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Laws Events - Past Events 2009

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Wednesday 16 & Thursday 17 December 2009
John Austin 150th Anniversary Conference
John Austin and his Legacy

About this event

This two-day conference celebrate the 150th anniversary of the death UCL's first professor of Jurisprudence, John Austin. The conference brings together legal philosophers from the US, Canada, UK and Europe in a programme that celebrates his work. Speaker include: Brian Bix (Minnesota), Roger Cotterrell (QMUL), David Dyzenhaus (Toronto), Pavlos Eleftheriadis (Oxford), Andrew Halpin (Swansea), Matthew Kramer (Cambridge), George Letsas (UCL), Andrew Lewis (UCL), Michael freeman (UCL), Michael Lobban (QMUL), Patricia Mindus (Turin), Stanley Paulson (Washington), James Penner (UCL), Michael Rodney (London South Bank), Wilfrid Rumble (Vassar), Fred Schauer (Virginia), Philip Schofield (UCL), Nicos Stavropoulos (Oxford), Lars Vinx (Bilkent), Richard Tur (Oxford) and Emmanual Voyiakis (Brunel).


 
Friday 11 December 2009
London Labour Law Discussion Group
The Case for Social Rights
Dr Virginia Mantouvalou, University of Leicester

Read more about the London Labour Law Discussion Group
Thursday 10 December 2009
Current Legal Problems (CLP) Lecture
INAUGURAL LECTURE:
An untheory of the law of Trusts

Speaker: Professor James Penner, UCL Laws
Accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA and Bar Standards Board
Free of charge and open to the public

 
Thursday 10 December 2009
UCL Institute for Human Rights Lecture
IHR: Commitment to Human Rights
Chair:
Dr. Basak Cali
Speakers:
Mr. Osvaldo Marsico, Argentinian Charge d'Affaires, Argentinian Embassy
Ms. Meghna Abraham, Head of Social and Cultural Rights, Amnesty International
Ms. Alice Wyss, Researcher, Dept of Political Science
Respondent:
Dr. Saladin Meckled-Garcia, Director, UCL Institute for Human Rights

About this event:
Argentina is the country in the world that gives the most support to human rights, humanitarian law and international criminal law - in terms of commitment on paper at least. That's according to a research project to be unveiled by University College London to mark International Human Rights Day.

'Nominal Commitment to Human Rights: A Global Survey' is a student-staff research project that has studied which states have ratified which treaties - sketching out a global view of which countries are the most willing and less willing to support human rights internationally by way of making legal commitments. The study focussed on the core global human rights and humanitarian law treaties and treaties that aim to prevent and punish international crimes. This study was carried out by students on the MA in Human Rights at UCL's Department of Political Science under the guidance of researchers Alice Wyss and Dr Basak Cali.

The Survey recognises that nominal commitment does not necessarily mean real commitment. We, however, hope that this survey will spark an informed debate about the role of nominal commitment towards internalisation of human rights ideals by offering a comprehensive global ranking of countries.

To explain the importance of international legal commitment to human
rights, humanitarian law and punishment and prevention of international crimes to Argentina in particular and the world in general, UCL's Department of Political Science, in association with UCL's Institute of Human Rights, has invited the Argentinian Charge d'Affaires Mr. Osvaldo Marsico and Amnesty International's Head of Social and Cultural rights, Ms. Meghna Abraham, to discuss these results.

Wednesday 9 December 2009
UCL / International Law Association (British Branch) Lectures
Going Formal, Going Natural, or Going Political? (Re-)Situating the international between law and politics
Dr Florian Hoffmann (LSE)
Download the full 2009-10 UCL / ILA Lecture Series
Tuesday 8 December 2009
WTO Scholars' Forum
Are Doha and the Single Undertaking Trade Round Model Dead?
Stefan Amarasinha, European Commission
Michael Johnson, Independent Advisor on International Trade Policy and Former Co-ordinator of Trade Policy at the UK Department of Trade and Industry

Read more about the WTO Scholars' Forum
Tuesday 8 December 2009
UCL Lunch Hour Seminar Series
The right to obscene thoughts

Professor Stephen Guest, UCL Laws
About this lecture
This lecture discusses how genuine freedom must include all manner of thought, including the irrational, the bad, and the obscene, and how the recent new offence of possessing extreme pornography has breached this principle
Read more about the UCL Lunch Hour Lecture Series
Monday 7 December 2009
Centre for Law the Environment - Policy Seminars
Access to Environmental Justice

Debbie Tripley, CE, Environmental Law Foundation
Read more about the Centre for Law and the Environment

This seminar is kindly supported by Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer
Thursday 3 December 2009
Current Legal Problems
International Law and the Protection of Natural Resources in Situations of Armed Conflict
Phoebe Okowa, Queen Mary University of London
Accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA and Bar Standards Board
 
Thursday 3 December 2009
UK Constitutional Law Group
The Legitimacy of Constitutional Rights-based Judicial Review - for and against

Dr Aileen Kavanagh and Professor Richard Bellamy, UCL Department of Political Science
Find out about the UK Constitutional Law Group and how to become a member
Thursday 3 December 2009 - Friday 4 December 2009
UCL Institute for Human Rights
Drawings from Darfur
An exhibition of drawings by Darfurian and Chadian children, collected by London-based NGO Article 1, which describe attacks on their villages, and which have in 2007 been accepted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague as contextual evidence for war crimes committed.
Thursday 3 December 2009
Ius Commune / Institute for Global Law speaker series
Protection of the weaker party in European Contract Law - Standardised and Individual Inferiority in Multi-Level Private Law

Dr. Hannes Roesler, Senior Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute in Hamburg
Chair: Professor Hugh Collins, LSE
Accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA and Bar Standards Board


About this lecture
It is a permanent challenge to accomplish freedom of contract effectively and not just to provide its formal guarantee. Indeed, 19th century private law already included elements guaranteeing the protection of this "material" freedom of contract. However, consensus has been reached about the necessity for a private law system which also provides for real chances of self-determination. An example can be found in EC consumer law. Admittedly, the law is restrained - for reasons of legal certainty - by its personal and situational typicality and bound to formal prerequisites. However, the new rules against discrimination are dominated by approaches which strongly focus on the protection of the individual. It is supplemented by national provisions, which especially counterbalance individual weaknesses. The autonomy of national law can be explained by the different traditions with regard to "social" contract law in the Member States. The differences are especially apparent regarding public policy, good fair or breach of duty before or at the time of contracting (culpa in contrahendo). They form another argument against the undifferentiated saltation from partial to total harmonisation of contract law.
Wednesday 2 December 2009
UCL Jurisprudence Review
Is There a Right to Water in International Law?

Professor Malcolm Forster, Head of Public International Law Department, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer; Visiting Professor, UCL
Professor Iain Scobbie, Sir Joseph Hotung Research Professor in Law, Human Rights and Peace Building in the Middle East, SOAS
Dr Philippe Cullet, Reader in International Environmental Law, SOAS
Read more about the UCL Jurisprudence Review
Monday 30 November 2009
Centre for Law the Environment - Policy Seminars
Evolution and Future of the Carbon Market, Road to Copenhagen and Post 2012

Anthony Hobley, Partner, Norton Rose LLP
Read more about the Centre for Law and the Environment

This seminar is kindly supported by Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer
Thursday 26 November 2009
Current Legal Problems
Recalibrating ECHR: Rights and the Role of the Human Rights Act Post 9/11
Prof. Helen Fenwick, University of Durham
Accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA and Bar Standards Board
Free of charge and open to the public

 
Thursday 26 November 2009
UCL Centre for Commercial Law
Private Companies and Corporate Finance under Companies Act 2006: What lies ahead?

Panel of Experts:
Professor John Lowry, UCL
Peter Brien, Slaughter and May
Professor Dan Prentice, Oxford, UCL and Erskine Chambers
John Cone, Head of Erskine Chambers
Accredited with 2 CPD hours
About this event:
This seminar will focus on the effect of the Companies Act 2006 on private companies and whether there will be any impact on corporate finance activities. In particular, the Panel will discuss the abolition of the prohibition on private companies giving financial assistance for the acquisition of their own shares; the new procedure for reducing share capital of private companies; comparisons between the new capital reduction route and other existing mechanisms for reducing capital and to what extent these changes will facilitate corporate restructurings and enhance mergers and acquisitions.
Wednesday 25 November 2009
WTO Scholars' Forum
Beyond Mere Symbolism: An Anatomy of Symbolic Power in the World Trade Organization
Dr Matthew Eagleton-Pierce
University of Oxford, Departmental Lecturer in International Political Economy, Oxford Department of International Development
Read more about the WTO Scholars' Forum
Tuesday 24 November 2009
UCL Institute for Human Rights
Act to End Genocide
Dr James Smith of the Aegis Trust


Read more about the UCL Institute for Human Rights

James Smith will be speaking about the work of The Aegis Trust, a UK-based genocide prevention organisation, which he co-founded. Aegis undertakes research and policy advice with regard to genocide prevention. It runs genocide education programmes and provides support for survivors and communities where genocide has happened. Based at the UK Holocaust Centre, it is responsible for the Kigali Memorial Centre, Rwanda. One focus will be on Aegis 'Protect Darfur' campaign, and members of Aegis Students will also contribute their experience.

The lecture is accompanied by an exhibition of drawings by Darfurian and Chadian children, collected by London-based NGO Article 1, which describe attacks on their villages, and which have in 2007 been accepted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague as contextual evidence for war crimes committed.

Monday 23 November 2009
Centre for Law the Environment - Policy Seminars
European Community and Environmental Law - The Words and the Reality

Dr Ludwig Krämer, Lecturer, College of Europe (Bruges) and Visiting Professor, UCL

Read more about the Centre for Law and the Environment

This seminar is kindly supported by Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer
Thursday 19 November 2009
Current Legal Problems
Language, the WTO and International Agricultural Trade
Dr Fiona Smith, UCL Laws
Chaired by The Rt Hon The Lord Steyn
Accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA and Bar Standards Board

About this lecture
Scholars and practitioners argue that failures in international agricultural trade regulation in the World Trade Organisation arise because the existing rules are unable to prevent states from using trade measures which disrupt the natural flow of agricultural goods in and out of their domestic markets. According to their ideas, better rules are needed to re-establish the free market in agricultural products. This suggestion is based on assumptions about the role of language. That is, that language is like a tool box: all the words and sentence constructions are available at any time in the box and we only need to select what we need to fulfil a task. Seen in these terms, the problem of international agricultural trade is elf-evident, it is merely that we have selected the wrong language ‘tools’ from our proverbial tool box. In this lecture, I will suggest that this conception of language’s role in regulation is too limited. Instead I will sketch out a project which offers a more dynamic role for language. Specifically what language does and how it does it; whether it is possible, using language scholarship as a methodological approach, to determine where the boundary is between what can be said and what cannot be said by the agricultural trade community of scholars, negotiators and civil society representatives, and, how this might translate into the WTO rules on agriculture; how far the language used in the WTO Agreement on Agriculture (or any amendments) can be ‘stretched’ to accommodate multiple meanings and what those meanings might be. That is, can the precise range of meanings be predicted using language as the methodology? What it means to interpret a treaty and how this works in the context of international agricultural trade. Whilst the lecture focuses on international agricultural trade in the WTO, general comments on language have resonance for many other areas of international law.
Wednesday 18 November 2009
UCL / International Law Association (British Branch) - BOOK LAUNCH
Shipping Interdiction and the Law of the Sea:
Pirates, drugs, IUU fishing, migrant smuggling and terror
Dr Douglas Guilfoyle (UCL)
Discussant:
Professor Bill Gilmore (University of Edinburgh)
Professor Catherine Redgwell (UCL)
Accredited with 1 CPD hours by the SRA and Bar Standards Board
Download the full 2009-10 UCL / ILA Lecture Series

About this event:
The oceans are critical both to states’ interests and to human prosperity, being a highway for commerce, a shared resource and a vector for threats to security. While ninety per cent of legal international trade moves by sea, the oceans are also used by smugglers, irregular migrants and those trading in weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and associated materiel. The vast resource represented by world fish stocks is difficult to govern: illegal, unreported or unregulated fishing can threaten coastal state economies and human food security. Finally, vessels at sea are also vulnerable to violence: ships are attacked by robbers, pirates and hijackers with alarming frequency, raising concerns that such attacks could finance terrorism. The law of the sea addresses these problems through a variety of jurisdictional regimes aimed at suppressing unlawful or undesirable activities. This book examines interdiction at sea: the boarding, inspection and search of a ship at sea suspected of prohibited conduct and the consequences that may follow in national law and the law of State responsibility.
Monday 16 November 2009
Centre for Law the Environment - Policy Seminars
Environmental Policy and Environmental Politics: Does the Distinction Matter?

Tom Burke CBE, Co-Founder, E3G and Visiting Professor, UCL
Read more about the Centre for Law and the Environment

This seminar is kindly supported by Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer
Monday 16 November 2009
UK Constitutional Law Group
Domestic Apex Court Judges and the European Court of Human Rights: A Socio-Legal Analysis

Dr Basak Cali
Find out about the UK Constitutional Law Group and how to become a member
Wednesday 11 November 2009
UCL / International Law Association (British Branch) Lectures
Jurisdiction over Foreign Forces:
The Calipari Case and the Law of the Flag
Dr Aurel Sari (University of Exeter)
Download the full 2009-10 UCL / ILA Lecture Series

About this lecture:
In 2005, US armed forces shot Nicola Calipari, an Italian military intelligence officer, at a roadblock in Iraq . The Italian authorities subsequently charged the soldier responsible with murder and tried him in absentia. The significance of the Calipari case lies in the fact that it turned on the legal position of foreign armed forces under customary international law. As such, it represents one in only a handful of cases decided in recent decades which address the underlying principles of international law in this area.
Wednesday 11 November 2009
Institute of Brand and Innovation Law
The Future of Patent Litigation
The Rt Hon Lord Justice Jackson
The Hon. Mr Justice Arnold
Professor Adrian Zuckerman (Oxford)
Professor Lionel Bently (Cambridge) will take the chair
Read more about the Institute of Brand and Innovation Law
Monday 9 November 2009
Book Launch
The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable

The shocking secret memos used to justify brutal CIA torture tactics after 9/11
Professor Philippe Sands QC, UCL / Matrix Chambers


About this book
Since the ‘war on terror’ was launched in the wake of 9/11, individuals, including British citizens, suspected of posing a threat to western security, have been subjected to indefinite imprisonment and brutal treatment in overseas detention facilities, where all entreaties for justice are denied. Global outrage and furious questions about the collusion of international agencies such as MI5 followed, but all official reports have been kept firmly under wraps. Now, for the first time, secret memos issued by the US Department of Justice, revealing in graphic detail the barbaric interrogation techniques used on prisoners, have been compiled in one remarkable volume.

This collection gives readers an unfiltered look at the tactics approved for use in the secret prisons – including forcing detainees to stay awake for eleven days straight, slamming them against walls, stripping them naked, locking them in a small box with insects to manipulate their fears, and, of course, waterboarding – as well as the incredible arguments advanced to justify them.

Thursday 5 November 2009
Current Legal Problems
1948: History and International Law in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Dr Catriona Drew, SOAS
Accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA and Bar Standards Board

 
Tuesday 3 November 2009
UCL Institute of Brand and Innovation Law Student Seminars
Rights and wrongs: the impact of the European Union on IP law

Michael Silverleaf QC
Download the full series for the year

Tuesday 3 November 2009
UCL Lunch Hour Seminar Series
Why the courts are as important as hospitals to the nation’s health

Professor Dame Hazel Genn DBE, QC

This lecture will be available to view online shortly from:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl/lhlpub_autumn2009/07_031109

About this lecture
Professor Genn will focus on the critical ways in which courts support society and the economy and on how they have directly improved standards of medicine practice and health care. She will also discuss new evidence about the link between access to justice and health and consider whether much of what turns up in doctors’ surgeries (including requests for anti-depressants) are in fact the results of an inability to access the courts.
Read more about the UCL Lunch Hour Lecture Series
Monday 2 November 2009
Centre for Law the Environment - Policy Seminars
Laws from Nature: transforming environmental law

Carine Nadal, Legal Research Officer, The GAIA Foundation and
Ian Mason, Barrister and Director of the EJRC
Read more about the Centre for Law and the Environment

This seminar is kindly supported by Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer
Thursday 29 October 2009
Current Legal Problems
When it Comes to Contact Disputes, What are Family Courts For?
Felicity Kaganas, Brunel University
Accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA and Bar Standards Board
 
Thursday 29 October 2009
Centre for Commercial Law
Corporate and Financial Law Reading Group
Speakers: Dr Marc Moore (UCL), Kate Leivesley (UCL PhD) and Javier Tapia (UCL PhD)
This is a closed reading group. Please email Dr Arad Reisberg if you are interested in attending others in the year.
 
Wednesday 28 October 2009
UCL / International Law Association (British Branch) Lectures
From Greenwich Mean Time to Leap Seconds:
International Agreement on Uniform Regimes
Professor Richard Gardiner (UCL)
Accredited with 1 CPD hours by the SRA and Bar Standards Board
Download the full 2009-10 UCL / ILA Lecture Series
Tuesday 27 October 2009
UCL Centre for Criminal Law
LAUNCH: Risk and risk management in the criminal law

Keynote Address:

  • Professor Andrew Ashworth CBE QC DCL FBA, Vinerian Professor of English Law in the Universitry of Oxford

Panel discussion:

  • Professor Bob Sullivan, UCL (chair of panel)
  • The Rt Hon Sir Richard Buxton, former Lord Justice of Appeal,
  • Professor Jeremy Horder, Law Commission, and
  • Professor Nicola Lacey, Professor of Criminal Law, LSE.
Read more about the UCL Centre for Criminal Law
Monday 26 October 2009
Centre for Law and Governance in Europe 'Hot Topics' in European Law Lectures, with the Internation Law Association
WTO: The Appellate Body and its Hermeneutics:
How long will its "Infant's Disease" Last?

Professor Joseph Weiler, NYU School of Law
Accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA and Bar Standards Board

About this lecture:
The jurisprudence of the Appellate Body of the WTO has been characterized by a distinct hermeneutic. The AB likes to present its approach to interpretation as sternly faithful to Articles 31 and 32 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, with the implied premise that these Articles, endlessly and ritualitically cited, offer an objective and uncontested method of interpretation. Whether the AB as an Institution or its shifting Members, actually believe its hermeneutic rhetoric, is not clear. However, given the notorious open textured and indeterminant nature of the Articles, it is self evidnet, indeed an almost trivial observation, that it was the practice of interpretation of the Appellate Body (especially in its early years) which gave a particular meaning to these Articles rather than some essential meaing of the Articles shaping the practice of interpretation. The early hermeneutic understanding enters into a subsequent self-re-enforcing cycle. You give meaning to the rule of interpretation by the way you interpret and the rule, thus construed and reenforced will now shape the way your interpret. The distinctiveness of its hermeneutic has been evident in, for example, an ostensible literalism one manifestation of which has been a reliance on dictionary definitions to resolve interpretative conflicts to a degree vastly greaty than other international tribunals -- all of whom equally claim to be relying on Articles 31 and 32 of the VCLT. Likewise, the AB has its own way of construing "Object and Purpose."

In this lecture Professor Weiler will speculate on the motives of the AB in adopting this hermeneutic, analyze whether it actually explains outcomes or is a mere rhetorical dressing, evaluate whether it has served and continues to serve the interest of the system(s) (WTO; general international law), and assess the extent of possible change, actual and potential.

Read more about the work of the Centre for Law and Governance in Europe

Monday 26 October 2009
Centre for Law the Environment - Policy Seminars
Internship oppotunities: An opportunity to ask experts from key NGOs about internships in their organisations - what will I get out of an internship? When should I apply? How can I apply? How can I combine internships and academic work?

Camilee Adelle Institute of European Environmental Policy, Anna Karklina FIELD, Emma Montlake Environmental Law Foundation and Nic Vincett Capacity Global

Read more about the Centre for Law and the Environment

This seminar is kindly supported by Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer
Thursday 22 October 2009
Current Legal Problems
The interplay between international legal regimes: some current critical issues
Prof Vera Gowlland-Debbas, Honorary Professor of Public International Law, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies


This event is sponsored by
Blackstone Chambers

About this lecture
This lecture will explore the relationship between such fields as human rights/humanitarian law, peace and security/ human rights, as well as the legal system's underlying conflict/harmonization rules and the question of an international public policy.

Wednesday 21 October 2009
The Law & Ethics Centre
Inaugural Lecture to launch the Centre:
Regulation and the social meaning of risk
Professor Jonathan Woolf
Chaired by The Rt Hon The Lord Neuberger of Abbotsbury
About this event:
According to the sociologist Ulrich Beck we now live in a ‘risk society’: a society pre-occupied with hazards to life and heath. Risk is understood both in negative and positive terms: risk is both danger and innovation. From a moral point of view a central question is under what circumstances is it acceptable for individuals to be exposed to risks to which they have not consented? From an economic point of view a central question is how to encourage socially beneficially risk-taking while avoiding recklessness? In considering how one might frame regulation in order to reduce danger, but support innovation, it is helpful to frame the issues around an analysis set out by Helene Hermansson and Sven Ove Hansson. They distinguish three parties to risk: who benefits from the risky activity; upon whom is the risk imposed; and who decides whether the risky action takes place?  Appropriate regulation will need to be sensitive to the different cases, and also to John Adam’s argument that often individuals are happy to live with a particular level of risk in their lives, and so will change their behaviour in unexpected ways in response to a changing risk environment.


Read more about the UCL Law & Ethics Centre
Wednesday 21 October 2009
UCL / International Law Association (British Branch) Lectures
Legal Reasoning in International Investment Awards:
Transparency and Legitimacy Concerns
Dr Federico Ortino (King’s College London)
Chaired: Dr Alejandro Escobar (Baker Botts LLP/ UCL)
Download the full 2009-10 UCL / ILA Lecture Series

About this lecture
As international arbitral tribunals are called to adjudicate more and more disputes brought by foreign investors vis- à-vis host States involving very delicate economic, social and environmental policies, a growing number of scholars have raised concerns about the legitimacy of international investment arbitration. In order to contribute to this debate (as well as to the broader debate about the legitimacy of the emerging system of international investment law), the presentation focuses on the legal reasoning of investment treaty tribunals. The presentation starts with an overview of the current legitimacy debate particularly addressing investment arbitration and arguing that clarity in investment tribunals’ legal reasoning would strengthen the legitimacy of investment arbitration. It then examines the arbitration rules provided for by the major arbitration institutions as well as those found in international investment treaties with regard to the requirement for investment tribunals to provide reasons. The presentation, then, focuses on the following three types of egregious failures that may render investment tribunals’ legal reasoning unclear: (a) abuse of precedents, (b) lack of internal consistency and (c) excessive minimalism. The methodology of this section is case-law based and selective: the analysis will focus on a few
awards (CMS, Metalclad, Vivendi, Enron, LG&E, and Continental) dealing with a small selection of treaty provisions (expropriation and emergency exception). As part of strengthening their internal and external legitimacy,
the presentation argues that investment tribunals should, at a minimum, avoid incurring in these egregious failures. While these imperfections do not appear to constitute the norm (in fact closer to the exception), given the particular
context in which investment decisions takes place, investment tribunals should aim at perfection.

Friday 16 October 2009
UCL Centre for Commercial Law
Company Law, Corporate Governance and the Banking Crisis

Chaired by Professor Edward Walker-Arnott (Honorary Visiting Professor at UCL and former senior partner of Herbert Smith)

Speakers include:
Professor Philip Rawlings (Professor of the Law at UCL);
Professor John Lowry (Professor of the Law at UCL and Vice-Dean);
Dr. Arad Reisberg (Reader in Corporate and Financial Law and Vice Dean);
Dr Roger Barker (Head of Corporate Governance at the Institute of Directors);
Cliff Weight (co-founder of the executive pay consultancy Independent Remuneration Solutions, now part of MM&K);,
Dr Iris Chiu (Senior Lecturer in Laws at UCL);
Dr Marc Moore (Lecturer in laws at UCL).
About this event:
In this special afternoon seminar, scheduled to coincide with the culmination of the Walker Review’s second consultation period, experts from UCL Laws and special invited speakers will discuss the key corporate governance issues exposed by the banking crisis and advance proposals for future regulatory developments in this area. Issues which will be explored include:
  • the effectiveness of directors’ individual and collective duties as a constraint on irresponsible levels of risk-taking;
  • the role of performance remuneration design in both creating and mitigating incentives for excessive risk-taking;
  • the effectiveness of civil and administrative sanctions available in respect of breach of directors’ individual responsibilities;
  • how the principles of corporate governance bear on the discharge of collective responsibility; and
  • the main features of the banking collapses – as they appear from published material – which suggest a need for official investigation
Thursday 15 October 2009
UCL Institute of Human Rights Launch
Corporate Social Responsibility & Human Rights: Have Ten Years of Voluntarism Worked?

More information about the Institute of Human Rights
Thursday 15 October 2009
Current Legal Problems
Is it NICE? The Appeal and Limits of the Medical Model in Criminal Justice
Professor Ian Loader, University of Oxford
Chaired by The Rt Hon Lord Justice Moses


This lecture is sponsored by

Kingsley Napley

About this lecture
Against a backdrop of concerns about the 'politicization' of criminal justice, several proposals have recently been made for the establishment of a criminal justice equivalent to the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). Such as body would disseminate guidance on best practice in criminal justice and help fund programmes in the light of research demonstrating what works and doesn't work to reduce crime. This, the argument runs, would produce criminal justice policy and practice that is more evidence-based and less driven by political ideology and calculation. In this lecture, I examine the appeal of this proposal to extend a medical model of decision-making to the justice arena and consider what its emergence tells about the present relations between politics and criminal justice. I then consider the limits of such efforts to insulate criminal justice from political and popular pressure and render it more 'evidence-based'. In so doing, I use the case of NICE as a window though which to examine how we might best understand the interplay between expertise/public opinion, reason/emotion and knowledge/politics in the making of criminal justice policy.

Tuesday 13 & Wednesday 14 October 2009
Conference: Vertical Restraints in EC Competition Law: New Dynamics
One and a half day conference with a a full programme of speakers including:
Philip Lowe (DG, European Commission)
Philip Collins (Chairman, OFT)
Sir Christopher Bellamy (Linklaters LLP)
Judge Nicholas Forwood (European Court of First Instance) and others


About this conference
The reform of EC competition law on vertical restraints has marked the beginning of the process of transformation of EC competition law in the late 1990s, in particular because of the adoption of a more compatible to neoclassical economic theory approach. Almost ten years since the adoption of Regulation 2790/99 and the vertical restraints guidelines, the European Commission has initiated a revision process and has published some proposals at this respect. The aim of this conference would be (a) to understand the process of the reform of EC competition law on verticals, (b) to provide some useful comparative insights, by looking to the most recent developments in US antitrust law on verticals as well as the most recent competition law practice in some Member States’ and selected jurisdictions and (c) to critically assess the proposals of the European Commission, by confronting them to recent economic theory and to legal practice.

The event explored:

  • General aspects of the reform of Vertical Restraints
  • A retrospective and prospective of the vertical restraints reform
  • Internet distribution and vertical restraints
  • Tying/bundling
  • Resale Price Maintenance
  • Exclusive territories and parallel trade
  • Vertical restraints and the rise of retailer power: competition law and alternatives
  • Vertical restraints in national competition laws and international convergence
Tuesday 13 October 2009
WTO Scholars' Forum
WTO Law and Human Rights:
A relationship reconfigured through the lens of sustainable development
Dr Emily Reid, University of Southampton


Read more about the WTO Scholars' Forum

 


Friday 9 October 2009
What are Human Rights For?
The launch of the UCL Jurisprudence Review 2009 with:
Kimberle Crenshaw, professor at Columbia Law School and a prominent figure in critical legal studies;
David Kennedy, professor at Harvard Law School known for his criticism of international law;
Philippe Sands QC, professor at UCL Faculty of Laws and author of the internationally renowned Torture Team; and
William Twining, emeritus professor at UCL Faculty of Laws and a leading figure in British legal education.

For more information about the UCL Jurisprudence Review see:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/jurisprudence-review

About this event
UCL Jurisprudence Review hosted an international panel of pre-eminent scholars and lawyers to explore the limits of human rights law.
  • Does human rights express ideology of western liberalism?
  • Does it view social injustice too narrowly?
  • Whom does it benefit most and who is left out?
  • Has the human rights movement reached its potential?
Thursday 8 October 2009
Current Legal Problems
The Human Rights of Children
Professor Michael Freeman FBA, UCL
Chaired by The Rt Hon Lord Justice Thorpe
Accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA and Bar Standards Board

This event is sponsored by
Garden Court Chambers

About this lecture
The lecture will examine the case for children’s rights and discuss ways of improving the implementation of them including a discussion of the Equality Bill and a possible third protocol.

Grand Challenges for Human Wellbeing
UCL Grand Challenge for Human Wellbeing

Thursday 8 October 2009
The Annual Denys Holland Dinner

For more information contact Derek Hall on hall.d@btinternet.com
About this event
To remember and celebrate the life of Professor Denys Holland, in whose memory the Denys Holland Scholarship Fund was created, and is maintained, by donations from his students.  The Denys Holland Scholarship aims to support undergraduate students who would be unable to study at UCL without financial help, and who can demonstrate their intent to make full use of the activities offered by UCL and the Student Union.
Wednesday 7 October 2009
UCL / International Law Association (British Branch) Lectures
Insolvent States in International Law
Dr Michael Waibel (University of Cambridge)
Accredited with 1 CPD hours by the SRA and Bar Standards Board
Download the full 2009-10 UCL / ILA Lecture Series
AUTUMN TERM 2009
Tuesday 30 June 2009
UCL Bindman Annual Debate
To be or not to be: A decision for the individual or the State?
The Debate Panel includes:
  • Marcel Berlins, Journalist and Broadcaster
  • Saimo Chahal, Partner, Bindmans and Solicitor to Debbie Purdy
  • Dr Rob George, Care not Killing
  • Edward Turner, director of Dignity in Dying
  • Katherine Araniello, artist and disability rights campaigner
  • Sir Ken Macdonald, former Director of Public Prosecutions
  • Dr Evan Harris MP
 
Monday 29 June 2009
Annual Mishcon Lecture
Common Values, Common Sense:  
The story of rights and freedoms in modern Britain

Shami Chakrabarti, Director of Liberty
The chair will be taken by The Rt Hon The Baroness Hale of Richmond


 
Monday 22 June 2009
Hamlyn Seminar
Judging Civil Justice - Issues from the Hamlyn Lectures 2008
given by Professor Dame Hazel Genn
, Dean of Laws and Professor of Socio-Legal Studies, UCL Faculty of Laws

Commentators include:
Tony Allen, Director of CEDR
Professor Richard Moorhead, Cardiff Law School
Professor Judith Resnik, Yale Law School
The Rt Hon The Lord Woolf of Barnes
Emeritus Professor Michael Zander QC, LSE

Chaired by
The Rt Hon Lord Justice Sedley (Hamlyn Trustee)

 
Wednesday 17 June 2009
London Shipping Law Centre
Arbitration and Third Parties

See LSLC website:
http://www.london-shipping-law.com
 
Tuesday 16 June 2009
Institute of Brand and Innovation Law:
The Inaugural Sir Hugh Laddie Lecture
The Function of a Trade Mark: Hugh Laddie and the European Court of Justice
The Rt Hon Lord Hoffmann
Chaired by The Rt Hon the Lord Neuberger of Abbotsbury
This lecture was filmed and will be available on itunes.ucl.ac.uk soon

Friday 12 June 2009
In association with King’s Centre for Risk Management, King’s College London, UCL Laws’ Carbon Capture Legal Programme will host a conference on
Carbon Capture and Storage: Public Perception and Law
.

For more information about this event please contact carrie.bradshaw@ucl.ac.uk

Read more about the Carbon Capture Legal Programme

About this event:
Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is increasingly being recognised as an important climate change mitigation technology, and in recent months a number of jurisdictions have taken steps to put in place the necessary legal and regulatory frameworks to encourage and ensure the safe deployment of CCS. 

This conference seeks to address the issue of CCS and ‘the public’.  The conference is an inter-disciplinary endeavour, bringing leading risk communication experts together with lawyers working in the field of CCS to consider the role of both disciplines in the deployment of CCS technology internationally.  The conference sessions will seek to consider risk communication literature, together with the relevance of other controversial technologies such as GMOs and nuclear, providing a framework for analysis of the role of law in ensuring responsible risk communication and public engagement with CCS.

Wednesday 3 June 2009
Jevons Institute for Competition Law and Economics Fourth Annual Colloquium on Antitrust and Regulation
The Role of Behavioural Economics in Consumer Protection and Competition Law
Speakers include:
  • Professor David Evans, UCL / Jevons
  • Professor Mark Armstrong, UCL (Economics)
  • Miguel de la Mano, Deputy Chief Economist, DG Comp, European Commission
  • Amelia Fletcher, Chief Economist, Office of Fair Trading
  • Representative from the UK Competition Commission
  • Eliana Garces-Tolon, Member of Commissioner Cabinet, DG Sanco, European Commission
  • Representative from the US Federal Trade Commission
  • Judge Douglas Ginsburg, US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
  • Vivien Rose, Chairman of the Competition Appeal Tribunal

 

Read more about the UCL Jevons Institute

About this event:
Economists have long assumed that people are rational. Such people know what they want and make decisions to maximize the utility from those preferences. A new body of research from economists and psychologists investigates how people actually behave and questions the rationality hypothesis. This new field—known as “behavioural economics”—increasingly spills over into the realm of policy. If people make the wrong decisions because of in effect faulty wiring would they benefit from having the government fix this? That could come in the form of consumer protection policies such as giving people a reprieve from impulsive decisions to other policies such as requiring people to opt-out of certain decisions rather than opting in. There are antitrust implications as well since in principle firms could use our faulty wiring to increase their market power. This new field does not come without controversy. Some question whether the results are exaggerated, whether such policies may unduly disadvantage consumers who are able to defend themselves in the market, and whether a theory in which consumer welfare is ill-defined can provide a good way to develop economic models or devise policy interventions. The Colloquium will delve into this new field, its implications, and its controversies.

Monday 1 June 2009
Constitutional Law Group
Standards in Public Life
Sir Philip Mawer (Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards 2004-2007, now the Prime Minister's Adviser on Members' Interests)
Rita Donaghy (former member of the Committee on Standards in Public Life)
Professor Patricia Leopold (Reading University, and the leading academic lawyer writing on parliamentary privilege and standards in public life)
This seminar will be conducted on the basis of the Chatham House Rule.
Read more about the Constitutional Law Group
Friday 29 May 2009
Centre for Law and Governance in Europe / Centre for Law and Economics:
Competition Authorities' roundtable
The Reform of Competition Authorities and the 'Modernization' of Antitrust
Chaired by Frederic Jenny (Judge, Cour de Cassation, France; member of the Board, Office of Fair Trading; President, Competition Committee, OECD; Visiting professor, UCL)
Speakers include:
Philip Collins (Chairman, Office of Fair Trading, UK),
William Kovacic (Commissioner, Federal Trade Commission, US),
Bruno Lasserre (Chairman, Autorité de la concurrence, France),
Abel Mateus (Professor, University of Lisbon, former president of the Portuguese competition authority)
Carles Esteva Mosso (Director of Policy and Strategy, DG Competition, European Commission)
Contact: lisa.penfold@ucl.ac.uk
About this event:
The roundtable will examine the following topics:
Thursday 28 May 2009
CPD Lecture
Copyright's Cross-Currents
Professor David Lametti, Centre Intellectual Property Policy, McGill University
Accredited with 1 CPD hour (SRA and BSB)
Free of Charge
About this seminar
It is now trite to say that copyright doctrines have been altered, if not assaulted, by changing technologies. It is also true that a great deal has now been written on the theory of copyright: various doctrinal texts have treated the theoretical and conceptual bases of copyright, while others have applied them.

Less attention has been paid to the evolution of the fundamental underlying bases of copyright. In my view there are concurrent and conflicting shifts in the appreciation of copyright at the level of current popular and copyright discourse. These shifts are indicative of conflicting underlying conceptions which are at a critical juncture, both in the Canadian context and globally. The understanding that we have of this subtle shift, and the weight and direction we give to concurrent and often competing justificatory arguments will influence the outcome of various copyright debates, particularly those on copyright reform and the impact of current technologies on copyright.

This lecture sets out to understand and clarify these changes, and their implications current copyright issues.

Tuesday 26 May 2009
London Shipping Law Centre
Rome I and II – attempts to harmonise EU law of contract and tort
Chair: Richard Lord QC - Brick Court Chambers
Speakers:
Fergus Randolph – Brick Court Chambers
Professor Jonathan Harris – Birmingham University
Richard Gwynn – Stephenson Harwood
See LSLC website:
http://www.london-shipping-law.com
 
Thursday 21 May 2009
WTO Scholars' Forum
Science, Hermeneutics and International Economic Law:
Rethinking the 'Hormones' Dispute
Professor Sunjoon Cho, Chicago-Kent College of Law
Venue: UCL Laws
Time: 5.30-7pm
This event is free of charge

About this lecture
Science has recently become increasingly salient in various fields of international law. For example, under the WTO SPS Agreement a state must provide scientific justification for its food safety measures. Paradoxically, however, this ostensibly objective reference to science tends to complicate treaty interpretation, taking it beyond conventional application of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties. The two decades old trans-Atlantic trade dispute over hormone-treated beef is a case in point. This article demonstrates that beneath the controversy between the European Union and the United States on the safety of hormone-treated beef lies a critical hermeneutical divergence on the relevant science, which international adjudication may not fully capture and address. It is a philosophical retelling of what has been regarded largely as a regulatory-legal controversy. While the United States perceives science as dogma-breaking, universal enlightenment, the EU views it a factor in its own (contextual) life-world ('Lebenswelt').
Thursday 21 May 2009
Current Legal Problems (CLP) Lecture
Abstraction and Equality

Speaker: Professor William Lucy, School of Law, University of Manchester
About this lecture
This lecture tackles two principal issues: the nature of law’s judgement and what, if anything, might be said in its favour. As to the first issue, the essay reminds lawyers of the obvious, namely, that law’s judgement is abstract, elucidating both what this entails and why it may be thought problematic. The main burden of the essay is to consider what might be said in favour of law’s abstract judgement. Only one family of arguments, part of a wider but still not all-encompassing class, are considered here: arguments from equality. Two different arguments from equality are examined, the conclusion being that each argument can provide some, albeit qualified support for law’s abstract judgement. Whether these different sources of support can be combined in a coherent normative package is also examined, as are some of the challenges in the task of justifying and explaining aspects of legal institutional design. These challenges might, it is suggested, warrant a rather different approach to legal philosophy than is often adopted.      
Wednesday 14 May 2009
London Shipping Law Centre
Special Event - Shipping & Energy
See LSLC website:
http://www.london-shipping-law.com
 

Thursday 7 May 2009
COMPETITION LAW IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT
Convenor: Dr. Ioannis Lianos
Economic expertise in a generalist court: the experience of a economist/judge in a civil law jurisdiction

Judge Frederic Jenny

Download the slides from this lecture (7 May 09)

Download the slides from the previous lecture (5 March 09) by Judge Jenny on Economic expertise in courts: best practices




About this lecture
Drawing on his experience as the first economist generalist judge at the French Supreme Court (Cour de Cassation), Judge Frederic Jenny will explore the following topics: if and how economic reasoning has been integrated in the Cour de cassation's judgments, since he has been appointed ? Did economic analysis make a difference in any cases? Would it help in the acse of generalist judges to have court-appointed experts, or assessors or judges that have an economics background ? What would be the best method to integrate economic reasoning, taking into account the way the Cour de cassation and other generalist judges work and decide cases?

Accredited with 2CPD hours by the Solicitors Regulatory Authority


Tuesday 5 May 2009
WTO SCHOLARS' FORUM
Services rules and services statistics: connections between governing and knowing, and why they matter
Dr Andrew Lang, LSE


Read more about the WTO Scholars' Forum at UCL

About this lecture
This paper explores the idea that legal regimes not only regulate behaviour within their domain of operation, but also help to shape the way we think about - imagine, interpret - the world the social domains on which they act. The aim of the paper is to explore the relationship between law and the production of 'knowledge' empirically, by looking in detail at one case study, namely the international legal regime governing international trade in services, and specifically, the World Trade Organisation's General Agreement on Trade in Services. Over the last fifteen years, this new body of international law has evolved alongside a corresponding body of social scientific expertise on the nature and dynamics of the global services economy. The paper tells a story of the co-evolution of these two systems, and tries to trace in detail the ways in which law and legal processes have been present in processes of knowledge production, shaping the way the global services economy is collectively imagined and its dynamics understood. It argues that we should see bodies of rules/norms and bodies of expertise as two connected parts of a larger system of governance: the knowledge which services experts produce help to make the global services economy amenable to regulation by law, while the forms of rationality which their expertise generates help to shape the behaviour of governmental actors even before those actors are confronted by international legal constraints.

Wednesday 29 April 2009
London Shipping Law Centre
Unsafe Ports and Berth Obligations
http://www.london-shipping-law.com
 
Monday 27 April 2009
Constitutional Law Group
The Protection of Human Rights in the Course of the Legislative Process
Gisjbert ter Kuile (Research student, UCL)
Discussant: Professor Francesca Klug, LSE
Chair: Professor David Feldman, University of Cambridge
Open to Members of the Constitutional Law Group

About this event
This presentation will include new information about the parts played by civil servants, parliamentary counsel, the Attorney General's Office and the staff of the Joint Committee on Human Rights and the importance of accountability and attitude in the legislative process.

Become a member of the Constitutional Law Group - £15
Thursday 26 March 2009
Current Legal Problems (CLP) Lecture
Lost in Translation? Towards a theory of economic transplants

Speaker: Dr Ioannis Lianos, UCL Laws
Chair: Professor Valentine Korah

About this lecture
"An Indian born economist once explained his personal theory of reincarnation to his graduate economic class: ‘if you are a good economist, a virtuous economist’ he said 'you are reborn as a physicist. But if you are an evil, wicked economist, you are reborn as a sociologist” (Paul Krugman, Peddling Prosperity: Economic Sense and Nonsense in the Age of Diminished Expectations, 1994). Jokes about economists abound lately. It is well known that political satire aims the great and the powerful; and economists have become powerful and great in the world of competition law. The rise of economics as one of the main (some will advance the most important) “source” of competition law discourse is well documented. This lecture will focus on a facet of the integration of economic analysis in competition law: "economic transplants". The term “economic transplants” refers to specific economic concepts that were incorporated into the legal discourse by an act of “translation”. They represent the ultimate degree of interaction between the legal and the economic systems. Using a paradigmatic approach the lecture will examine their specific characteristics and what distinguishes them from other forms of integration of economic analysis in competition law. It will then critically assess their role and their impact on the legal and the economic discourses

Tuesday 24 March 2009
Current Legal Problems (CLP) Lecture
US and UK Responses to Terrorism

Speaker: Professor David Cole (Georgetown Law School)
Chair: Professor Philippe Sands QC, UCL
Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
Download the full lecture series
Monday 23 March 2009
CPD Lecture
The Proposed Hong Kong Competition Regime
Speaker: Hans Mahncke, City University Hong Kong
Accredited with 1.5 CPD hours by the Solicitors Regulatory Authority

About this lecture
This lecture will explore the state of competition in the Hong Kong economy, outline the competition law provisions currently in force, evaluate the need for a generic competition law, introduce government proposals for a new competition law regime, assess the efficacy of the proposed generic competition law in tackling Hong Kong’s competition ills, if and where they exist, and seek the perspectives of participants on both the desirability and shape of competition law regimes for small, open economies.
Friday 20 March 2009
LONDON LEGAL HISTORY GROUP
"Justinian and his two codes: revisiting P. Oxy. 1814".
Dr Simon Corcoran (History, UCL)
 
Thursday 19 March 2009
INAUGURAL LECTURE
Beyond safety? The broadening scope of risk regulation

Speaker: Professor Maria Lee, UCL Laws
Chair: Professor Joanne Scott, UCL Laws
Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority

About this lecture
Using examples from the fields of nuclear energy, nanotechnology and genetically modified organisms, this lecture will explore the enormous challenge of regulating new or unsettled technologies, at national, EU and WTO level.

The regulatory framework in areas of high technological and scientific complexity is generally dominated by concerns about human health and the environment. It is however now very widely accepted in academic and policy debate that risk regulation is about much more than this. Even mainstream frameworks for and discussions of risk regulation routinely accept that in principle the social and ethical aspects of technologies and their regulation are significant considerations and should not be ignored.

This recognition of the complexity of risk regulation is now commonplace. The rhetorical expansion of the scope of risk regulation is, however, not always apparent in regulatory decision making. Overwhelming legal and political pressures mean that decisions are generally still explained and justified according to expert judgments of ‘safety’. This lecture will examine the mismatch between rhetoric and practice at national, EU and WTO level. The mismatch reflects a real ambivalence about the scale of the change implied by a broadening of risk regulation, and has significant practical and normative implications for scholars and practitioners of law and regulation.

Wednesday 18 March 2009
International Law Association British Branch / UCL International Law Seminars
Wartime Destruction and Plunder of Cultural Property: Issues of State Responsibility
Dr Roger O’Keefe, University of Cambridge
Chair: Sir Franklin Berman, Essex Court Chambers and Oxford University
Venue: MLT, UCL Laws
Time: 6pm
Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
No reservation required. Public Lecture
Download the full lecture series
Wednesday 18 March 2009
London Shipping Law Centre
Funding Litigation
See LSLC website:
http://www.london-shipping-law.com
Wednesday 18 March 2009
Bentham Association - UCL Laws Alumni Group
Bentham Presidential Address & Dinner:
“Better that a horse should have a voice in that House [of Lords], than that a judge should” (Jeremy Bentham).
Replacing the Law Lords by a Supreme Court.

by Lord Pannick QC
LISTEN AGAIN TO THIS LECTURE

Monday 16 March 2009
Centre for Law and Governance in Europe:
HOT TOPICS IN EUROPEAN LAW LECTURES
The future relationship between the two European Courts
Tobias Lock, UCL Laws
Accredited with 1 CPD hour

Download the Slides from this lecture


About this lecture
The present relationship between the European Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights is one of comity and mutual respect as can be seen by frequent mutual references and the Bosphorus case-law. The topic of the talk will be whether that relationship is going to change once the the Treaty of Lisbon, and with it EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, has entered into force. Art. 52 (3) of the Charter prescribes that the ECHR must be the minimum standard of human rights in the EU. One can therefore wonder whether this article entails a reference to the ECtHR's case-law, in effect making it binding on the ECJ. Another question is whether the planned accession of the EU to the ECHR will lead to jurisdictional conflicts between the two courts in inter-state cases and whether the ECtHR is likely to continue its Bosphorus case-law.
Thursday 5 March 2009
Current Legal Problems (CLP) Lecture
European Tort Law: A primer for the Common Lawyer

Speaker: Ken Oliphant, School of Law, University of Bristol
Chair: tbc
Venue: UCL Laws, Main Lecture Theatre
Time: 6-7pm
Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
No reservation required. Public Lecture
Download the full lecture series
Thursday 5 March 2009
Competition Law in a Global Context Lecture
Economic expertise in courts: best practices
Judge Frederic Jenny (UCL & Supreme Court of France (Cour de Cassation))
Accreditation: 1.5 CPD hours by the Solicitors Regulation Authority

About this lecture
The OECD has published a best practices report on the topic of presenting complex economic theories to judges. Judge Frederic Jenny will discuss the recommendations of the report as well as present different options in addressing the difficulty of the assessment of complex economic evidence in litigation.

DOWNLOAD THE SLIDES FOR THIS LECTURE
Wednesday 4 March 2009
Colloquium in Legal and Social Philosophy
A Defence of Categorical Reasons
Speaker: Russ Shafer-Landau (Wisconsin-Madison)
Enquiries may be directed to Dr George Letsas at g.letsas@ucl.ac.uk
Download the paper for this lecture
Wednesday 4 March 2009
UCL Institute of Bankruptcy, Restructuring and Insolvency Law& European High Yeald Association
Restructing Procedure Reform - Timely change for Britain's economy
 
Tuesday 3 March 2009
London Shipping Law Centre
The pressing risk of piracy: Addressing the consequences
See LSLC website:
http://www.london-shipping-law.com
Monday 2 - 31 March 2009
CPD Course
Competition, IP and Contractual Issues in the Media Industry: Law and Practice
Andrea Appella, OFT Director of International and Senior Research Fellow, UCL.
Accredited with 16 CPD hours.
About this course
The media industry is fast-moving and undergoing a process of development during the digital age. The objective of this course is to introduce the key features of the media industry and the significant issues arising from the application of competition and IP laws, as well as explaining the typical contractual structures in the industry.


Thursday 26 February 2009
Current Legal Problems (CLP) Lecture
"Fair play to all sides of the truth": controlling media distortions

Speaker: Professor Thomas Gibbons, School of Law, University of Manchester
Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
About this lecture
Considerable value is attached to the integrity of news gathering and reporting. Much weight is placed on the quality of editorial supervision but there exist a range of legal and regulatory measures to promote fairness, impartiality and responsible journalism more generally. Appropriate policies, and the means to implement them, have been the subject of recent reviews by the BBC, Ofcom and the House of Lords Communications Committee. The lecture examines the issues in the light of theories of freedom of expression, exploring in particular the problems associated with the telling of stories about complex truths.
Download the full lecture series
Wednesday 25 February 2009
International Law Association British Branch / UCL International Law Seminars
Suspending States from International Organizations for Violations of Human Rights and Democracy
Alison Duxbury, Melbourne University
Chair: Professor Dan Sarooshi, Oxford University
Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
Download the full lecture series
Wednesday 25 February 2009
Colloquium in Legal and Social Philosophy
Taking Rights out of Human Rights
Speaker: John Tasioulas (Oxford)
Enquiries may be directed to Dr George Letsas at g.letsas@ucl.ac.uk
Download the paper for this talk

View information on the Colloquium
Monday 23 February 2009
Centre for Commercial Law
The Credit Crisis
John Armour, Lovells Professor of Law and Finance, University of Oxford
Accreditation: 2 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
See map of the lecture theatre
Wednesday 11 February 2009
Institute of Brand and Innovation Law
Trade Mark Infringement without Confusion
Professor J. Thomas McCarthy, Founding Director, McCarthy Institute of Intellectual Property, University of San Francisco, USA
Professor Charle Gielen, NautaDutilh, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Professor David Llewellyn, White & Case, and King's College London, UK
Accreditation: 2 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
Wednesday 11 February 2009
London Shipping Law Centre
Damages Update
Venue: Offices of Quadrant Chambers
 
Wednesday 11 February 2009
International Law Association British Branch / UCL International Law Seminars
Trust Funds in International Law
Professor Ilias Bantekas, Brunel University
Chair: Professor Mary Footer, University of Nottingham
Download the full lecture series
Wednesday 11 February 2009
Colloquium in Legal and Social Philosophy
Hobess's Republican Legal Theory

Speaker: David Dyzenhaus (Toronto)
Download the paper for this lecture

View information on the Colloquium
Tuesday 10 February 2009
Centre for Commercial Law
European law and policy in Corporate Finance
Professor Eilis Ferran Professor of Company and Securities Law, Law Faculty, University of Cambridge
 
Monday 9 February 2009
London Shipping Law Centre
Security for and Enforcement of Claims
Venue: Offices of Holman FEnwick & Willan
 
Monday 9 February 2009
UCL Student Human Rights Programme
Legal vs Political Protection of Human Rights Panel
Professor Richard Bellamy, School of Public Policy, UCL
Dr Saladin Meckled-García, School of Public Policy, UCL
Colm O’Cinneide, UCL Laws
Tom Hickman, Blackstones Chambers
See more information on events organised by the UCL Student Human Rights Programme
Wednesday 4 February 2009
Colloquium in Legal and Social Philosophy
Underivative Duty: Prichard on Moral Obligation
Speaker:Tom Hurka (Toronto)
Enquiries may be directed to Dr George Letsas at g.letsas@ucl.ac.uk
 
Thursday 29 January 2009
Current Legal Problems (CLP) Lecture
Gauging the Cumbersomeness of EU Law

Speaker: Professor Damian Chalmers, School of Law, LSE
Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
A problem for EU law is that the ideals by which it seeks to legitimate itself are also those which enable the 90,000 pages of legislation that are the source of perceptions of it as domineeringly intrusive. To develop a more nuanced agenda for EU citizens also carries a high risk of generating further grounds for grievance. The root of this lies in a too thinly sketched relationship being drawn between the goals of EU law and the qualities of legal responsibility imposed on its subjects. If the former -be it combating climate change, securing constitutionalism or realising the single market - dominate the horizons of policy-makers, it is the latter that govern the practice of EU law’s subjects. Through three recent proposals– those on carbon dioxide capture, patients’ rights and provision of food information to consumers – the lecture will consider whether there is any underlying vision of how an EU subject should behave. It will suggest that, increasingly, EU law is about providing individuals with both the entitlement and the responsibility to make the most and best of themselves – be it eating well, making the most of one’s resources or getting the best care for one’s body. To ask this, however, demands much, arguably too much, of most legal subjects and most economic and administrative structures.

Download the full lecture series
Wednesday 28 January 2009
International Law Association British Branch / UCL International Law Seminars
Power-Sharing, Armed Groups and Contemporary Peace Negotiations
Professor Chandra Sriram, University of East London
Chair: Dr Phoebe Okowa, Queen Mary, University of London
Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
Download the full lecture series
Wednesday 28 January 2009
Colloquium in Legal and Social Philosophy
Justice and Social Choice
Speaker: Amartya Sen (Harvard)
Enquiries may be directed to Dr George Letsas at g.letsas@ucl.ac.uk

 

Download the paper for this talk

 

Thursday 22 January 2009
Current Legal Problems (CLP) Lecture
Do we need Criminal Complicity

Speaker: Professor Bob Sullivan, UCL Laws
Chair: tbc
Venue: UCL Laws, Main Lecture Theatre
Time: 6-7pm
Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
No reservation required. Public Lecture
About this lecture
In all developed systems of criminal law liability for crimes is not confined to the perpetrator of the conduct element of the offence. There are long established doctrines of complicity which, typically, place the accomplice in the same legal category as the perpetrator in terms of liability and the potential range of punishment. In Anglophone criminal law, the law relating to complicity is prolix and complex, leading to frequent appeals on points of law. In terms of fair labelling and desert, the law of complicity is frequently too inclusive and overly punitive. Current proposals for the reform of the English and Welsh law of complicity seem unlikely to improve this situation for that jurisdiction. A proposal for dispensing with complicity will be presented. It will be argued that the territory of doing and sharing criminal wrongs is better mapped without resort to complicity.
Download the full lecture series
Wednesday 21 January 2009
Institute of Brand and Innovation Law
Patent practices in the pharmaceutical sector – the aftermath of the European Commission’s report
On 28th November 2008, the European Commission announced its preliminary report focusing on patent practices in the pharmaceutical sector. The lauch of the controversial report was attended by, amongst others, the leading English Court of Appeal judge, Rt. Hon Lord Justice Jacob, whose speech can be viewed here.

Programme:
Chair: The Hon Mr Justice Barling, President, Competition Appeal Tribunal.

The Innovation Process and Patenting
Paul Dennerly, AstraZeneca

Regulatory Considerations
Ann Nielson, Bristol-Myers Squibb

The Generic Industry Perspective
Howard Roseberg, Frommer, Lawrence and Haug LLP

Litigating and the Commission's Methodology
David Rosenberg, GSK

Competition Law Issues
John Kallaugher, UCL and Latham & Watkins LLP
DOWNLOAD SLIDES

This programme was developed in co-operation with the Rt. Hon. Sir Robin Jacob.

Click here to join the Institute of Brand and Innovation Law (IBIL) mailing list

Listen again to this lecture

Wednesday 21 January 2009
Colloquium in Legal and Social Philosophy
Regulation Through Observation: The Curious Incident of the Camera in the Kitchen
Speaker: Edna Ullmann-Margalit (Hebrew University)
Time: 4 -7pm
Venue: Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, Wilkins Building, Gower Street, London WC1E
Enquiries may be directed to Dr George Letsas at g.letsas@ucl.ac.uk
Download the paper for this talk
Thursday 15 January 2009
Current Legal Problems (CLP) Lecture
Litigating in the Shadow of the Bargain: The internal market and social welfare

Speaker: Professor Tamara Hervey, School of Law, University of Sheffield
Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the Solicitors Regulation Authority
About this lecture
The relationship between EU internal market law and social welfare is both an enduring and current legal problem. Individual enforcement through the courts of the entitlements of internal market law may destabilize collective national welfare settlements. Solutions used at national level to this type of problem are often not available at EU level, in part because the EU does not enjoy competence to adopt harmonising legislation in many social welfare fields. One response to this at EU level has been through the use of informal settlements, ‘bargaining’, or, to use the more recent analytical framework, ‘new governance’ structures. The received wisdom is that the problem with informal settlements, be they ‘bargains’, or other ‘new governance’ solutions, is that they are not ‘litigation robust’. But is this so? If we agree – as we must – that such informal settlements are not robust technically legally speaking, are they very likely to be more robust than we might think in practice? Using Erlanger’s concept of ‘litigating in the shadow of the bargain’, this paper considers whether bargains in fact are reflected in the reasoning of the European Court of Justice when it resolves litigation concerning the relationship between EU internal market law and social welfare.
Download the full lecture series
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