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UCL Institute of Neurology

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UCL Institute of Neurology

Research and teaching excellence

The Institute of Neurology has a world class reputation for neuroscience. The mission is to translate neuroscience discovery research into treatments for patients with neurological diseases.  A number of important research centres are based at the Institute, including the MRC Prion Unit, MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging

Professor Michael Hanna is the Director of the Institute, which is a specialist postgraduate institute of University College London, the top-ranked university in the UK for research in Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience. 

The Institute is closely associated in its work with the National Hospital for Neurology & Neurosurgery. In combination they form a national and international centre at Queen Square for teaching, training and research in neurology and allied clinical and basic neurosciences.

What We Do

Please see our Infographic highlighting key data on the Institute.

Discovery research

The overarching research mission of the Institute is to undertake world class discovery neuroscience and translate it into improved diagnostics and treatments for patients.

Translational science

The Institute aims to be the translational experimental medicine hub of UCL Neuroscience, translating pre-clinical science into experimental medicine research

Study

Queen Square is an international leader in the provision of research-led education in clinical neuroscience and has a leadership role in clinical training nationally.

IoN News

Suzanne O'Sullivan wins Wellcome Book Prize

Congratulations to Suzanne O'Sullivan, consultant neurologist, UCLH and the Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, who has won the Wellcome Book Prize 2016 for her book about psychosomatic illness. Dr O'Sullivan's debut book, It's All in Your Head, explores a range of debilitating illnesses that are medically unexplained.

Published: Apr 28, 2016 2:34:09 PM

Parkinson's chromosome deletion linked to other genetic disorders

Researchers, led by BRC-supported Professor Nicholas Wood, UCL Institute of Neurology, have made a breakthrough in their understanding of Parkinson’s disease after they discovered a chromosome deletion linked to Parkinson’s disease and other genetic disorders.This study analysed multiple datasets, including significant contribution from UKPD study and the IPDGC consortium, both had received funding from The Wellcome Trust/MRC. This study found people with Parkinson’s disease had a piece of DNA missing from chromosome 22q. This particular ‘chromosome deletion’ has up until now normally been associated with DiGeorge syndrome, a genetic disorder usually noticeable at birth that can cause heart defects, problems with the mouth, feeding and hearing, and multiple other diseases.

Published: Apr 21, 2016 2:20:30 PM