History of Medicine
 
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Credits for the frontpage images

Bacilli of typhoid fever.

Bacilli of typhoid fever from a culture. From Charles Singer, A Short History of Medicine (Oxford: Clarendon, 1928). Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

Cerebral hemispheres.

Cerebral hemispheres from A. Ecker, Convolutions of the Human Brain (London: Smith, Elder, 1873). Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

Caduceus surmounted by Pegasus.

Caduceus surmounted by Pegasus and cornucopiae. From Jean Fernel, Univers medicina (Paris, 1597). Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

A schematic ear.

A schematic ear. From Alphonse Bertillon, Identification anthropométrique : instructions signalétiques (Melun: Impr. Administrative, 1893). Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

Embryo after first 24 hours.

Embryo after first 24 hours. Transverse and longitudinal section. The germ layers are differentiated and formation of specialized structures has begun. From A. Kolliker, Entwicklungsgeschichte des Menschen und der höheren Thiere: akademische Vorträge (Leipzig: Wilhelm Engelman, 1861). Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

A fly hovering menacingly over a baby.

A fly sitting menacingly over a baby, suggesting the many diseases it could transfer. Society of Medical Officers of Health, 1931. Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

Drawing of head, showing cells of brain ventricles, circa 1347.

Drawing of head, showing cells of brain ventricles, circa 1347. From W. Sudhoff, ‘Die Lehre von der Hirnventrikeln...’, Arch. Gesch. Med. (1914), Vol. 7, Iss. 190. Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

A microscope from 1738.

Microscope presented by Linnaeus to Bernar Tuissieu, 1738. From: Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society (1905), 738. Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

The Nightingale Jewel.

The Nightingale Jewel. Wood engraving, from Sarah A. Tooley, The Life and Times of Florence Nightingale (London: S.H. Bousfield & Co., 1904). Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

A syringe injecting into a testtube.

A syringe returning the vaccine for animals to the tube as a way to avoid air bubles after a first extraction. From Charles Edouard Chamberland, Le charbon et la vaccination charbonneuse (Paris: Bernard Tignol, 1833). Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

A male doctor with a female patient.

Illustration of a doctor with a patient. From National Birthday Trust Fund Leaflet, 'The Expectant Mother' (revised edition), 1950s. Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.

Male figure showing veins and arteries.

Male figure showing veins and arteries. Andreas Vesalius, Humani corporis fabrica (Basle: J. Oporinus, 1543), 268. Courtesy: Wellcome Library, London.