XClose

Institute of Education

Home
Menu

IOE Blog


Why does Vietnam do so well in PISA? An example of why naïve interpretation of international rankings is such a bad idea

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

John Jerrim.  When the PISA 2015 results were released in December last year, Vietnam was one of the countries that stood out as doing remarkably well. In particular, Vietnam was ranked 8th out of all the participating countries in science,

EU and me: why are British pensioners more likely to vote against open borders than their peers across the channel?

Friday, 14 July 2017

Germ Janmaat.  The popular revolt against open borders that swept across Great Britain and the United States last year has not, so far, crossed the Channel. In The Netherlands and France mainstream parties and candidates backing the EU and globalization

Women are less likely to study STEM subjects – but disadvantaged women are even less so

Monday, 10 July 2017

Natasha Codiroli Mcmaster.  There is a vast amount of research showing that women are less likely to study STEM subjects. This is a persistent finding in countries across the world and at all levels of education, and this ultimately leads

Are Public Servants Due A Pay Rise?

Wednesday, 05 July 2017

Alex Bryson and John Forth.  Should we be paying public servants more? Some have expressed disquiet over the long-term sustainability of the 1% cap on pay settlements first introduced in 2010 and due to continue until 2019/20. Independent experts who

The crisis for young people: why housing is the key to social mobility

Tuesday, 04 July 2017

  Andy Green. Last week’s report from Alan Milburn’s Social Mobility Commission, Time for a Change, provides a useful assessment of the impact of government policies on social mobility between 1997 and 2017. Ranging over policies for the different phases

Special needs: politicians should check the evidence before making claims about inclusion

Friday, 30 June 2017

Rob Webster.  Last week, a video of controversial comments made in the Australian Parliament about pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) provoked international headlines. Voice wavering and clumsily tripping over her words, Senator Pauline Hanson unmistakably suggested that

Students need support in order to build skills for the future

Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Mutlu Cukurova and Rose Luckin.  There is a growing interest globally in teaching approaches that allow university students to work independently, often in group activities. However, our research suggests that leaving students to do their own investigations without any support is

Performance management is here to stay, but TEF needs a rethink

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Simon Marginson. The post-election regroupement of the government provides a surprising and welcome opportunity to rethink the TEF before it does too much damage, before the shaping of behaviours and unplanned consequences become entrenched. Let’s consider what might happen if

Does enjoyment go down as achievement goes up? Findings from TIMSS on how pupil attitudes to maths and science have changed over 20 years

Tuesday, 20 June 2017

Toby Greany.  When the report on the 2015 International Trends in Maths and Science Study (TIMSS) was launched late last year, the media’s focus was on how England had performed relative to other countries in the tests. The headline result

Understanding youth turnout in GenElec2017: some comments, cautions and caveats

Tuesday, 13 June 2017

Avril Keating.  Youth turnout in the British general election has once again been the focus of much media attention and social media comment, with some calling this election a “youthquake”. In this blog, I provide some contextual information for these