential Address
IP Law: Keep Calm and Carry On?
by Professor Sir Robin Jacob (UCL)

 VIEW THE VIDEO OF THIS LECTURE
About this lecture:
This talk inaugurated the Sir Hugh Laddie Chair in Intellectual Property Law and was also the 2013 Bentham Association Presidential Address. The Bentham Association is the UCL Laws Alumni association.

Friday 15 March 2013
UCL Institute for Human Rights
Bridging the divide - Matters to be taken into account in relation to the integration of equality bodies and human rights institutions
  • Speaker: Morten Kjaerum, Director, EU Agency for Fundamental Rights
    Colm O'Cinneide, Reader in Law, University College London
    Alan Miller, Chair, European Group of National Human Rights Institutions
    Jozef de Witte, Chair European Network of Equality Bodies
    Sarah Spencer, Senior Fellow, Centre for Migration, Policy and Society, University of Oxford
    Vladlen Stefanov, Chief, National Institutions and Regional Mechanisms Section, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
    David Langtry, Acting Chief Commissioner, Canadian Human Rights Commission
About this event
A number of European Union countries have, are or plan to integrate the functions of their national equality body and human rights institution within a single organisation. This conference provided an opportunity to discuss and debate the emerging findings and their implications with both the research team and international experts. It will feed into the final report of the study and associated guidance for policy-makers and practitioners. This was a closed event with attendance by invitation only.
Thursday 14 March 2013
Current Legal Problems Lecture
Can Economic Sociology save Law and Development?
  • Speaker: Professor Amanda Perry-Kassaris, SOAS, University of London
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD by the SRA (BSB pending)
About this talk:
Professor Amanda Perry-Kessaris argued that 'Law and development' is a field of inquiry and practice of ever-greater significance and ever-diminishing coherence for which economic sociology offers a possible lifeboat. The substantive focus of the field is best defined, and that substance is best approached, using the analytical, empirical and normative components of economic sociology. However, plenty of law and development work has been, and will continue to be, done using other approaches. So an economic sociology of law and development will probably only become seaworthy once it is communicated in an open source visual form.
Wednesday 13 March 2013
UCL Legal & Social Philosophy Colloquium
Giving Desert its due
  • Speaker: Professor T.M. Scanlon, Harvard University
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About the speaker:
T.M. Scanlon is Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity at Harvard University. He received his B.A. from Princeton in 1962 and his Ph.D. from Harvard. In between, he studied for a year at Oxford as a Fulbright Fellow. He taught at Princeton from 1966 before joining Harvard in 1984.
Tuesday 12 March 2013
UCL Laws Symposium
The Eweida Decision
  • Speakers: Professor Mark Hill QC (Cardiff University), Dr Ronan McCrea (UCL), Professor Aileen McColgan (King's College London), Professor Christopher McCrudden (Queen's University Belfast)
  • Chair: The Rt Hon Lord Justice Elias
  • Accreditation: This event is accredited with 2 CPD by the SRA (BSB pending)
About this event
The Eweida decision heralded significant changes in the law on freedom of religion in the workplace and its relationship to other rights. It is likely to have a major importance for the development of European and domestic law on anti-discrimination and on workplace regulation of religious clothing and conduct. The symposium rought together four speakers all of whom are both academics and barristers and all of whom acted for parties or interveners in this case.
Tuesday 12 March 2013
UCL Institute for Human Rights with Waging Peace
A Decade of Darfur: Why the genocide continues today
  • Speakers: Dr Mukesh Kapila, UN Representative on Sudan in 2004 and whistler blower on the genocide. Author of 'Against a Tide of Evil', released 14th March 2013
    Baroness Goudie, campaigner on women's rights
    Mariam Suleiman, Chairperson Darfur Victims Organisation
    Olivia Warham, Director of Waging Peace
  • Chair: Martin Plaut, Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, ex BBC Africa Editor
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
Ten years ago, the Sudanese regime unleashed a systematic genocide in Darfur which continues to this day, away from media attention. Khartoum's policy of ethnic cleansing destroyed 90% of black African villages, killing an estimated 300,000 people. Today, three million people who fled the violence live mostly in camps, but their lives are still fraught with danger. Waging Peace and UCL are hosting a discussion of the current situation in Darfur and life in the camps in particular

Thursday 7 March 2013
Inaugural Lecture
Human Rights and the Autonomy of EU Law: Pluralism or Integration?

  • Speaker: Professor Piet Eechhout, UCL Laws
  • Chair: Sir Francis Jacob
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD by the SRA (BSB pending)
About this talk:
The EU's accession to the ECHR raises questions about the autonomy of EU law, and about the relationship between the the EU Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights. The lecture will critique the prevailing theories of legal/constitutional pluralism, and propose an alternative paradigm: the integration of laws. Within integrated legal systems, the argument goes, conflicts between supreme adjudicators can be resolved from within the law. There is a law of integration, and the relationships between supreme/constitutional courts are governed by a principle of limited and shared jurisdiction.
Monday 4 March 2013
A Lunchtime Public Law Lecture
The Future of the UK Bill of Rights
  • Speaker: Professor Philippe Sands QC, UCL Laws / Matrix Chambers
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this talk:
In December of 2012, the Commission on a UK Bill of Rights presented their findings in a paper marked by a deep lack of consensus. On the surface, this division was attributed to the polarized political standpoints within the Commission. For the minority, Philippe Sands QC, a Liberal Democrat adviser, opposed the introduction of a UK Bill of Rights on three grounds: devolution, responses to the Commissions' consultations, and decoupling the UK from the European Convention on Human Rights. Supporting a UK Bill of Rights became a smokescreen for severing Britain's relationship with Strasbourg – an unwarranted departure from the Commissions' framework of reference. Philippe Sands QC will speak of his experience of working for the Commission, and he will address the future implications of their Report. Will calls for a UK Bill of Rights resurge after the 2014 Scottish Referendum on independence? Or will the existing Human Rights Act by then become regarded as a "UK Bill of Rights in all but name"?.
Friday 1 March 2013
London Roman Law Group
Carriage by Sea
  • Speaker: Professor Paul J. du Plessis, University of Edinburgh
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this talk
This paper was concerned with the Roman law of maritime transport of goods. It explored the legal rules governing this form of transport of goods and the management structures employed by owners of maritime vessels to facilitate the transport of cargo. Using legal and archeological evidence, it argued that the legal solutions created by the Roman jurists were also informed by 'real life' problems, as opposed to purely intellectual concerns, and that more attention needs to paid to these 'contexts' in order to enhance modern understanding of this area of Roman private law
Thursday 28 February 2013
Current Legal Problems Lecture
Minorities, Pluralism and the Law
  • Speaker: Professor Maleiha Malik, Dickson Poon School of Law, King's College London
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge and open to all
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD by the SRA only
About this talk:
This lecture explored the different ways in which a liberal democracy can accommodate the claims of those from minority groups who want to make legal decisions in tune with their culture and beliefs. As part of this discussion, it also examined the rights of those 'minorities within minorities' who are vulnerable to pressure to comply with the norms of their social group.Finally, the lecture pointed out some of the advantages and disadvantages of the practical ways in which the state can respond to and work with minorities who want to follow their own distinct norms to regulate their individual and community life.
Wednesday 27 February 2013
Institute of Brand and Innovation Law (IBIL) Annual Brands Lecture
Assessing confusion in trade mark and passing off cases
  • Speakers: Tony Durham, Director of Shopper Insights at Procter and Gamble; Dr Jane Leighton, Consultant at Nielsen Neurofocus; Tony Willoughby; and Mark McKenna, Professor of Intellectual Property, Notre Dame Law School
  • Chair: The Hon Mr Justice Arnold
  • Venue: UCL Central Campus
  • Admission:Fees apply
  • Accreditation: 1.5 CPD by the SRA and the BSB and constitutes relevant CPD for IPReg
About this talk
Confusion plays a fundamental role in establishing passing off and infringement and registrability in trade mark cases and yet, what is required to show confusion is underexplored. This seminar considered the issue from a legal perspective, in terms of what courts in the UK and the US require of parties in order to show confusion, and through the examination of cutting-edge consumer behavioural science and marketing research.

Watch this lecture online on the IBIL website
Wednesday 27 February 2013
UCL Legal & Social Philosophy Colloquium
Proportionality: Diagnostic, not Constitutive
  • Speaker: Dr George Letsas, UCL
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
Download the discussion paper
Thursday 21 February 2013
Centre for Law, Economics and Society
Libor, Screening and Reform
  • Speakers: Dr Rosa Abrantes-Metz (Principal, Global Economics Group; and Adjunct Professor, Stern School of Business, New York University)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD by the SRA and BSB
  • DOWNLOAD LECTURE SLIDES
About this talk
Investigations into a conspiracy to manipulate the U.S. dollar London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR") and other comparable benchmarks have been launched worldwide. Some of the banks involved have already settled with authorities for record amounts. The LIBOR scandal is potentially the most significant financial manipulation in history, and it was first publicly flagged by simple, but powerful, statistical analyses known as screens. While LIBOR is the most significant success of these techniques, it is not the first, nor will it be the last. This presentation will review the principles of screens, how they worked for LIBOR as early as 2008, and how should LIBOR be reformed.
Thursday 21 February 2013
Inaugural Lecture
Understanding Equitable Estoppel
  • Speaker: Professor Ben McFarlane, UCL Laws
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge and open to all
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD by the SRA and the BSB
About this talk
The lecture considered two notoriously complex areas of English law: promissory estoppel and proprietary estoppel. It will be argued that these doctrines can only be understood if we identify and isolate the specific principles that lie behind their operation. It will be suggested that each doctrine is in fact based on a number of distinct concepts. It is, therefore, a mistake to look for a broad principle that underlies either doctrine; and it would be a bigger mistake to unite the two doctrines into a single category of equitable estoppel. Rather, we should carefully examine each of the specific principles behind the doctrines. In doing so, we can identify a crucial and often overlooked point: English law recognises that a claim can arise to prevent one party suffering a detriment as a result of his or her reasonable reliance on another's promise.
Wednesday 20 February 2013
UCL / ILA (British Branch) Lecture
Reducing Genocide to Law: Definition, Meaning, and the Ultimate Crime
  • Speaker: Professor Payam Akhavan (Professor of International Law at McGill University
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD by the SRA only
About this talk
Could the prevailing view that genocide is the ultimate crime be wrong? Is it possible that it is actually on an equal footing with war crimes and crimes against humanity? Is the power of the word genocide derived from something other than jurisprudence? And why should a hierarchical abstraction assume such importance in conferring meaning on suffering and injustice? Could reducing a reality that is beyond reason and words into a fixed category undermine the very progress and justice that such labelling purports to achieve? For some, these questions may border on the international law equivalent of blasphemy. Professor Akhavan's original and daring book entitled 'Reducing Genocide to Law', on which his lecture will be based, is a probing reflection on empathy and our faith in global justice.
Tuesday 19 February 2013
Institute for Human Rights
Whose Poor?/Who's Poor?: The Significance of Relative Deprivation
  • Speaker: Professor Judith Lichtenberg (Georgetown University)
  • Chair: Professor John Tasioulas (UCL Laws)
  • Accreditation:This event ws not accredited for CPD
About this talk
According to one recent estimate, the poorest five percent of Americans are richer than two thirds of the world's people. But such comparisons can be misleading. Contemporary philosophers have been preoccupied with determining whether we have special moral obligations to members of our own society - for example, our poor compatriots - that we do not have to those outside our society. But they have neglected to ask how to compare the situations of poor people in one society to poor people in another. Judith Lichtenberg argues that for a variety of reasons, well-being is largely relative: how well off you are depends to a great extent on how well off others around you are. This fact has complex implications, which she explores, for our responsibilities for benefiting poor compatriots as opposed to poor people in developing countries.
Wednesday 13 February
WTO Scholars' Forum:
Monetary Measures and Trade - Do GATT Articles XV:4 and XV:9(a) Open the Door for Non-Violation Nullification or Impairment Complaints?
  • Speakers: Dr Claus Zimmermann, Sidley Austin
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited for CPD
About this talk
Over the recent years, there has been much academic debate on the extent to which contested exchange rate practices, such as the maintenance of an undervalued real exchange rate, could be challenged successfully under WTO law, most notably as a prohibited export subsidy. The focus of this paper was different as it examines the extent to which non-violation nullification or impairment complaints under GATT Article XXIII:1(b) could be brought against contested monetary measures in light of the interaction between the provisions enshrined in GATT Article XV:4 and GATT Article XV:9(a).
Thursday 7 February 2013
Inaugural Lecture
Equitable Compensation for Breach of Fiduciary Duty
  • Speaker: Professor Charles Mitchell, UCL Laws
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD by the SRA and BSB
About this talk
'Equity, in the exercise of its exclusive jurisdiction over trustees and fiduciaries ... does not award compensation for loss.' So wrote Lord Millett in 2005. Yet in recent years his words have been roundly ignored in courts throughout the Commonwealth. Awards of equitable compensation, or even 'damages', for breach of fiduciary duty are frequently made, and claims for such a remedy are the everyday work of Chancery and commercial practitioners. The lecture will review this development and consider a series of questions: what idea of fiduciary duty actuated the rule that compensation was not available for breach of this duty; now that compensation is available, what are the consequences of this for our understanding of the duty and the other remedies available for its breach; how are compensatory awards for breach of fiduciary duty assessed; and what defences can be raised in answer to claims for such a remedy?
Wednesday 6 February 201
Centre for Ethics & Law
Workshop on the Financial Sustainability of Banks
  • Speaker: Professor Roger McCormick (London School of Economics)
  • Chair: Professor Emilios Avgouleas (University of Edinburgh
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited for CPD
About this talk
Are you an academic, legal/compliance practitioner or risk manager involved in understanding or managing environmental, social and governance risk within your organisation? The Financial Sustainability project, led by Prof Roger McCormick, is part of the LSE Law and Financial Markets Project. The Sustainable Finance Project's objectives are, first, to develop and, as far as possible, achieve international consensus on the following: a) the legitimate aspirations of market participants and others in relation to sustainability in the context of financial market activity; b) what is meant by "sustainable".
Wednesday 6 February 2013
UCL Legal & Social Philosophy Colloquium
Is dignity the foundation of human rights?
  • Speaker: Professor Jeremy Waldron Oxford University / NYU
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited for CPD

Professor Waldron is University Professor at New York University School of Law and teaches legal and political philosophy. He was previously University Professor in the School of Law at Columbia University. He holds his NYU position conjointly with his position as Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory at the University of Oxford (All Souls College). For 2011-2013, he is in New York in the Fall and in Oxford in the Spring

Download the discussion paper

Thursday 31 January 2013
The Social Networks Research Initiative, UCL Centre for Law, Economics and Society
Regulating Social Media: More Harm than Good?
  • Panellists: Ian Hogarth (Co-Founder and CEO, Songkick); Prof. Andrew Murray (London School of Economics); Tom Frederikse (Clintons LLP); Mark Adams (UK Director, The Audience); Martin Adams (SNRI @ CLES); Steven Braines (Artist Manager); and Ioannis Lianos (Director, UCL CLES)
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited for CPD hours
About this talk
The effect of the spread of social media has been dramatic - altering the power dynamic between consumers and providers of goods and services, disrupting traditional business models, undermining intellectual property rights, enabling cultural participation, and facilitating a more democratic flow of information. On January 31, 2013 UCL Laws will play host to a fascinating exchange between leading thinkers involved in the industry and policy surrounding social media.
Wednesday 30 January 2013
Centre for Ethics & Law
Lehman Brothers and the Lawyers: (When) Are Lawyers Ethically Responsible for Client Wrongs?
  • Speakers: Professor David Kershaw, LSE and Professor Richard Moorhead, UCL
  • Discussants: Professor Joan Loughrey, University of Leeds, and Chris Perrin, Clifford Chance LLP
  • Chair: Samantha Barass, Executive Director of Education and Training, Supervision, Authorisation, Risk and International Affairs, Solicitors' Regulation Authority
  • Accreditation: 1.5 CPD hour (SRA only)
About this talk
Should transactional lawyers bear responsibility when their competent actions facilitate unlawful activity by their client? Or is a lawyer's only concern to act in the client's interest by providing her with the advice and support she seeks? The high profile failure of Lehman Brothers provides a unique opportunity to explore these questions in the context of the provision of a legal opinion by a magic circle law firm.
Wednesday 30 January 2013
UCL Legal & Social Philosophy Colloquium
What's the point of blame?
  • Speaker: Professor Miranda Fricker, Sheffield University
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited for CPD
About this talk
The paper offered a distinctive vindication of blame by reference to the constructive interpersonal mechanism I call Communicative Blame. This kind of blame aims to inspire remorse in the wrongdoer. Blame and remorse are thereby revealed as having a transformative purpose, which consists in the fact that they work to bring the different parties' moral understanding into greater alignment, and so to create a greater alignment of moral reasons. In doing this, they function to continuously (re-)generate our shared moral life.
Tuesday 29 January 2013
UCL Centre for Law, Economics and Society
From Chaos to Cosmos: The Legal and Social Challenges to Promoting Innovation in Russia
  • Speaker: Alexey Ivanov, Director of Legal Policy and Social Development at the Shkolkovo Foundation (Russian Federation)
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited for CPD
About this talk
Russia is an innovative country in the sense that it is always in a process of change. During the last decade, the promotion of technological innovation has pushed its way into the very center of the Russian economic and political agenda. Indeed, Russia is currently trying to find its role in the new globalized world of hi-tech. However, as the political turmoil of the last year reveals, there is also a hunger for social innovation across diverse groups of Russian society.
Wednesday 23 January 2013
UCL Judicial Institute
Tomorrow's Lawyers: An Introduction to Your Future

  • Introduction: Professor Richard Susskind OBE
  • Panellists: The Rt. Hon. The Lord Bach, David Morley (Senior Partner, Allen & Overy), Rosemary Martin (General Counsel, Vodafone), and Richard Moorhead (Professor of Law and Professional Ethics, UCL Laws)
  • Chair: Professor Dame Hazel GEnn DBE QC (Dean of UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Accreditation:This event was not accredited for CPD
About this talk:
According to Richard Susskind, legal institutions and lawyers are poised to change more radically over the next two decades than they have over the last two centuries. This is a central theme of his latest book, Tomorrow's Lawyers, the essential introduction to the future of law for those who want to thrive in the rapidly changing legal landscape. The book is a definitive guide to the future – for young and aspiring lawyers, and for all who want to modernize our legal and justice systems. It navigates the new legal terrain and offers practical guidance for those who intend to build careers and businesses in law.

Wednesday 23 January 2013
UCL Legal & Social Philosophy Colloquium
The ambitions of 'Contract of Promise': Thirty Years On

  • Speaker: Professor Charles Fried, Harvard University
  • Accreditation:This event was not accredited for CPD
About this talk:
This paper (a) notes the striking congruence between contract as promise - the view defended in C . Fried, Contract as Promise - and the economic analysis of law; (b) seeks to explain that congruence as well as the divergence between the two accounts; and (c) considers the validity and the utility of seeking to impose a template of political morality on as multifarious and practical a subject as contract law.
Thursday 17 January 2013
Current Legal Problems Lecture
The Nature of Rationality Review

  • Speaker: Professor Paul Craig, University of Oxford
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD by the SRA
About this lecture
Debates concerning proportionality and rationality have brought into sharper focus the meaning of both concepts. It nonetheless remains the case that the very meaning of rationality within judicial review remains under-theorized and imperfectly understood, with the consequence that erroneous conclusions are drawn regarding issues central to the concept. This lecture seeks to sharpen our understanding of rationality review and to dispel some of the misunderstandings that surround the concept.
Monday 14 January 2013
Centre for Law, Economics and Society
Competition Law and Intellectual Property Rights: Whose balance of innovation and incentives?
About this lecture
This event will explore the tension between competition law and intellectual property law and will look at the different focuses on static versus dynamic efficiencies. It will explore the differences from the view points of the courts, IP authorities and competition authorities.

This page was last modified on 24 March, 2014