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CNN news: How long can humans live?

Following her BBC interview Professor Linda Partridge spoke with CNN's Bianca Britton, whose article asks, "how long can humans live?" More...

Published: Oct 6, 2016 3:07:38 PM

Linda Partridge interviewed for BBC News on Vijg Nature Paper

On Wednesday, October 5 2016 IHA Director Professor Linda Partridge was interviewed on the BBC 6 O'Clock News about the recent Nature paper by Jan Vijg. The Nature paper entitled "Evidence for a limit to human lifespan" suggests a maximum upper age limit for humans and Prof Partridge was asked to comment on this.

Published: Oct 6, 2016 11:58:50 AM

Linda Partridge and the IHA feature interview with Time Out London

Professor Linda Partridge was recently interviewed by Time Out London and features in today's issue ('Rad Scientists', Time Out, 20/09/2016). You can read the article via our Facebook site at https://www.facebook.com/UCLInstituteofHealthyAgeing/

Published: Sep 20, 2016 11:43:25 AM

Fiona Kerr - Alzheimer's Association International Conference highlights

23 July 2012

Dr Fiona Kerr (Partridge Lab) attended the AAIC in Vancouver, 14th-19th July 2012 last week.

Fiona writes: Over the last three years Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have led to the discovery of variants in 10 new genes which associate with increased risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). This has required an unprecedented level of collaboration within the AD field, pulling together clinical cohorts world-wide in order to achieve the large data-sets required to obtain meaningful findings in such studies. At this year’s AAIC the excitement re-instated in Alzheimer’s by this research was evident, with scientists looking toward the post-GWAS era of AD discovery. We need to understand more about the effect of these AD-risk variants on gene expression and function, and their potential role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease pathology. If any of these genes are found to play a causal role in AD pathogenesis, beyond simply associating with increased risk for disease development, this could uncover potential new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of LOAD.

Page last modified on 23 jul 12 13:34