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IPPR Career Event - "Diplomacy, policy and research: pathways to working in politics"

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Filmed on Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Exclusively for SPP students, we invited three high-profile practitioners to share their experiences and answer our questions about how to pursue a career path in different areas of politics.

Diplomats for hire

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What do you do as a new or unrecognized country to make your voice heard at the global stage? Without diplomatic representation, until recently your interests were likely to be overlooked by the international community. These countries can now call Carne Ross, the founder of Independent Diplomat, an NGO that advises groups excluded from international diplomacy despite their stake in global politics. He has helped countries as diverse as Somaliland, Northern Cyprus, Kosovo and Western Sahara apprehend the intricacies of diplomacy to advance their interests as a non-state entity in a system dominated by nation states. This could signal the emergence of a new kind of diplomacy.

Are charity appeals for developing countries missing the point?

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AfricaRoad

A report from the Charities Aid Foundation in 2011 found that many of the larger charities had been particularly badly hit by this recession. It is hardly surprising then that we see so many hard-hitting charity appeals in order to raise money for projects in the developing world. As a result, we’re donating money to charities thinking that we’re buying food, medicines and clothes for individuals in desperate situations. But I feel these appeals are missing the point. Clearly addressing these issues are important but if we really want to make a real and long-lasting difference in the developing world, we need to be raising money for two other things which are considerably less glamorous: fridges and roads.

What happened to debt forgiveness for Sudan? A cure for bad memory

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Debt relief has always been an area of Development Policy plagued by slow and very partial progress.

There are 40 countries that have been flagged by the World Bank and the IMF as heavily indebted. Most are in Sub-Sahara Africa and are highly export dependent with 50% of their population living under the $1 poverty line threshold

Can Turkey be a role model for its region?

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From the outset of the ‘Arab Spring’, Turkey has pursued an active foreign policy and supported a number of recent popular uprisings throughout the Arab world. Having appeared on Arab TV channels such as Al Jazeera and Al Arabiya to express Turkish support of political opposition in revolutionary Arab countries, Turkey’s Foreign Minister, Ahmet Davutoglu, is now a familiar and popular figure in the Arab world. The Turkish Prime Minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, conducted an ‘Arab Spring Tour’, where he visited post-uprising Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. In his visit to the latter, Erdogan was greeted at the airport by the chairman of Libya’s new National Transitional Council, Mustafa Abdul-Jalil. He has even been compared by some to the late Gamal Abdel Nasser, whose pan-Arab propaganda, amongst other factors, made him a regional hero in the 1950s.

Occupy Nigeria

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January 1st, when Nigeria’s President Goodluck Jonathan announced that he was removing government subsidies of fuel costs in Nigeria, he possibly sounded the death knell of Nigeria as the world knows it. Reactions of citizens, opposition parties, experts, and labour groups were immediately loud and adverse. In the subsequent weeks, these voices of dissent only became louder and harder to ignore.

Human Trafficking and the London Games - Policy Brief

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brief

©UNODC 2006

Human trafficking in the United Kingdom is not a new security concern, however I would like to call the Mayor’s attention to the possibility of a heightened threat leading up to and during the 2012 Olympic Games in London.

The EU should engage in a dialogue with Hamas

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At a time of unprecedented change in the Arab world, it is crucial for Europe to reassess its strategy in the region and engage with a variety of actors that have previously been shunned. The EU has the opportunity to become a leader in this arena, given the different priorities that others have chosen to follow. The various upheavals that have occurred in the Arab Spring have completely shuffled the cards with regards to the actors involved in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The road to peace between the Israelis and the Palestinians is linked to creating a strong and unified voice among the Palestinians and this can only be achieved through the legitimization of Hamas as a political actor.

The Food Game

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In the past three years food prices have doubled, dropped and risen again. In January 2011, food prices reached their highest price point since 1950. Food volatility is so alarming that the word ‘crisis’ is used to describe the jump in price of the world’s three staple foods – rice, wheat and maize. While the consequences have been felt to some extent in the Western world, it has been the grim reaper of the African continent. The reasons for Africa’s food vulnerability are many, but some are due to developments within the last decade, namely Africa’s ‘Green Revolution’ and the boom of food price speculation in the commodities exchange market. Both phenomena have helped re-shape Africa’s agricultural industry, but not all for the better.

Romanian Protesters Demand Drastic Changes

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The current economic slump has brought people to the streets in all four corners of the European continent. Protesters demand better salaries, lower taxes or job protection in the face of recession. However, this is not the case in Romania, where ongoing manifestations against the government were triggered not so much by recent worsening of living conditions, but by the resignation of a well-regarded state official, Raed Arafat. The so-called reform of the healthcare system leading to Arafat’s reaction was, in fact, a political and economical aberration and was therefore withdrawn, at the first sign of electorate discontent, yet protests have continued and numbers are increasing.

The military side of America’s “Pacific century”

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China called it “war mongering”. U.S. President Obama preferred the terms “promoting a rule-based international order that ensures stability and encourages the peaceful rise of new powers.” Regardless of the interpretation, the new U.S. military strategyannounced on January 5th indicates a clear shift in the American focus towards the Asia-Pacific.

Why cutting the spiral of violence in Colombia would cause negative externalities in the Andean Countries

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For several years illegal armed groups have profited from the underdeveloped conditions suffered by many in Colombia to swell the ranks of their armies. The main victims of recruitment have usually been illiterate peasants with unsatisfied needs, of whom only a small portion joined the groups voluntarily. However, as the state response has augmented, trends are changing and voluntary enrolment is now less common.

Afghanistan Ten Years On: View from the Frontline 

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Phil, a Lance-Corporal in the British Army, reaches into his wallet and shows me the Taliban bullet that only narrowly missed him during his tour in Afghanistan last year. An old school friend who is now a Lance-Corporal in the British Army, Phil spent six months as a recovery mechanic embedded with the Scottish Guards just north of Lashkar Gar, Helmand province. His unit was subject to one of the fiercest tours of 2010, with nearly seven-hundred contacts with the enemy over seven months. Now, exactly one year today since his return and in the wake of the tenth anniversary of the initial US-led invasion, I ask him what he thinks about this seemingly endless conflict…

@IPPR #1: Strikes, public debt, Turkey and the Pacific century

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As promised, here's the first collection of articles and commentaries written by students from UCL and SOAS, both institutions part of the University of London. We are working hard to include students from other universities in this project, so you can expect an increase in the number of sources of articles very soon.

@IPPR #0 - A Welcome Note

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A few introductory words are in order. The editorial board this year has enthusiastically decided to start this project in parallel with the International Public Policy Review. 

Video - The Arab Spring, Power of the People. Highlights

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This year's seminar focused on the Arab revolution. Our co-host for this year’s seminar was the Westminster Foundation for Democracy.

Video - The Arab Spring, Power of the People. Part 2

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This year's seminar focused on the Arab revolution. Our co-host for this year’s seminar was the Westminster Foundation for Democracy.

Video - The Arab Spring, Power of the People. Part 1

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This year's seminar focused on the Arab revolution. Our co-host for this year’s seminar was the Westminster Foundation for Democracy.

IPPR FORUM 2011: The Arab Revolution

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IPPR Presents the IPPR Forum 2011

10th June 2011

This year will focus on the Arab revolution. Our co-host for this year’s seminar is the Westminster Foundation for Democracy. The seminar is to be held on the 10th of June 2011 at 4pm. The debate is to involve a number of speakers from a wide range of disciplines in order to facilitate an interdisciplinary debate. More details coming soon.

Video: IPPR Debate - 23rd March, 2011

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On the 23rd March, the first IPPR debate of 2011 took place.

The debate centered on two key issues facing journals today - 1) Plagiarism - how to deal with it and 2) Do Journals need to be printed on paper in the digital age?

IPPR Volume 7: Deadline for Submissions

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The IPPR deadline for submissions for our Volume 7 (Summer 2011) issue is fast approaching. The date after which no new submissions for this issue will be considered is 18 March 2011. IPPR provides a platform for academics, practitioners and postgraduate students to publish on a broad range of topics including international relations, public policy and political science. This is a student-led, peer-reviewed academic journal from the School of Public Policy, UCL.

The Millennium Development Goals: A mission impossible?

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Rebecca Holmes, Research Fellow at ODI talks about the possibility of achieving the MDG targets. This event - The Millennium Development Goals: A mission impossible? - was held on the 17 June 2010, from 18.30-20.00, at UCL.

Volume 6, Number 1 is now available

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This year it has been my privilege to steer the IPPR, and we have seen some grand changes. I have had the good fortune to work with an outstanding team, and have received support from a very dedicated and generous faculty. We have put together a new website, co-hosted with the ODI our inaugural IPPR Forum: “The Millennium Development Goals: A Mission Impossible?” and welcomed aboard an outstanding steering committee comprised of academics and practitioners. It is the collaboration of many that we hope will continue to keep us asking the right questions, and creating original, important and insightful dialogues. We hope you enjoy our new issue framed around ‘A World Order’, and we welcome your future contributions and readership.

New IPPR Website

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Today the new IPPR website was launched.

It will offer a modern and coherent way to access the journal. It will also offer an opportunity to keep abreast of various contemporary debates in the field in different ways – we will shortly be adding various new features which will serve to make it a thought provoking and interactive home for the IPPR, and we welcome your contributions and comments.

Volume 5 Number 1 is now available

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The latest issue of the International Public Policy Review - Volume 5, Issue 1 is now available and features a Book Review section - a new addition to the IPPR.

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