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GCSE and A-level results: it’s not just the grades that matter

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Why GCSE and A Level subject choices matter. shutterstock Jake Anders, UCL and Catherine Dilnot, Oxford Brookes University.  A-level results will soon be out, with more than 300,000 students eagerly waiting to find out if they’ve made the grade. Then come

Back to teacher development’s big questions: what is education for?

Friday, 04 August 2017

John White.  The idea of a National Education Service (NES) is gaining speed. It’s described as “a scheme to join up the disparate elements of education, providing free lifelong learning from nurseries through schools to universities and adult education”. This

We need to have a big conversation about the nature and purposes of a university or college education

Wednesday, 02 August 2017

Francis Green.  Especially since the surge in university and college enrolments around 1990, Britain’s workforce has become very much more educated. The proportion with tertiary (post-school) qualifications has been rising very fast – at roughly one percentage point per year

Brexit: what is at stake for UK universities?

Thursday, 27 July 2017

Ludovic Highman.  UK higher education is about to experience a period of turbulence, as the consequences of the UK leaving the European Union (EU) become clearer. Higher education institutions are bracing themselves for what will no doubt be a period

Why does Vietnam do so well in PISA? An example of why naïve interpretation of international rankings is such a bad idea

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

John Jerrim.  When the PISA 2015 results were released in December last year, Vietnam was one of the countries that stood out as doing remarkably well. In particular, Vietnam was ranked 8th out of all the participating countries in science,

EU and me: why are British pensioners more likely to vote against open borders than their peers across the channel?

Friday, 14 July 2017

Germ Janmaat.  The popular revolt against open borders that swept across Great Britain and the United States last year has not, so far, crossed the Channel. In The Netherlands and France mainstream parties and candidates backing the EU and globalization

Women are less likely to study STEM subjects – but disadvantaged women are even less so

Monday, 10 July 2017

Natasha Codiroli Mcmaster.  There is a vast amount of research showing that women are less likely to study STEM subjects. This is a persistent finding in countries across the world and at all levels of education, and this ultimately leads

Are Public Servants Due A Pay Rise?

Wednesday, 05 July 2017

Alex Bryson and John Forth.  Should we be paying public servants more? Some have expressed disquiet over the long-term sustainability of the 1% cap on pay settlements first introduced in 2010 and due to continue until 2019/20. Independent experts who

The crisis for young people: why housing is the key to social mobility

Tuesday, 04 July 2017

  Andy Green. Last week’s report from Alan Milburn’s Social Mobility Commission, Time for a Change, provides a useful assessment of the impact of government policies on social mobility between 1997 and 2017. Ranging over policies for the different phases

Special needs: politicians should check the evidence before making claims about inclusion

Friday, 30 June 2017

Rob Webster.  Last week, a video of controversial comments made in the Australian Parliament about pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) provoked international headlines. Voice wavering and clumsily tripping over her words, Senator Pauline Hanson unmistakably suggested that