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UCL Laws Events & CPD

Laws Events - Past Events 2014

Past Events
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Tuesday 8 April 2014
Centre for Ethics & Law
Banning Referral Fees - One Year On: Is the personal injury field now more ethical?
  • Speakers: John Spencer, Spencers Solicitors, Member of the Civil Justice Council, APIL; Stephen Mayson, Consultant, leading commentator on the legal profession; Andrew Hopper QC, leading authority on professional regulation; Other speakers to be confirmed
  • Chair: Professor Richard Moorhead (Director CELS, UCL Laws)
  • Accreditation: This event was accredited for 1 CPD hour with the SRA & BSB
About this event
The banning of referral fees was one of the less controversial elements of the Jackson proposal but it nevertheless split the professions and their regulators. Some defended them as essential or sensible elements of business; cheaper and more effective than other forms of marketing. Insurers were criticized for deriding the claimant personal injury market whilst generating income streams from referral fees themselves. The Bar, in particular, compared referral fees to bribes. The professional regulators varied in the extent to which they welcomed or tolerated the referral fee ban. Doubts about enforceability have routinely been expressed.

Tuesday 8 April 2014
UCL Global Disability Research Group
Giving Disability Rights Legal Force
  • Speaker: Colm O'Cinneide (UCL)
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited for CPD

About the speaker
Colm O’Cinneide is a Reader in Human Rights Law at University College London (UCL). He has published extensively in the field of constitutional, human rights and anti-discrimination law, and is currently General Rapporteur of the European Committee on Social Rights, having previously served as Vice-President of the Committee from 2009 to 2013. He has also acted as specialist legal adviser to the Joint Committee on Human Rights of the UK Parliament, as UK rapporteur for the European Commission’s network of independent legal experts on anti-discrimination law, and as an expert consultant for the International Labour Organisation, the UK Equality and Human Rights Commission, the Council of Europe and a range of other national and international human rights bodies.
Monday 7 April 2014
UCL Centre for Criminal Law
Juror Misconduct
  • Speakers: Professor David Ormerod QC (Queen Mary University of London and Law Commissioner) and Professor Cheryl Thomas, (University College London and Director, UCL Jury Project)
  • Chair: Professor Ian Dennis (UCL Centre for Criminal Law)
  • Accreditation: This event was accredited with 1.5CPD hours by the SRA & BSB

About this event
This lecture will discuss the issues for criminal justice presented by misconduct on the part of jurors. The primary focus will be on the proposed new offences in the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill relating to research by jurors on cases they are trying and other misconduct. The provisions in the Bill follow the recommendations of the Law Commission in their report, Contempt of Court (1): Juror Misconduct and Internet Publications (LC 340, December 2013). Professor Ormerod is head of the criminal law team at the Law Commission and Professor Thomas has carried out ground-breaking research on juries for the Ministry of Justice.

March / April 2014
Centre for Law, Economics and Society CPD Course
The Evolving Jurisprudence of Vertical Restraints
  • Speaker: Professor William Comanor (University of California)
  • Accreditation: 10 CPD hour SRA & BSB
About this event
This 10-hour course explores the evolving jurisprudence of vertical restraints and their relation to developments in economic analysis and doctrine. By the end of this course students will have an understanding of the law and economics of vertical restraints and will enable students to critically engage with the latest economic commentary on this topic. Student will also have an overview of the most recent case law and statutory materials from the topic area. 
Thursday 3 April 2014
UCL Private Law Group
New Work in Obligations (Invitation only workshop)
  • Speaker: Kim Bouwer (UCL); Niamh Connolly (Trinity College Dublin); Andrew Dyson (Oxford); Matthew Dyson (Cambridge); Dorota Leczykiewicz (Oxford); and Phillip Morgan (UCL and York)
  • Chair: Prof. Paul Mitchell and Prof. Charles Mitchell (UCL)
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited with CPD
An invitation only one day workshop for young academics exploring new works in obligations. Papers include: “When Gist is a Mist: What Negligence Does with Bad Air”; “Void Contracts and Unjust Enrichment”; “The Relationship Between Mitigation and Supervening Causation in the Law of Damages”; “Comparing fields of law: understanding where the law creates and crosses boundaries”; “Interpretation of EU law and contractual terms: regulatory and deregulatory trends in recent case law of the Court of Justice of the EU”; and “Charitable Immunities”

Thursday 27 March 2014
Institute for Human Rights
Gender, Human Rights, and Cultural Relativism. Tackling the Issues of FGM and Gender Violence in Domestic Law
  • Speaker: Dexter Dias QC, Barrister (Queen's Councel), Garden's Court Chambers, and Leyla Hussein, FGM activist and survivor, and Co-Founder, Daughters of Eve)
  • Chair: Dr Saladin Meckled-Garcia, Lecturer in Human Rights and Political Theory, UCL School of Public Policy, and Co-Director of the UCL Institute for Human Rights
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited for CPD
About this event
This event will look to address the reality and the causes of FGM. It will look at the prosecution vs prevention debate, and try to uncover a way forward. The issues covered will include: Women's Human Rights and gender violence, the public-private divide, and the social and political structures reinforcing women’s vulnerability in the private sphere. Can women’s rights be protected when their identity is so intrinsically linked to specific family roles? What is the role of religion, culture, and the state, in relation to these structures and to FGM? Please note that the documentary shown contains scenes and language of a graphic nature which some viewers may find distressing. Viewer discretion is advised
Thursday 27 March 2014
Current Legal Problems Lecture
The dialogic model of constitutionalism and the system of checks and balances
  • Speaker: Professor Roberto Gargarella (Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Argentina & Leverhulme Trust Visiting Professor at UCL)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA and BSB
About this event
Numerous countries in the world have, in one way or another, incorporated social and economic rights (SER) in their Constitutions. However, while these Constitutions look modern and rights-rich, they also look old and regressive concerning the organization of governmental power -particularly in what regards the organization of a system of checks and balances. As a consequence, a recurring problem affecting these Constitutions is the “mismatch” between their progressive, 21st century commitments concerning SER and the form of constitutional democracy inherited from the 18th century. In my presentation I will examine both the promise of the bill-of-rights sections of these renewed Constitutions and the frustrations generated by the organization-of-powers-sections of the same documents. In particular, I will show how a deliberative conception of democracy and a dialogic understanding of the system of checks and balances can help us make the promise of SER – the achievement of a just society - a reality.

Tuesday 25 March 2014
Labour Rights Institute (LRI) Lecture
Privacy and Employment: Time for Reform?
  • Speaker: Gillian Morris (Matrix Chambers/UCL)
  • Chair: Dr Nicola Countouris (UCL)
  • Accreditation: This event was accredited with 1 CPD hour
About this event
In an age of electronic communications and social media there are now a multitude of ways in which employers may seek information about workers and prospective workers. English law in this area is complex and fragmented and it may be difficult in practice for workers to enforce their rights. One area of particular concern is the relevance of 'consent' to whether the provision of personal information is lawful and what 'consent' means in reality in the employment sphere. In this seminar Professor Gillian Morris asks whether it is now time for the law to adopt a more integrated approach to privacy which takes adequate account of the specific issues that may arise in relation to employment.

Monday 24 March 2014
UCL Institute for Human Rights and Labour Rights Institute:
HIV/AIDS at Work: I.B. v Greece
  • Speaker: Colm O'Cinneide (Reader in Law, UCL Faculty of Laws, and Member of the European Committee of Social Rights), Professor Matthew Weait (Professor of Law & Policy, Birckbeck School of Law), and Professor Robert Wintemute (Professor of Human Rights Law, The Dickson Poon School of Law, King's College London)
  • Chair: Dr Virginia Mantouvalou (Reader in Human Rights and Labour Law, UCL)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
In the first ever case relating to HIV/AIDS discrimination in the workplace, I.B. v. Greece, the European Court of Human Rights held that the dismissal of an HIV-positive worker in response to workforce pressure violated human rights. The applicant was represented by the Co-Directors of the UCL Institute for Human Rights, Dr George Letsas and Dr Virginia Mantouvalou. The case concerned an employee, I.B., who was dismissed from his job in the private sector, when colleagues found out that he had HIV. They refused to work with him, demanding his dismissal. The employee challenged the dismissal as unlawful. However, the Greek Court of Cassation upheld the dismissal on the ground that it was not motivated by hostility towards his HIV status on the part of the employer, but by the need to ensure the peaceful running of the business. The European Court of Human Rights ruled that this the applicant's dismissal violates the European Convention on Human Rights. This seminar will place the case in its broader context of HIV discrimination and stigma in the workplace, the law on equality and discrimination, as well as the protection of labour rights in the European Convention on Human Rights.
Thursday 20 March 2014
Current Legal Problems Lecture
Whither the margin of appreciation?
  • Speaker: President Dean Spielman (European Court of Human Rights)
  • Chair: The Rt Hon The Lord Neuberger
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA and BSB
About this event
The doctrine of the margin of appreciation may be regarded as being among the most prominent judge-made legal constructs in European human rights jurisprudence. It is an analytical tool that guides the European Court in its examination of the complaints raised under many, but not all, provisions of the Convention and its Protocols. It makes for a body of human rights law that accepts pluralism over uniformity, as long as the fundamental guarantees are effectively observed. Alongside its normative function, the doctrine pursues what may be termed a systemic objective. It devolves a large measure of responsibility for scrutinising the acts or omissions of national authorities to the national courts, placing them in their natural, primary role in the protection of human rights. It is therefore neither a gift nor a concession, but more an incentive to the domestic judge to conduct the necessary Convention review, realising in this way the principle of subsidiarity. Protocol No. 15, adopted in May 2013 and currently in the process of ratification by the 47 Contracting Parties, will add to the Preamble of the Convention references to both the margin of appreciation and subsidiarity. What are the implications of this reform for the Strasbourg Court? And for national courts?
Wednesday 19 March 2014
Social & Legal Philosophy Colloquium
Justice and Feasibility
  • Speaker: Professor Norman Daniels (Mary B. Saltonstall Professor & Professor of Ethics and Population Health, Harvard)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD

About the speaker
Norman Daniels is Mary B. Saltonstall Professor and Professor of Ethics and Population Health at the Harvard School of Public Health
Wednesday 19 March 2014
EUGLOBAL
The European Neighbourhood Policy and the Eastern Neighbours of the European Union: What Next?
  • Speaker: Dr Narine Ghazaryan (Brunel Law School)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
The topic of this seminar is the European Neighbourhood Policy which offers an integration without membership to the neighbouring states of the EU. A decade has passed since the launch of the policy which allows casting a retrospective look at its failures or perhaps its achievements. The Eastern neighbourhood is particularly indicative in this context, as the relations between the EU and some of its neighbours have reached a seeming stalemate. The seminar therefore summarises the journey of the policy to this date and raises certain questions as to its future prospects.
Tuesday 18 March 2014
Britain & Europe Seminar Series
EMU Governance, EU Citizenship and Public Procurement : Introduction and discussion of the UK FIDE Reports 2014
  • Part I : Union Citizenship: Development, Impact and Challenges - UK Rapporteurs: Thomas Horsley, (University of Liverpool), Stephanie Reynolds (University of Liverpool) | Public Procurement Law: Limitations, Opportunities and Paradoxes - UK Rapporteur: Brian Doherty (Northern Ireland Executive)
  • Part II : Britain & the Eurozone (FIDE topic: The Economic and Monetary Union) - UK Rapporteurs: Professor Piet Eeckhout (UCL Laws), Dr Michael Waibel (University of Cambridge)
  • Chair: Professor Sir Alan Dashwood QC (City University and President, UKAEL)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA & BSB
About this event:
The relationship between Britain and Europe is a highly contested issue that dominates political and academic debates. The UCL 'Britain and Europe' seminar series examines the relationship between the United Kingdom, and both the European Union and the Council of Europe. The aim of the series is to discuss important policy issues, with a special focus on their legal dimension. Topics to be addressed include the EU referendum, immigration, human rights, competition policy and taxation. This series is in association with the UCL European Institute, UCL Institute for Human Rights and the UCL Centre for Law and Governance in Europe
Friday 14 March 2014
Tony Thomas Seminar in Roman Law:
The Birth of a Profession: The Jurists of the Roman Republic
  • Speaker: Dr Christine Lehne (University of Innsbruck)
  • Chair: prof. Paul Mitchell (UCL)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this talk:
JAC (Tony) Thomas was Professor of Roman Law at UCL from 1965 to 1981. His famously inspiring lectures and influential research established a tradition of Roman law scholarship in the Faculty of Laws, which the Tony Thomas Seminars in Roman Law both continue and celebrate
Friday 14 March 2014
UCL Centre for Ethics and Law
The place of 'institutions' in the idea of 'corruption'
  • Speaker: Professor Lawrence Lessig, (Roy L. Furman Professor of Law, Harvard University)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this lecture
In this talk, Professor Lessig introduces the idea of “institutional corruption,” and uses it to understand pathologies in important public institutions, especially the United States Congress.

Watch the film of Professor Lawrence Lessig's lecture
Friday 14 March 2014
London Guantánamo Campaign lecture:
An Audience with Dennis Edney QC
  • Speaker: Dennis Edney QC
  • Chair: Dr Douglas Guilfoyle (UCL)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this lecture
The London Guantánamo Campaign is bringing Dennis Edney QC to the UK in March 2014. Mr Edney is the Canadian lawyer of Omar Khadr, the Canadian former Guantánamo prisoner who was arrested aged 15 in Afghanistan, tortured at Bagram, and held in Guantánamo where he is the only person since WWII to be convicted as an adult of war crimes committed as a minor under a secret plea bargain. He returned to Canada in September 2012 where he remains in prison and has recently launched an appeal against his US conviction and the Canadian government for breaches of his constitutional rights. The purpose of the visit is to raise awareness of the issue involved in Khadr's unique case and support for both Messrs Edney and Khadr, who are vilified by the Canadian media.

Wednesday 12 March 2014>
UCL Bentham Association Presidential Address and Dinner:
Are the judges too powerful?
  • Speaker: The Rt Hon The Lord Dyson
  • Chair: Edwin Glasgow CBE QC
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited for CPD
About this event
The Annual UCL Laws Alumni group, the Bentham Association, annual Presidential Address and Dinner.



Read the paper from this talk
Wednesday 12 March 2014
UCL Centre for Commercial Law
The Uses of Behavioural Law and Economics to Better Understand Debates in Corporate Law
  • Speaker: Prof. Claire A. Hill (University of Minnesota Law School
  • Accreditation: This event was not accredited for CPD
About this event
Law’s view of human nature is surprisingly underdeveloped. Law and economics uses the admittedly unrealistic ‘rational person’ model. Behavioral law and economics has sought to bring more realism to law and economics. But it is has too often focused on “mistakes.” Indeed, some people use the term “heuristics and biases” as a synonym for behavioral law and economics. The worldview in which people are either making mistakes or “getting it right” isn’t much more realistic than the one in which people are always “getting it right.” In this seminar, Claire Hill argues that to be more realistic and useful, legal scholars should pay far more attention to “priors.” Priors for this purpose are not simply prior beliefs – they include many aspects of a person’s mental state, conscious and not conscious. They include the person’s values, temperament, attitudes, and self-identification. The priors that the literature considers are mostly mistaken beliefs or biases; once these are identified in a particular context, ways to ‘correct’ or limit the effect of the mistake or the use some debiasing technique, are typically proposed. But many priors are not mistakes in any accurate or meaningful sense of that world.

Monday 10 March 2014
UCL Institute for Human Rights
Is Prolonged Solitary Confinement Cruel and Inhumane? The Experience of California Prisoners
  • Speaker: Professor Jules Lobel (Bessie McKee Walthour Endowed Chair Professor, University of Pittsburgh Law School)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the SRA and BSB
About this event
California holds several thousand prisoners in solitary confinement throughout the state. Over 1000 of these prisoners confined in isolation are at Pelican Bay State Penitentiary. They live in 80 square foot windowless cells, locked in their cells for 22 ½ to 24 hours a day. Hundreds of prisoners have been held in solitary for over a decade, many for over two decades. Last summer, 30,000 California prisoners went on hunger strike in protest over California's use of solitary. This talk discussed why United States courts have thus far refused to hold that the use of such prolonged solitary confinement constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, why that might change now, and the movement in California to end such use.

Thursday 6 March 2014
UCL Laws Inaugural Lecture
Precarious Professionalism - Some evidence on Market, State and Lawyer Utopias
  • Speaker: Prof. Richard Moorhead (UCL)
  • Chair: The Hon Mr Justice Blair
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour by the SRA and BSB
About this event
Since the era of Margaret Thatcher, and her much admired Lord Chancellor, Lord Mackay of Clashfern, the legal profession has found itself under increasing scrutiny and pressure. Legal Aid and legal market reform began then but has been significantly accelerated by the creation of the Legal Services Board. Professional power has decreased and the influence of the market increased. State – or rather politician - hostility to lawyers and fiscal retrenchment has led to a reduction in legal aid and concerted attempts to weaken lawyer and court roles in the resolution of disputes. Globalisation and the growth of large law firms has increased the extent to which law is seen as a business rather than a profession. Market reform and the recession have shed a harsher light on the economics and ethics of large law firms. For many, the market and the State are combining to squeeze out professionalism. The evidence, however, paints a much more complicated picture. This lecture will outline that evidence, including some new evidence on the ethical consciousness of commercial lawyers. It will argue that professionalism is precarious - demonstrably so - but also that the blame lies with markets, with the State, and with lawyers themselves.

Wednesday 5 March 2014
International Law Association (British Branch) Lecture
What is an international crime?
  • Speaker: Professor Kevin Jon Heller (Prof. of Criminal Law, SOAS)
  • Chair: Dr Kimberley Trapp (UCL)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA and BSB
About this event
Nearly all ICL scholars accept the idea that an international crime is an act that is directly criminalized by international law. Professor Heller will challenge that definition, what he calls the “direct-criminalization thesis,” in this lecture. More specifically, he argue that the thesis can only be defended on the basis of an unconvincing and illegitimate naturalist understanding of the creation of international law -- and that any attempt to defend the direct-criminalization thesis on positivist grounds collapses it into what he calls the "national-criminalization thesis," the idea that an international crime is an act that all states are obligated to domestically criminalize.
Wednesday 5 March 2014
Social & Legal Philosophy Colloquium
Reasonableness and the Reasonable Person Standard in Criminal Law
  • Speaker: Professor Marcia Baron (Professor of Moral Philosophy, University of St. Andrews)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
The notions of the reasonable and of the reasonable person are often attacked as decidedly not helpful to criminal law and criminal law theory (and often the claim is made with respect not just to criminal law, but law in general). I try to show that the reasonable has a great deal more going for it, for purposes of criminal law, than is often thought. Elsewhere I try to understand what the basis for the misgivings is. In this paper, I take a step back from the issues in law and criminal law theory and examine the everyday notion of reasonableness, and more specifically to reasonableness understood as a quality we attribute to (some but not all) persons. By giving it a close look we’ll be in a better position to reflect on the suitability (or lack thereof) of reasonableness for purposes to which it is put to use in the criminal law, e.g., the heat of passion defense and (the culpability level of) negligence.

Tuesday 4 March 2014
Britain & Europe Seminar Series
Refugee Protection, Migration and Human Rights in Europe: Notes from the field
  • Speaker: Nils Muižnieks (Commissioner for Human Rights, Council of Europe)
  • Chair: Dr Virginia Mantouvalou (Co-Director of Institute for Human Rights and Reader in Human Rights and Labour Law)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA and BSB pending
About this event
The Syrian crisis is not only the world’s biggest humanitarian crisis at present, but also Europe’s biggest refugee crisis in 20 years. Last December the Commissioner carried out a “thematic mission”, following the route taken by many Syrian refugees through Turkey, Bulgaria and Germany. This journey strengthened the Commissioner’s conviction that European states can and must do much more to live up to their obligation to protect Syrian refugees. During various other country visits the Commissioner witnessed the extreme difficulties faced in general by irregular migrants, including asylum seekers, coming to the EU: ‘push-back’ practices in the Mediterranean, ‘Dublin returns’ to countries whose asylum systems are dysfunctional, and the criminalisation of migration. These problems are compounded by a raising wave of racist manifestations against migrants, by politicians, the public and the media. Racist extremism has made serious inroads in the political life of several European countries. Racism and prejudice affect also migrants originating from European countries, in particular those from the Western Balkans and the new EU member states. Roma migration has become a hot subject in the UK recently. This debate needs to be placed back into its correct context, namely, the right of every person to leave a country.

Tuesday 4 March 2014
Centre for Law, Economics & Society
Competition Law in Chile: Challenges and Prospects
  • Speaker: Felipe Irarrazabel, National Economic Prosecutor, Chile
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA
About this event
The talk will focus on the challenges that a competition agency in a small country with a transitional economy must face, to produce changes on the long-term, with a description of the evolution of institutions and stakeholders involved in the decision-making process. Emphasis will be placed on concrete experiences of Chile and in the context of Latin America.

Thursday 27 February 2014
Current Legal Problems Lecture
Comity among Authorities
  • Speaker: Prof. Timothy Endicott (Dean, Faculty of Laws, University of Oxford)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA and BSB
About this event
It is very commonly the case that one authority needs to take account of the decisions of another, in order to carry out its own responsibilities. This lecture aimed to give a general explanation of the approach that authorities ought to take toward such judgments. The principle of comity is a central element in such a general explanation. It is the principle that the authority passing judgment (Timothy Endicott called it the 'second authority') ought to act in a way that respects the capacity of the other (the 'first authority') to carry out its own role. A duty of comity is not a duty to trust the first authority. It does not require the second authority to approve of the decisions of the first. It is a duty that arises not from the rights of the first authority, nor even from the first authority's success in carrying out its duties, but from the second authority's duty to those whom it serves.

Wednesday 26 February 2014
UCL IBIL Annual Brands Lecture
Trade Marks and Designs: the Designers' Perspective
  • Speakers: Matthew Cockerill (Seymour Powell, Chris Griffin (pi global and the Museum of Brands), Alexander Carter-Silk (Speechly Bircham), and Simon Malynicz (3 New Square)
  • Chair: The Hon Mr Justice Birss
  • Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1.5 CPD hours by the SRA and BSB
About this event
Trade mark and design law make many assumptions about how designers design things and use those assumptions are the basis of tests which shape the scope of legal protection for designs. Furthermore, design-related questions underlie the tests for protectablity. These include distinctiveness, novelty, individual character, design freedom and different overall impression and functionality. In this seminar, a product and a packaging designer explained the design process and how they make design choices. Experienced lawyers then considered the extent to which the legal tests inherent in trade mark and design regulation reflect the realities of the design process.

Wednesday 26 February 2014
EUGLOBAL
International Adjudication as a Mode of European External Governance? The WTO SEAL Case
  • Speaker: Dr Rike U. Kraemer (UCL)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
The EU’s expansion of its aquis communitaire beyond European borders to non-member states and dynamics associated with it have been analyzed in the context of research on ‘EU external governance’. According to such accounts, the regular route to transfer European ideas and concepts in the context of international economic governance is through political negotiations, bilaterally as well as in the multilateral setting of the World Trade Organization (WTO). In the latter context, however, political agreement may not be the only path for the EU to shape global rules. With political decision-making in the WTO so burdensome and the organization’s dispute settlement system so efficient, the judicial clarification and shaping of law may provide another opportunity for the EU to upload its own rules into the realm of international economic governance. In our project, we explore whether WTO adjudication can be viewed as another path for EU external governance and, if so, just in how far EU-internal processes of policy formulation help the EU to expand the reach of its own values and rules in the WTO. As case study, we analyze the EU’s 2009 import prohibition for seal products and subsequent proceedings before the WTO’s dispute settlement bodies.

Tuesday 25 February 2014
UCL Centre for Ethics and Law
The Foundations and Future of Financial Regulation - Governance for Responsibility (Book Launch)
  • Co-Authors: Dr Iris (H-Y) Chiu, Reader in Law at UCL and Professor Mads Andenas, University of Oslo
  • Chair: Professor Emilios Avgouleas, University of Edinburgh Professor Charles Goodhart, LSE
  • Accreditation:1.5 CPD hour SRA and BSB
About this event
In view of the publication of ‘The Foundations and Future of Financial Regulation- Governance For Responsibility’ by Professor Mads Andenas, University of Oslo and Dr Iris H-Y Chiu, University College London in early 2014, this book launch is intended to introduce the key concepts and arguments in the book. This book offers an exploration of financial regulation in the aftermath of the crisis in order to map out the future trajectory of regulation in an age where financial stability is being emphasised as a key regulatory objective. The book focuses on the substantive regulation of the UK and the EU, within a global context, and considers the relationship between financial regulation, financial stability, institutional structures in the UK, EU and US, and the responsibility of various actors in governance. It will be of interest to academics and students of banking and finance law and comparative economics.

Friday 21 February 2014
Britain & Europe Seminar Series
Making the most of Europe - the EU's common commercial policy as a driver for growth
  • Speaker: Mr Karel De Gucht (European Commissioner for Trade)
  • Chair: Sir Stephen Wall (Chair of UCL Council)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA and BSB
About this event
EU Commissioner De Gucht addressed the benefits of EU membership when it comes to international trade negotiations. He spoke about the EU's trade agenda, and what has been achieved over the last four years. He also updatde us on the current EU-US trade and investment negotiations. The recent media controversy over investment protection negotiations was addressed straight on.

Wednesday 19 February 2014
IBIL Special Lecture
How Japanese IP Litigation Really Works
  • Speaker: Chief Judge Toshiaki Iimura of the IP High Court, Tokyo
  • Chair: Prof. Sir Robin Jacob (UCL)
  • Accreditation: This event was accredited with 1.5 CPD hours by the SRA, BSB and is relevant CPD by IPReg.

 

About this event
The Chief Judge will cover all the following topics, answer questions and entering into debate: General: the court structure, numbers, speed and trends, who the judges are and how they are selected; Interim injunctions; Procedures on the way to trial including discovery, party and court experts, what happens when the defendant attacks validity and the Japanese approach to bifurcation; Remedies, injunctions (mandatory or discretionary) damages, account of profits, legal costs, international jurisdiction Invalidation actions Post-trial procedure and the active involvement of judges in settlement discussions.

DOWNLOAD THE SLIDES FROM THIS EVENT

Friday 14 February 2014
UCL Laws Lunchtime Lecture
Mediating shipping commodity disputes
  • Speaker: Jane Andrewartha (Clyde & Co)
  • Chair: Dr Melis Ozdel
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited with CPD
About this talk
Jane will give a practitioner's view of mediation explaining the use of the process both as advocate and representative of the client and as mediator indicating, with war stories and live case studies, how mediation offers solutions that the court cannot.
Thursday 13 February 2014
Current Legal Problems Lecture
Mistaken Gifts after Pitt v Holt
  • Speaker: Dr Birke Häcker (Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance)
  • Chair: The Rt Hon Lord Justice Lloyd
  • Venue: UCL Faculty of Laws
  • Admission: Free of charge
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA and BSB
About this talk
The recent Supreme Court decision in Pitt v Holt [2013] UKSC 26 has put into sharp focus a question which has vexed English lawyers for some time: when can a donor recover a gift mistakenly made? Their Lordships ruled that there had to be a ‘causative mistake of sufficient gravity’. In the light of this ruling, the lecture will explore and try to systematise the principal competing approaches towards the recovery of mistaken gifts and to assess their underlying assumptions. How can we distinguish between mistakes which are sufficiently serious and those that are not, and what are the implications of Pitt v Holt for the law of gifts more generally? It will be argued that a pure causative mistake test may in fact be preferable to the two-stage inquiry adopted by Pitt v Holt. Properly handled, such a test could accommodate many of the concerns that often drive the call for an additional criterion of ‘sufficient gravity’.

Tuesday 11 February 2014
Britain & Europe Seminar Series
Recovering Overpaid tax: The Shifting role of the ECJ
  • Speakers: Rebecca Williams (Oxford) and Maximilian Schlote (One Essex Court)
  • Chair: Monica Bhandari (UCL)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA and BSB
About this talk
The San Giorgio principle is now well established – where tax has been levied contrary to the rules of EU law, the taxpayer has a right to recover the tax paid. This is a consequence of and an adjunct to the rights conferred on individuals by the EU provisions prohibiting those charges in the first place. What is less clear is the changing role of the ECJ in relation to overpaid tax cases further to this principle. The speakers will consider two aspects of the shifting role of the ECJ.

Thursday 6 February 2014
Current Legal Problems Lecture
Charitable Purposes and Activities
  • Speaker: Dr Jonathan Garton, University of Warwick
  • Chair: Alison McKenna, Principal Judge FTT (Charity), Finance & Tax Tribunal
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA & BSB

About this talk
When determining whether a civil society organisation has charitable status, the orthodox position has it that the activities carried on in pursuit of its purposes are not relevant, save in very limited circumstances. This lecture will consider the extent to which this is correct, and whether the reluctance to consider the nature of the activities carried on by a potential charity should be revisited in light of the regulatory consequences of charitable status, outside of which the legal definition of charity has no real meaning.

Wednesday 5 February 2014
International Law Association (British Branch) Lecture
Rethinking Jurisdiction in International Law
  • Speaker: Dr Alex Mills (UCL)
  • Chair: Dr Thomas Schultz (KCL and Editor-in-Chief, Journal of International Dispute Settlement)
  • Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1 CPD hour by the SRA (BSB pending), and 1 CPE point for Notaries
About this talk
Jurisdiction has traditionally been considered in international law as purely a question of the rights and powers of states. Conceived in this way, the rules on jurisdiction serve the function of delimiting (while accepting some overlap of) state regulatory authority – the question of when a person or event may be subject to national regulation – a function which is shared with the cognate discipline of private international law. This paper suggests that the idea and consequently the rules of jurisdiction in international law require reconceptualisation in light of three developments. The first is the growing recognition that in some circumstances the exercise of national jurisdiction may, under international law, be a question of duty or obligation rather than right. The second development is the increased acceptance that such jurisdictional duties may in some circumstances be owed not only to other states but also to private parties. The third development is the widely recognised phenomenon that private parties have the power to confer jurisdiction on national courts and to determine themselves which law governs their relationships. In combination, these developments suggest the necessity of rethinking the concept of jurisdiction in international law, to reflect the more complex realities of a modern international legal order under which states possess both jurisdictional rights and obligations, and are no longer the exclusive actors.

Wednesday 5 February 2014
Social & Legal Philosophy Colloquium
Justice in Immigration
  • Speaker: Prof. David Miller (University of Oxford)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this talk
This paper started from the assumption that (legitimate) states have a general right to control their borders and decide who to admit as future citizens. These decisions, however, should be guided by principles of justice. But which principles? To answer this we have to analyse the multifaceted relationships that may hold between states and prospective immigrants, distinguishing on the one hand between those who are either inside or outside the state’s territory, and on the other between refugees, economic migrants and ‘particularity claimants’. The claims of refugees, stemming from their human rights, are powerful though limited in scope: they hold against receiving states generally rather than the specific one to which they apply for asylum. Economic migrants cannot claim a right to be admitted as such, but only a right to have legitimate criteria of selection applied to them. In the case of particularity claimants, such as those seeking redress for harms inflicted on them or reward for the services they have rendered to the state, the main question is why awarding a right to enter should be the appropriate response to their claims. The paper concluded by asking how far principles of justice can be used to establish priorities between these different categories of migrants.
Tuesday 4 February 2014
Labour Rights Institute (LRI) Lecture
Next Generation trade unionism – what more can unions do to recruit and support Britain’s young workers?
  • Speaker: Paul Nowak (TUC Assistant Secretary General)
  • Chair: Jeremiah Pressl
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this talk
With less than 1 in 12 young workers holding a union card, what more can Britain’s unions do to reach out to the next generation of potential union members and activists? Paul Nowak, TUC assistant general secretary, will review union efforts to organise and recruit young workers and to build effective trade unions in the private service sector. The session will also explore what practical steps unions can take to make trade unionism relevant to Britain’s young workers.

Tuesday 4 February 2014
UCL Lunch Hour Lectures
Should we trust lawyers?
  • Speaker: Professor Richard Moorhead (UCL Laws)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this talk
Public trust in lawyers is on the decline. Some of this is inevitable: Hackgate, the financial scandal and Hillsborough have all involved lawyers at pivotal moments. But are lawyers just doing their jobs in these cases or crossing ethical boundaries? An analysis of professional rules, lawyer psychology and economics suggest lawyers need to do some work to rebuild trust and behave more professionally.
Friday 31 January 2014
Tony Thomas Seminars in Roman Law
Justinianus Redivivus. Some recent discoveries in palimpsest manuscripts
  • Speaker: Prof. Bernard Stolte
  • Chair: Prof. Paul Mitchell (UCL)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this series
JAC (Tony) Thomas was Professor of Roman Law at UCL from 1965 to 1981. His famously inspiring lectures and influential research established a tradition of Roman law scholarship in the Faculty of Laws, which the Tony Thomas Seminars in Roman Law both continue and celebrate.

Thursday 30 January 2014
Current Legal Problems Lecture
Evolutionary Trajectories for Transnational Labour Law: Trade in Goods to Trade in Services?
  • Speaker: Prof. Tonia Novitz (University of Bristol)
  • Chair: Prof. Keith Ewing (King's College London)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA (BSB pending)
About this event
Labour lawyers are familiar with what has been termed an ‘International Labour Code’, namely a collation of transnational norms established by institutions such as the International Labour Organisation (ILO) and European Union (EU). These norms reflect a political accommodation largely imposed by high income countries on others, which was closely related to the then dominant forms of trade, being concerned with the treatment of labour in the manufacture of goods. It is now trade in ‘services’ rather than ‘goods’ which generates an estimated 70-80% of output (and employment) in the North. In the expansion of the EU services market, we have witnessed significant modification to otherwise applicable labour standards. Globally, complex subcontracting mechanisms have led to re-labelling as ‘services’ what might have once been described as labour concerned with the manufacture of goods, so that the fundamental injunction (set out in the ILO Constitution) that ‘labour is not a commodity’ has been challenged. An open question remains the extent to which the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) can facilitate such changes and future challenges. This paper considers the opportunities that these cumulative variations in forms of trade offer to the South in terms of overcoming old (and new) patterns of dependency and underdevelopment, so that they may seek a fresh political accommodation. Given the significance of non-State actors, particularly corporate interests, such opportunities do seem limited. The analysis offered in the paper draws on Simon Deakin’s recent thinking on the use of evolutionary theory and systems theory when considering scope for adaptation and inheritance. In so doing, it highlights the potential for various alternative trajectories for transnational labour law.

Wednesday 29 January 2014
Social & Legal Philosophy Colloquium
Fidelity in Law's Commonwealth
  • Speaker: Prof. Gerald Postema (University of North Carolina / University of Cambridge)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
The rule of law promises protection and recourse against the arbitrary exercise of power. The guiding aim of the rule of law ideal is served when law’s rule extends to all forms of power in the polity, social as well as political. This paper argues that the rule of law takes hold in a polity only when law is planted firmly in a commonwealth of mutual faithfulness to the differentiated and interconnected responsibilities of fidelity to law. Law rules not only when government officials are held accountable for the discharge of their duties under law, but also when ordinary citizens structure their relationships by law and hold each other accountable to the common, public terms that the law provides.

Thursday 23 January 2014
Current Legal Problems Lecture
Exploring Solutions to a Persistent Legal Problem: Conceptualising the Rights of Children in Detention

  • Speaker: Prof. Kathryn Hollingsworth (University of Newcastle)
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA (BSB pending)

 

About this talk:
Children in detention are one of the most vulnerable groups in society, and their removal from the community and into the secure estate compounds the disadvantages that many of them have previously experienced. Rights can therefore take on even greater significance for this group. Over the past 15 years, children and their advocates have sought to use the law in an attempt to protect those rights and to bring about improvements in how children deprived of their liberty are treated. But there are limits to what has been achieved and the proposed changes to legal aid, judicial review and the possible repeal of the Human Rights Act are likely to present even greater hurdles for the realisation of the rights of detained children. This lecture will examine the developing law in this area and explore the extent to which the concepts of vulnerability and best interests have shaped the legal and human rights of children in custody. It will then go on to consider whether other concepts – including home, care and responsibility – could be better used in order to understand and secure the rights of children deprived of their liberty.
Wednesday 22 January 2014
Social & Legal Philosophy Colloquium
A Principle of Contractarian Justice
  • Speaker: Professor Albert Weale (Professor of Political Theory and Public Policy, UCL)
  • Accreditation: This event is not accredited for CPD
About this event
Scepticism about desert has been common among theorists of justice, both those who favour a social contract account and those, like Hayek, who have a different view. Yet, although the concept of desert seldom figures in contemporary contract theories of justice, it is an element in the common sense morality of modern democracies. Can we reconcile common sense thinking and social contract theory in respect of the principle of desert? The purpose of this paper is to investigate how far a social contract theory of economic justice – specifically a social contract theory that takes a contractarian form – can accommodate a principle of desert.

Thursday 16 January 2014
Current Legal Problems Lecture
In Support of an English Contract Code
  • Speaker: Prof. Andrew Tettenborn (Swansea)
  • Chair: The Rt Hon Lord Justice Longmore
  • Accreditation: 1 CPD hour SRA (BSB)
About this event
English contract law enjoys an enormous degree of rational strength, together with a practical and down-to-earth approach which is the envy of many civilian systems (and, of course, an attraction for business people for whom it exists). In doctrine and comprehensibility, however, its record is less impressive, as anyone will testify who has struggled to explain its workings in terms that make sense to a civilian audience. The aim of this lecture was to suggest that a codification of its rules from a purely English perspective would get rid of many of these difficulties, and would in addition avoid many of the problems inherent in proposals for a more or less pan-European codified contract law.


This page was last modified on 9 April, 2014