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A Brief Guide to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Equality

This Guide is only applicable for those staff employed in UCL Australia

 1.        What does GLBTI stand for?

‘GLBTI’ is an acronym that stands for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex. The Australian Human Rights and Equal Oopportunities Commission understands that GLBTI people form a diverse group and sexuality or gender identity is only one aspect of a person’s total identity.

2.         What are the rights of people who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex?

There is no separate human rights treaty focusing on sexuality and gender rights; but it is clear that GLBTI people have the right to enjoy all human rights available to other members of the community. In particular, people who are GLBTI enjoy the fundamental rights of non-discrimination and equality before the law.

The United Nations Human Rights Committee has been very clear that the principle of non-discrimination and equality before the law protects GLBTI people under international law. These non-discrimination provisions are in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD) and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

In March 2007, a group of human rights experts developed and adopted what is known as the Yogyakarta Principles. The Yogyakarta Principles confirm that all international human rights laws apply to GLBTI people. Click here for more information on the Yogyakarta Principles.