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Scientific & Technical Metaphor in English and in Translation

Publication date: May 02, 2014 04:33 PM

Start: Jun 05, 2014 05:15 PM
End: Jun 05, 2014 07:15 PM

Location: Roberts 110, UCL.

Open to: Anyone

Admission: Free

Ticketing: Pre-booking via Eventbrite (www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/scientific-and-technical-metaphor-in-english-and-in-translation-tickets-11505931551) essential

Contact: Dr Mark Shuttleworth (m.shuttleworth@ucl.ac.uk)

Speaker information: Dr Mark Shuttleworth (Senior Lecturer, SELCS); Mrs Sharmini Abdullah (PhD student, Imperial College London/SELCS)

Refreshments will be served afterwards.

The workshop will focus on a) how different types of metaphor in the popular journal Scientific American are handled by translators working into French, German, Italian, Polish, Russian and Chinese and b) how technical metaphor is translated into Malay.

In spite of a sometimes uneasy acceptance of metaphor by scientists the fact is that this figure of speech plays an important role in science on a conceptual level, while – in popular science in particular – on a discourse level it is an ever-present feature of scientific writing – whether it arises from theory creation, concept explanation, terminological convention or simply writing style. And yet what precisely are we saying when we talk about a genome as if it were a library from which information can be drawn, or a code that can be broken? When such crucial expressions are transposed into another language, to what extent can both the core idea and the nuances be kept under control? The workshop will largely focus on how different types of metaphor in the popular journal Scientific American are handled by translators working into French, German, Italian, Polish, Russian and Chinese. In addition, in a separate presentation it will consider how technical metaphor is translated into Malay. Based on research currently being pursued within SELCS, it aims to bring together people from across the College, and outside it, who are linked by an interest in the multilingual aspects of metaphor in general or scientific metaphor in particular; the hope is that as a result of contacts first made at the workshop it will be possible to begin to establish a cross-departmental interdisciplinary network of scholars who share an interest in this subject. Both proposers have published research on this topic and are involved in major on-going projects. The workshop would be of interest to graduate students as well as staff.

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