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UCL a finalist in the 2015 Green Gown Awards

Now in their eleventh year, the Green Gown Awards recognise exceptional sustainability initiatives being undertaken by universities and colleges across the UK. And UCL is a finalist in these awards for its pioneering approach to reducing vehicles on its Bloomsbury campus. More...

Published: Jul 10, 2015 10:11:00 AM

UCL launches platform to make energy data available to all

Each year, it costs around £14 million and produces over 60,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide to power UCL's estate and operations. And to manage this impact, we must be able to map and measure it.
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Published: Jul 1, 2015 10:01:00 AM

UCLIC launches hunt to find technological solutions to green challenges

With support from the UCL Sustainability Team, the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC) is looking for students to develop innovative uses for technology to help make the university more sustainable. The competition has a £500 prize and the winning entry may be implemented across UCL. More...

Published: Jun 12, 2015 12:51:00 PM

UCL's transformation explored by Artist in Residence

The construction and demolition projects taking place as part of UCL's transformation have been brought to life by the Department of Chemistry's Artist in Residence.
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Published: May 28, 2015 2:51:00 PM

Institute of Archaeology's Roof Garden

chili

The Institute of Archaeology has a thriving green team. They’re actively involved improving UCL’s environmental impact; organising book fairs, photo competitions and scoring highly in the Green Impact programme.

Last year, a group of staff and students with a shared interest in starting a growing project got together to discuss their options. Their building has a large, south-facing roof terrace area, with plenty of space for plants.

The tomato crop was so successful they were even able to make chutney from it.

So with support from their building manager, they got started; growing chillies, mint, chives, oregano, basil, mint and heritage ‘Russian Black’ tomatoes in pots and grow-bags on the roof. The tomato crop was so successful they were even able to make chutney from it.

This year, they’re expanding the project and getting more staff and students involved. They’ve got big plans (and even an archaeological botanist on board), so watch this space.

Find out more about the work of the Institute of Archaeology's Green Team.  


tomatoes