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Gearing up for a new year

A cycling university More...

Published: Sep 30, 2014 5:32:00 PM

UCL's response to Transport for London's proposed Cycle Superhighways

UCL is currently preparing a formal response to Transport for London's proposals for both a new segregated East-West Cycle Superhighway through Central London and a North-South Cycle Superhighway between Elephant & Castle and King's Cross. If you'd like to make any make any suggestions to be considered as part of this response, please contact Joanna Marshall-Cook before Friday 3rd October.  More...

Published: Sep 26, 2014 10:28:00 AM

A new approach to recycling at UCL

As part of UCL’s ongoing work to improve recycling rates, a new approach to waste and recycling is being introduced across the university. This includes a new way to segregate waste, the introduction of hundreds of news bins and a unified waste signage scheme.  More...

Published: Sep 19, 2014 11:02:00 AM

New bike racks installed around UCL

As part of UCL's ongoing work to improve cycling facilities for staff and students, the UCL Sustainability Team have completed the installation of new parking spaces for 181 bikes around the Bloomsbury campus.  More...

Published: Aug 19, 2014 9:30:00 AM

Samiur Rahman (Department of Electronic Engineering): Phase-sensitive FMCW radar for high precision Antarctic ice shelf profile monitoring and imaging

Ice shelves are the floating extensions of Ice sheets. They essentially bottleneck the flow of ice into the ocean. The base of an ice shelf can be 2 km from its surface. So, the change of its thickness due to a warming climate will heavily affect the flow of ice into the ocean. It is therefore important to measure the melting pattern of the ice shelves very precisely in order to correlate the pattern with the seasonal changes in the climate and the ocean.
Phase-sensitive Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) Radar has provided hitherto the best solution for measuring the basal layer depth as well as imaging of the ice shelf underneath its surface. A purpose-build radar prototype of this type has recently been developed at UCL. It has the capability to measure the melt rate at mm precision per year within 2 km depth.