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Latest Human Wellbeing News

Bacterial immunization prevents PTSD-like symptoms in mice

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M. vaccae

Injecting mice with a UCL-discovered bacterium can reduce stress and inflammation, preventing them from developing PTSD-like conditions, finds a new international study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

Indian medicine book to be featured on BBC Radio 4

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In the Bonesetter’s Waiting Room

In the Bonesetter’s Waiting Room: Travels through Indian Medicine, the second book by Dr Aarathi Prasad (UCL Grand Challenges), will be BBC Radio 4’s Book of the Week from 23 May.

Government research funding ‘to be exempt’ from anti-lobbying restrictions

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Houses of Parliament

Universities and Science Minister Jo Johnson has sought to reassure researchers that the proposed restrictions preventing the use of government grants to ‘lobby’ government will not apply to funding from the Research Councils, HEFCE or the National Academies.

Lesbian, gay or bisexual individuals twice as likely to suffer mental health issues

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24-03-16-Rainbow-flag

Adults who identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB) are twice as likely as heterosexual adults to suffer from anxiety or depression, according to research from UCL, London Metropolitan University and Public Health England. 

Risk of schizophrenia and other psychoses three times higher in refugees

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Refugees on the Macedonian border

A study of 1.3 million people in Sweden found that the risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia or other psychoses was three times higher in refugees than in the Swedish-born population.

Climate change adaptation spending in cities protects “wealth not people”

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New York skyline

Developed cities are spending significantly more than developing cities on measures to adapt to the impacts of climate change – with spending seemingly linked to wealth rather than number of vulnerable people – finds UCL research.

Resistance to key HIV drug ‘concerningly common’

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Map showing the countries included in the study

HIV drug resistance to tenofovir, an antiretroviral drug vital to most modern HIV treatment and prevention strategies, is surprisingly and worryingly common according to a large study led by UCL and funded by the Wellcome Trust.

1 in 10 suicide attempt risk among friends and relatives of people who die by suicide

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Help is at Hand

People bereaved by the sudden death of a friend or family member are 65% more likely to attempt suicide if the deceased died by suicide than if they died by natural causes. This brings the absolute risk up to 1 in 10, reveals new UCL research funded by the Medical Research Council.

UCL launches free online course examining global social media impact

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South Indian Field Site

Anyone with an interest in how social media is used around the world can now sign up for Why We Post: The Anthropology of Social Media, UCL’s first MOOC (massive open online course).

Early chemotherapy improves survival for men with prostate cancer

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Docetaxel

Two papers from UCL show that having early chemotherapy improves survival for men with prostate cancer. The papers, published in the Lancet and Lancet Oncology, report the results from the STAMPEDE clinical trial and a meta-analysis.

More than half of England’s poorest citizens risk undetected bowel cancer

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Diagram of the bowels

Bowel cancer is the UK’s second biggest cause of cancer death, and screening is offered through the National Health Service to everyone from age 60. But only 44% of those living in the poorest areas* in England take up this offer compared with 66% of those living in the richest areas, reports a new UCL-led study of 747,856 people.

International UCL-led study prompts rethink on the rise of diabetes in cities

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Cities Changing Diabetes

New research led by UCL for the Cities Changing Diabetes partnership shows socio-cultural factors including time pressure, commuting time and where you live play significant roles in diabetes vulnerability.

Three UCL researchers awarded Philip Leverhulme Prizes

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2015 recipients UCL

Researchers from the UCL Institute of Education, UCL Geography and the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience have recently been awarded 2015 Philip Leverhulme Prizes.

UCL professor is first UK winner of $3m Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences

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Professor John Hardy

Professor John Hardy (UCL Institute of Neurology) was last night awarded the $3 million Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences for his pioneering research into the genetic causes of Alzheimer’s disease, other forms of dementia and Parkinson’s disease.

‘Dickensian’ lung disease rates on the rise in UK pensioners

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Lungs

The number of people diagnosed with bronchiectasis, a lung condition thought to be a ‘disease of the past’, has risen considerably in the past decade and now affects more than 1% of UK pensioners, finds a new study by UCL, University College London Hospitals (UCLH) NHS Foundation Trust, Imperial College London and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The research was funded by the Medical Research Council and National Institute for Health Research.

Being moody may help us adapt to change

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Stress ball

It’s long been known that mood biases our judgments and perceptions, but this effect has usually been regarded as irrational or disadvantageous. A new theory published by UCL scientists in Trends in Cognitive Sciences argues that mood draws on experiences and can, in fact, help us quickly adapt to changes in our environment.

Withdrawing dementia drug doubles risk of nursing home placement

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Pills

Withdrawing a commonly-prescribed Alzheimer’s disease drug from people in the advanced stages of the disease doubles their risk of being placed in a nursing home within a year, according to UCL research published today in The Lancet Neurology.

Why other people's skin always feels softer

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Holding hands

Have you ever touched someone else and wondered why his or her skin felt so incredibly soft? Well, now researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on September 10 present evidence that this experience may often be an illusion.

Possible evidence for human transmission of Alzheimer’s pathology

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Nature logo

Amyloid beta pathology in the grey matter and blood vessel walls characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the related cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is observed in the brains of deceased patients who acquired Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) following treatment with prion-contaminated human growth hormone.

Higher risk of death for patients admitted to NHS hospitals at the weekend

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Ambulance

Patients admitted to hospital at the weekend are more likely to be sicker and have a higher risk of death, compared with those admitted during the week, finds an analysis published in The BMJ this week.

Antipsychotics inappropriately prescribed to people with intellectual disabilities

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Antipsychotic medication

Large numbers of people with intellectual disabilities are being inappropriately prescribed antipsychotic drugs, finds a new UCL study.

Improving treatment for systemic amyloidosis

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Whole body anterior amyloid scans of a patient with systemic amyloidosis, showing abundant amyloid in the liver before treatment and the almost complete absence of amyloid after a single dose of the new anti-SAP antibody.

A potential new approach to treat systemic amyloidosis, invented at UCL and being developed by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), marks the start of a successful and innovative academic-industry collaboration.

UCL to coordinate £16m project to crack difficult disease areas

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Scientist examines samples under a microscope

UCL has successfully coordinated a £16 million bid to work with the Medical Research Council (MRC), GSK and four other universities to improve scientists’ understanding of inflammatory and fibrotic diseases that present a serious burden to patients.

Landmark 69-year study to provide window into dementia

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Professor Nick Fox and Dr Jonathan Schott

A landmark study that has been following a group of people since their birth in the same week in March 1946 is now turning its focus to the risk factors and early signs of dementia.

Commonly prescribed drugs affect decisions to harm oneself and others

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Pills

Healthy people given the serotonin-enhancing antidepressant citalopram were willing to pay almost twice as much to prevent harm to themselves or others than those given placebo drugs in a moral decision-making experiment at UCL.

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