Global Health News

Gene variant linked to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and alcoholism

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Depression

A rare gene variant discovered by UCL scientists is associated with an increased risk of developing schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and alcoholism, confirms new research.

Pre-diabetes label ‘unhelpful and unnecessary’

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Blood tests are used to check for type 2 diabetes

Labelling people with moderately high blood sugar as pre-diabetic is a drastically premature measure with no medical value and huge financial and social costs, say researchers from UCL and the Mayo Clinic, Minnesota.

Drink less for a healthier heart

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Drinking wine

A reduction in alcohol consumption, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, could be linked to improved cardiovascular health, including a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, lower body mass index and blood pressure, according to new research published in the BMJ.

Working with Camden Council to get children active

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Camden Active Spaces playground design for Torriano Infants and Junior School

An initiative to see if playground design can inspire schoolchildren to be more active, Camden Active Spaces, is launched today at the Institute of Sport Exercise and Health (ISEH) in partnership with UCL and Camden Council.

Diabetes treatments ‘do more harm than good’ for many people

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Insulin injections for people with type 2 diabetes may cause more harm than good

Treatments to reduce blood sugar levels do more harm than good in many type 2 diabetes patients, particularly older people, finds new research from UCL, the University of Michigan and the Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Hospital.

Leukaemia drug found to stimulate immunity against many cancer types

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Mice without p110delta survived cancer significantly longer

A class of drug currently being used to treat leukaemia has the unexpected side-effect of boosting immune responses against many different cancers, reports a new study led by scientists at UCL and the Babraham Institute, Cambridge.

‘Map of pain’ reveals how our ability to identify the source of pain varies across the body

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Demonstration of spatial acuity test

“Where does it hurt?” is the first question asked to any person in pain.

A new UCL study defines for the first time how our ability to identify where it hurts, called “spatial acuity”, varies across the body, being most sensitive at the forehead and fingertips.

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