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International Centre For Lifecourse Studies In Society and Health
UCL Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health

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ICLS News

ICLS research academics and their evidence feature frequently in the news. Keep up to date here with all the latest developments: new papers, presentations, blogs, podcast episodes, events and announcements about the Centre and its team. 

Caring - can it hurt your mental health?

The mental health of women who take on mid and long term caring responsibilities takes a knock from which they tend not to recover quickly according to new research published today.  

Published: Sep 12, 2018 8:28:31 AM

Employed or self-employed - does it make a difference when you have a chronic illness?

Governments across the EU want us to work longer, but with age can also come chronic illnesses such as diabetes, arthritis and heart problems. This might make work in our later years more challenging so what can we do about that and does it make a difference if we are employed or self-employed?In our latest WorkLife Blog, Maria Fleischmann discusses her recently published research provides insight into how a change of work pattern could be key to keeping older people in work.

Published: Aug 21, 2018 10:27:03 AM

Taking time out to go scroll free

As the Royal Society for Public Health launches its #ScrollFreeSeptember campaign, encouraging people to take time out from using social media, ICLS Director Yvonne Kelly has been discussing the centre's research into the links between heavy social media use and poorer outcomes for children and young people.

Published: Jul 30, 2018 11:41:51 AM

More work stress - more biological wear and tear

Many governments are looking for ways to extend our working lives, but if life at work is stressful, then that can lead to poor health and an early rather than later retirement. In our latest WorkLife blog, Tarani Chandola discusses a major new study that provides a deeper understanding of how stressful situations may contribute to health problems, particularly at the end of working life.

Published: Jul 23, 2018 11:51:09 AM

Being a carer: a sizeable problem?

New research published this week shows that young women who juggle work with caring responsibilities such as looking after an older or disabled relative, are at higher risk of being obese.

Published: Jul 23, 2018 9:47:44 AM

Time to ACE the way we measure the bad things that happen to children

ICLS researcher Rebecca Lacey outlines why a new method for measuring the bad things that happen to children needs to be developed in a new article for the ICLS Child of our Time blog. Rebecca, who is embarking on new research into Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) argues that planned policy initiatives in this area will only succeed with a “fit for purpose method” of measuring these experiences and calls for a step change in the way we look at them.

Published: Jul 16, 2018 1:37:32 PM

Mixed race kids: happier than we might think

New research from ICLS casts doubt on a long held belief that mixed race and mixed ethnicity children do less well emotionally and socially than their peers. In a study of 5/6 year-olds in the US and the UK, James Nazroo and Amanda Sacker found no evidence of poorer socioemotional wellbeing for mixed race/ethnicity children. 

Published: Jul 16, 2018 1:34:43 PM

Use it or lose it: fact or fiction?

It seems there is some hard evidence to back up the commonly held view that keeping our brains active as we get older may help to keep mental decline at bay. In the latest ICLS WorkLife blog, researcher Baowen Xue shares findings from her recent research showing that the cognitive abilities of nearly 3,500 civil servants who took part in the Whitehall II Study, particularly when it came to their verbal memory, decreased over time and more rapidly after retirement.  

Published: Jul 10, 2018 12:55:39 PM

Children’s life chances: evidence published

ICLS evidence submitted to an Education Select Committee inquiry on the life chances of children has been published. The evidence, based on research findings from the Millennium Cohort Study, shows that the more risk factors a child has to contend with, the less well they do and that this is compounded over time.

Published: Jul 9, 2018 9:24:19 AM