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Jorge Ivan Castillo Quan on Anti-Ageing research

'Anti-Ageing: Health or Beauty?' A guest blog by Jorge Ivan Castillo Quan, written for the 2015 Write About Research Competition.

http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/…/2…/07/07/anti-ageing-health-beauty/ More...

Published: Jul 8, 2015 11:51:04 AM

Talks from Gems Lab at International C. elegans Meeting

Dr Marina Ezcurra and Dr Alex Benedetto were both selected to speak at the recent International C. elegans Meeting in Los Angeles (June 24th-28th). The two talks described new breakthroughs in understanding the mechanisms by which age-related pathologies originate in C. elegans, and generated considerable interest. Alex also described a new stress-resistance assay based on death fluorescence, recently discovered in the Gems lab. For details of the C. elegans International Meeting see http://www.genetics-gsa.org/celegans/2015/ More...

Published: Jul 7, 2015 11:01:37 AM

Institute of Healthy Ageing hosts BSRA Annual Meeting

The 65th British Society for Research on Ageing Annual Meeting took place at the Institute of Healthy Ageing on July 1st-2nd 2015. Speakers at the conference included Claudio Franceschi (Bologna), Paul Shiels (Glasgow), Jesus Gil (Imperial), and Avan Aihie Sayer (Southampton). They also included several speakers from the IHA: Lazaros Foukas, who described how ageing can be slowed down in mice by reducing PI3 kinase signalling, Cathy Slack (whose talk was awarded the Korenchevsky Prize) spoke about how Ras signalling controls fruitfly ageing, and David Gems who gave a welcome address, including a discussion of “The ageing-disease false dichotomy”.
For further information about the meeting see http://www.bsra.org.uk/node/842 More...

Published: Jul 7, 2015 10:59:19 AM

Fiona Kerr - Alzheimer's Association International Conference highlights

23 July 2012

Dr Fiona Kerr (Partridge Lab) attended the AAIC in Vancouver, 14th-19th July 2012 last week.

Fiona writes: Over the last three years Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have led to the discovery of variants in 10 new genes which associate with increased risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). This has required an unprecedented level of collaboration within the AD field, pulling together clinical cohorts world-wide in order to achieve the large data-sets required to obtain meaningful findings in such studies. At this year’s AAIC the excitement re-instated in Alzheimer’s by this research was evident, with scientists looking toward the post-GWAS era of AD discovery. We need to understand more about the effect of these AD-risk variants on gene expression and function, and their potential role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease pathology. If any of these genes are found to play a causal role in AD pathogenesis, beyond simply associating with increased risk for disease development, this could uncover potential new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of LOAD.

Page last modified on 23 jul 12 13:34