GREEN UCL

News & Comment

Share your images of sustainability

Green UCL is gathering your interpretations and visualisations of key sustainability themes for their Annual Report. Winning entries will receive a £50 prize and coverage in this widely-read report.  More...

Published: Jan 28, 2015 2:42:00 PM

UCL's People & Planet University League 2015 score

Compiled by student campaigning organisation People & Planet, the University League is an independent ranking of UK universities on their environmental and ethical performance.  More...

Published: Jan 20, 2015 4:00:00 PM

Pop-up cycling cafes from London By Cycle

Never ridden a bike before but want to try? Got a new bike and looking for advice on good routes? Ride a little but wish you were more confident? Just want a free coffee and to chat about bikes? More...

Published: Jan 12, 2015 11:08:00 AM

The Christmas Switch Off: your impact

Congratulations to everyone who joined in with the Christmas Switch Off. The savings you’ve helped make really is proof that we can all play a part in improving UCL’s environmental impact.  More...

Published: Jan 9, 2015 9:50:00 AM

Paula Morgenstern (UCL Energy Institute): Challenges to heat metering in poorly performing apartment blocks

Residents of district-heated apartments currently often pay for their heating based on floor space. In this context, the introduction of individual heat meters hopes to reduce household heat consumption by providing an economic incentive for lower living temperatures.
However, many district-heated blocks in the UK do not conform to today’s thermal performance standards and are poorly insulated. Through heat meters, their residents could consequently be charged a cost which is firstly higher than in comparably sized well performing blocks and secondly not fully controllable by them due to a strong influence of building fabrics. This raises problems with fairness, especially in local authority owned blocks where heating costs represent a substantial part of the occupants’ income.
This works illustrates the case of the Brunswick Centre (Bloomsbury, London), a building where the introduction of residential heat meters is anything but a straightforward measure to reduce energy consumption.