Geographic Information Science

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UCL GIS Careers Event

Published: Jan 23, 2014 5:57:27 PM

New MSc Geomatics for Building Information Modelling

Published: Aug 1, 2013 2:37:13 PM

Seminars in Geospatial Science

The Geospatial Science seminar series provides a weekly term time forum for current research and ideas, as well as speakers from prospective employers. The programme comprises a mixture of invited international and UK speakers, and researchers at the postgraduate and postdoctoral levels in UCL. The intended audience is our own M.Sc. Geographic Information Science and M.Sc. Geospatial Analysis students (who may find the sessions useful in formulating research questions and dissertation proposals of their own), Ph.D. researchers, and staff involved in our various research programmes and grants.

Seminars will take place at 4.30pm on Tuesdays, usually in Room G07 in the Pearson Building or in the Pearson Lecture Theatre if the audience is too large. 

Seminars will be chaired by Tao Cheng, Claire Ellul, Muki Haklay or Paul Longley.

2013/2014 Term 2

21st January 2014

Damien McCloud (Arup)

Title

GIS at Arup

Summary

prezi.com/lcv_yodg2yqs/ucl/

28th January 2014

Iain Willis (EQECAT)

Title

To be confirmed

Summary

To be confirmed

4th February 2014 (11:00-12:00 - Location TBC)

Professor Bin Jiang (University of Gävle, Sweden)

Title

Head/Tail Breaks for Visualizing the Fractal or Scaling Structure of Geographic Features

Summary

Things surrounding us are unevenly distributed, implying that instead of more or less similar things, there are far more small things large ones, e.g., far more small cities than large ones in a country (Zipf 1949), far more small city artifacts than large ones in a city (Salingaros and West 1999, Jiang and Liu 2012). This phenomenon is often referred to as fractal or scaling in the literature (Mandelbrot 1982, Bonner 2006). To better visualize the fractal or scaling structure, we developed a new classification scheme, namely head/tail breaks, which recursively divides things (or large things) into two imbalanced parts: a minority of large things in the head and a majority of small things in the tail (Jiang 2013). Unlike conventional classification methods like natural breaks (Jenks 1967), this new classification scheme helps efficiently and effectively visualize the underlying fractal or scaling structure in a simple and unique way. More importantly, head/tail breaks adds deep implications to statistical mapping (Jiang 2013), map generalization (Jiang, Liu and Jia 2013), cognitive mapping (Lynch 1960, Jiang 2013), and perception of beauty (Alexander 2002, Jiang and Sui 2014). The head/tail breaks derived hierarchy (or the number of the classes), namely ht-index (Jiang and Yin 2014), can be used, as an alternative to fractal dimension (Mandelbrot 1982), for quantifying complexity of geographic features, or fractals in general. 

Speaker Biography

Dr. Bin Jiang is Professor in GeoInformatics and Computational Geography at University of Gävle, Sweden. He is also affiliated to Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) at Stockholm via KTH Research School. He worked in the past with The Hong Kong Polytechnic University and the University College London’s Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis. He is the founder and chair of the International Cartographic Association Commission on Geospatial Analysis and Modeling. He has been coordinating the NordForsk-funded Nordic Network in Geographic Information Science. His research interest is geospatial analysis and modeling, in particular topological analysis of urban street networks in the context of geographic information systems. He is Associate Editor of international journal Computer, Environment and Urban Systems. 

4th February 2014 (16:30-17:30)

Chris Phillips (MapAction)

Title

To be confirmed

Summary

To be confirmed

11th February 2014

Jo Cook (Astun Technologies)

Title

To be confirmed

Summary

To be confirmed

25th February 2014

Richard Goodman (Intergraph) and Ralph Diment (Intergraph)

Title

To be confirmed

Summary

To be confirmed

4th March 2014

David Edem (Tullow Oil) and Nat Evatt (Tullow Oil)

Title

To be confirmed

Summary

To be confirmed

11th March 2014

Speaker to be confirmed

Title

To be confirmed

Summary

To be confirmed

18th March 2014

Jouke van Dijk (University of Groningen, The Netherlands)

Title

To be confirmed

Summary

To be confirmed

2013/2014 Term 1

8th October 2013

Professor Tomoki Nakaya (Ritsumeikan University, Japan)

Abstract

I introduce two case studies to demonstrate the possibility to use three-dimensional mapping of events in a space-time cube with space-time statistical data transformation for an effective spatial reasoning about spatio-temporal patterns of disease and crime outbreaks. In the case of crime analysis about snatch-and-run in Kyoto, 2003-2004, the methodology revealed that transient clusters alternatively appeared in a pair of hotspot regions. It suggests a new type of “displacement” phenomenon of crime. In the case of historical disease mapping about Typhoid fever outbreaks in Kyoto, 1928-9, the modern analytical approach to the old material provides a clearer vision on the spatio-temporal structure of detected outbreaks, and reveals a distinct discrepancy between the described outbreaks on the old maps and statistically detected clusters as space-time gaps of cluster domains. The meaning of the space-time gap may reflect social discrimination of the public health officers against residents of the deprived areas/urban slums at those age. Finally, further possibilities related to space-time cluster detection will be briefly argued.

Speaker biography

Tomoki Nakaya is Professor of geography at the College of Letters, Ritsumeikan University in Japan and co-director of the Institute of Disaster Mitigation for Urban Cultural Heritage. He was educated as geographer in the Department of Geography, Faculty of Science at the Tokyo metropolitan University and obtained Ph.D. from the university in 1997. He specialised in spatial statistics and mathematical modelling in human geography. One of his recent major research themes is to integrate spatial or space-time statistics and GIS-based visualisation for better understanding of various geographical phenomena with special interest in geography of crime and health.

15th October 2013

Patrick Rickles (UCL)

No Title or Abstract

22nd October 2013

Sarah Wise (UCL)

Title

Modeling Hotspots: An Agent-Based Approach to Simulating the 2012 Colorado Wildfire Evacuation

Abstract

Crisis response is a time-sensitive problem with multiple concurrent and interacting sub-processes. In such a high-stress environment, an individual's heterogeneity, social relationships, and spatiality all influence her chance of survival. Traditional methodologies have trouble incorporating these features of the evacuee's experience, but agent-based modeling offers a way to explore these complex systems. As an example, I have developed a simulation of the 2012 wildfires which swept across the US state of Colorado. These wildfires prompted the evacuation of over 30,000 citizens from the city of Colorado Springs alone. I demonstrate how individual characteristics, social relationships, spatial explicitness, information gathering, and decision-making processes can be applied to this system in order to explore how the evacuation proceeded and how future work might utilize such a system to help plan for disaster evacuation efforts.

29th October 2013

Alistair Leak (UCL) and Kira Kowalska (UCL)

Summary

In what may be considered the age of information social data provides new and potentially valuable insight into the routine and behaviour of real-world populations. Utilising the space-time component of recorded Twitter data, the project seeks to address weaknesses in current demographic products, namely the night-time representation of populations. Alistair and Kira will provide an overview of their work within the Uncertainty of Identity project including the use of heuristics to infer age, gender and ethnicity, and the development of a Twitter based population record comparable in structure to that of the Electoral Roll. The premise of the above being that a name is a statement of an individuals identity. The presentation will conclude with a benchmark of the Twitter derived population versus the 2007 Electoral Roll and 2011 population estimates. This work will contribute in the development of a demographic classification of online social media.

12th November 2013

Michalis Vitos (UCL), Julia Attenbuchner (UCL) and Gill Conquest (UCL)

Title

Citizen science in the rainforest

Summary

The UCL Extreme Citizen Science (ExCiteS) Research Group aims to develop theories, tools and methodologies that will enable any community – no matter their geographical location or standard of technical, numerical or textual literacy – to start a Citizen Science project to deal with issues that concern them. For such projects to succeed requires the engagement of communities, overcoming many technical, human-technology interaction and cultural challenges; our interdisciplinary group achieves this by drawing on the knowledge of geographers, anthropologists, computer scientists, Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) experts, designers, electronic engineers, ecologists and other fields.

19th November 2013

Monsuru Adepeju (UCL)

Title

Space-Time Pattern Analysis of Big Crime Datasets: Hotspots Detection for Predictive Policing

Abstract

Predicting where and when crime is likely to occur is an important aspect of police operation, especially toward the end of effective deployment of limited police resources. Crime hotspot detection is generally used, relying on historical crime datasets, to produce patterns of crime over large temporal steps such as monthly or seasonally. These patterns are then used to project the locations where crimes are likely to occur in near future at the same or larger scales. However, the use of large temporal scales are not suitable for proactive day-to-day crime intervention, especially at the local level. In this study, we combine both the global and local approach of hotspots detection to proactively identify areas of consistently high crime concentration at a finer temporal scale, i.e. daily, over a certain period of time. This approach provides better visualisation and profiling of crime patterns for better predictive policing.

22nd November 2013

Professor Manfred Fisher (Vienna University of Economics and Business)

Title

A Bayesian approach to identifying and interpreting regional convergence clubs in Europe

Abstract

This study suggests a two-step approach to identifying and interpreting regional convergence clubs in Europe. The first step involves identifying the number and composition of clubs using a space-time panel data model for annual income growth rates in conjunction with Bayesian model comparison methods. A second step uses a Bayesian space-time panel data model to assess how changes in the initial endowments of variables (that explain growth) impact regional income levels over time. These dynamic trajectories of changes in regional income levels over time allow us to draw inferences regarding the timing and magnitude of regional income responses to changes in the initial conditions for the clubs that have been identified in the first step. This is in contrast to conventional practice that involves setting the number of clubs ex ante, selecting the composition of the potential convergence clubs according to some a priori criterion (such as initial per capita income thresholds for example), and using cross-sectional growth regressions for estimation and interpretation purposes.

Speaker biography

Manfred M. Fischer is the Professor of Economic Geography & GIScience at the Vienna University of Economics and Business. He is also an Adjunct Professor in the State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information Systems at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. He received his MSc and PhD degrees in Geography and Mathematics from the University of Erlangen, and his habilitation degree from the University of Vienna. He is one of the founding editors of the Journal of Geographical Systems, and the book series Advances in Spatial Science, and co-editor of the Springer Handbook of Regional Science. For nearly four decades Professor Fischer has been involved in the development and application of (mathematical and statistical) models, methods and techniques in regional science and related disciplines, a time period during which he has published 40 books, and about 250 refereed journal articles and book chapters. For a full list of his publications see his Curriculum Vitae. In recognition of his achievements he was elected a Fellow of the International Academy of Sciences for Europe and Asia (1995), the Austrian Academy of Sciences (1996), the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (1999), and the Regional Science Association International (2006). In 2013, he also received the 2012 European Investment Bank Prize of the European Regional Science Association.

26th November 2013

Jens Kandt (UCL)

Title

Bio-social relations and the study of health disparities. Genes, place and social class.

Summary

Health disparities have long been of interest in health geography and have often been investigated with a strong focus on social and environmental aspects of place. While many of these studies have yielded contradicting evidence with respect to an independent contribution of place in shaping health, latest findings in epigenetics suggest that health research could be enhanced with biological information on local populations. In this presentation, I introduce current approaches in the study of spatial health disparities and discuss how data on surnames may be used to incorporate the biological dimension into the geographic inquiry on health. Drawing on preliminary observations made while working on three datasets – a genotyped sample of 4,300 individuals throughout the UK, the 1881 Census of Great Britain and the 2007 UK Enhanced Electoral Roll – I will suggest ways to gauge the potential of these datasets to specify biological characteristics of populations alongside other, contextual aspects of place.

3rd December 2013

Garavig Tanaksaranond (UCL)

Title

Visualisation of traffic in space-time.

Summary

Visualisation is an effective tool for studying traffic congestion using massive traffic datasets collected from traffic sensors. Existing techniques can reveal where/when congested areas are formed, developed, and moved on one or several highway roads, but it is still challenging to visualise the evolution of traffic congestion on the whole road network, especially on dense urban networks. To address this challenge, this thesis proposes various visualisation techniques: the wall map, the isosurface, and the network constrained isosurface.

This presentation will explain how the visualisation techniques were developed and how the massive amounts of traffic data were organised to improve multidimensional query response time. The development of Graphic User Interface (GUI), which allows users to interact with the traffic data and also to manipulate the visualisation, will be also explained.

10th December 2013

Chris Gale (UCL)

Title

Creating a New Open Geodemographic Classification of the UK

Summary

The current Output Area Classification (2001 OAC) is a free open geodemographic classification of the UK. Created using the 2001 UK Census, it represents a geodemographic view of the UK from over a decade ago. The extent of how representative it remains today is debatable. The perceived degradation of reliability over time, complicated by spatial variance, has led to a decline in users of the classification. The release of 2011 UK Census data allows for a new version of the classification, the 2011 Output Area Classification (2011 OAC), to be created. The 2011 OACs methodology will be made freely available and utilise open-source programs where possible to make the classification fully reproducible. This seminar will discuss the processes involved in creating the 2011 OAC and examine some of its outputs.

2012/2013 Term 2

15th January 2013

Chris Phillips (Map Action)

Title

Mapping in Disaster Response Situations. 

Summary

The talk will introduce MapAction (who they are, what they do and why they do it) and will cover the role of mapping and how great /critical/all important maps are in disaster response situations. Chris will use his real-world experience of disaster situations, in particular Haiti, as case studies throughout the talk, and will also discuss what’s happening in the wider arena of humanitarian mapping.

22nd January 2013

Damien McCloud (Arup)

Title

GIS at Arup

Summary

Damien will be talking about the use of GIS at Arup, which is a multi-national firm of designers, engineers, planners, consultants and technical specialists (responsible for, amongst many other things, the roof of Kings Cross Station).  You can find some introductory information about their use of GIS here.

29th January 2013

Jo Cook (Astun Technology)

Title

Open Source and Astun Technology

Summary

Jo will give a brief summary of what open source is, and what it's not, and talk about what they do at Astun Technology. She will discuss the technologies that she thinks are key in open source at the moment, then will talk about some ways forward for people interested in taking things further.

Jo has previously worked as an archaeologist with Oxford Archaeology, and started working with Open Source technologies as a way to overcome financial constraints on buying software.  She became involved in the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) in 2006, and has been heavily involved ever since, founding the UK chapter, and having a stint on the Board of Directors. She made the decision to concentrate full time on open source GIS about 2.5 years ago, and now works for Astun Technology, where they have a suite of mapping products all built on the open source stack

5th February 2013

Richard Goodman (Intergraph) and Ralph Diment (Intergraph)

No Title or Abstract

19th February 2013

Mike Worboys (University of Greenwich, London)

Title

Have formal approaches a role in GIS?

Summary

In this talk, I survey some past and current contributions of mathematics and logic to geographic information systems and science. We will also look at some possibilities on the horizon. I hope to make a convincing argument that formal approaches have and will continue to play a crucial part in the development of GIS.

26th February 2013

Nart Tamash (Crossrail) and Dan Irwin (Crossrail)

Title

GIS at Crossrail

Summary

Dan Irwin and Nart Tamash will provide an overview of the application of GIS within the design, construction, and management of the largest infrastructure project in Europe. It will include an overview of the project, show how GIS fits into the framework of the organisation, explain how it is used across a variety of technical areas, and elaborate upon the future use of GIS both within the project and the transport industry as a whole.

5th March 2013

AGI Panel Discussion

Summary

Members of the AGI (Association for Geographic Information) will form a panel to answer your questions on career options related to Geographic Information, based on their own experiences. From a variety of backgrounds, panel members will give a brief summary of their career, the route that brought them into GI-related work, and the skills which helped them get there. The panel will then try to answer your questions on pathways into the GI industry.

12th March 2013

David Edem (Tullow Oil)

Title

GIS and Tullow Oil

Summary

David Edem is the Global GIS Manager for Tullow Oil, one of the largest independent oil and gas exploration and production companies in Europe. GIS is vital to the oil and gas industry, as companies map their assets, competition, and areas they wish to investigate for new opportunities. David will be covering how GIS has shaped his career and how he's used it to make a visible impact on shaping how Tullow Oil operates.

2012/2013 Term 1

9th October 2012

Paul Richards (Kingston University London)

Title

Geopolicing

Summary

Geo-policing classifications have been inspired by geodemographic classifications, the domain structure of Indices of Multiple Deprivation and the British Crime Survey spreadsheets. The presentation will outline the context, motivation and purpose of the geo-policing classifications as well as showing how they may be created using Self Organising Map software.

16th October 2012

Paolo Battino (UCL)

Summary

The use of virtual globes, and in particular Google Earth, is increasingly popular in both formal and informal education. Basic animated tours authored with Google Earth are relatively easy to produce and those produced so far have been educationally valid in visualization terms.  However, an earlier study revealed that students tend to use tours passively. This project aims at investigating how Google Earth Tours (GETs) can be best combined with related student activities, i.e. how they can be integrated in an Active Learning approach. In this seminar we will see how we approached this challenge in terms of devising an evaluation strategy to 1) evaluate the learning outcome ("how much" they learned) and 2) evaluate the user activity ("how" they learned). We will describe how we balanced qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods, how we developed a web-based logging tools specifically for Google Earth and how we managed to apply eye-tracking (working out-of-the box on a screen-wide scale only) to a geographical scale, with no use of extra proprietary software.

23rd October 2012

Suresh Veluru (City University London) and Muhammad Adnan (UCL)

Title

Uncertainty of Identity: Identities in email addresses and social network data

Summary

This presentation proposes the methods of classifying email addresses and social network data. Email addresses can hold clues to cultural, ethnic and linguistic identity. Previous research has identified the cultural, ethnic and linguistic characteristics that can be ascribed to individuals on the basis of forename and surname conventions (Mateos et al 2011). Clues to family names are also present as substrings in e-mail addresses, and here we propose methods of categorising e-mail addresses based on the semantics of surnames. The fission of different lifestyles and advent of new media and ubiquitous computing are embedding technology ever deeper into human identity. There has been a tremendous rise in the growth of online social networks all over the world in recent times. Here we present the analysis performed on the Twitter data to identify the aspects of cultural and ethnic identity. 

References

P Mateos, P A Longley, D O’Sullivan 2011. Ethnicity and population structure in personal naming networks. 

PLoS ONE (Public Library of Science), 6(9) e22943, 1-12

30th October 2012

Michael Goodchild (University of California; Santa Barbara and University of Washington)

Title

Geographic Intelligence

Summary

Traditional geographic information provided by authoritative sources results from a lengthy and labor-intensive process of synthesis. Census data, for example, is compiled from billions of raw observations, and little detail is available about the process by which synthesis is achieved. By contrast, the vast amounts of geographic information that are now appearing on the Web are largely produced by non-experts, and any integration is likely achieved by software rather than the intervention of experts. Several examples are cited. Asserted geographic facts are clearly of variable quality, and three general strategies are advanced for addressing quality control: Linus's Law, social strategies, and strategies that make use of fundamental geographic knowledge.

13th November 2012

James Howarth (UCL)

Title

Space-time analysis and forecasting of road network data

Summary

Traffic congestion is a major problem in many large cities, with huge economic and environmental cost. One of the ways in which congestion can be alleviated is through accurate forecasting of traffic variables such as travel times and flows, which can be used to inform traffic control  strategies and provide predictive information to road users. In this seminar, the modelling and forecasting of travel times in London is discussed. I begin with a description of how the space-time dependency between road links on the network can be quantified, then discuss some of the forecasting methodologies that have been used within the STANDARD project at UCL.

20th November 2012

Patrick Rickles (UCL)

Title

Achieving Interdisciplinarity with GIS

Summary

Geographic Information Systems have been used by various disciplines to add richness to their analyses; making it a great integrator for interdisciplinary projects. My research focuses on how to identify what people need to know about GIS, to facilitate its use in their work, and how to effectively teach them. In this seminar, I will discuss the challenges of interdisciplinary research, a few case studies of projects involving multiple disciplines, and some concepts of how to teach GIS to ensure its successful uptake.

27th November 2012

Mirco Musolesi (University of Birmingham)

Title

Interdependence and Predictability of Human Mobility and Social Interactions

Summary

The study of the interdependence of human movement and social ties of individuals is one of the most interesting research areas in computational social science. Previous studies have shown that human movement is predictable to a certain extent at different geographic scales. One of the open problems is how to improve the prediction exploiting additional available information. In particular, one of the key questions is how to characterise and exploit the correlation between movements of friends and acquaintances to increase the accuracy of the forecasting algorithms. In this talk I will discuss the results of our analysis of the Nokia Mobile Data Challenge dataset showing that, by means of multivariate nonlinear predictors, it is possible to exploit mobility data of friends in order to improve user movement forecasting. This can be seen as a process of discovering correlation patterns in networks of linked social and geographic data. I will also show how mutual information can be used to quantify this correlation; I will demonstrate how to use this quantity to select individuals with correlated mobility patterns in order to improve movement prediction. Finally, I will show how the exploitation of data related to friends improves dramatically the prediction with respect to the case of information of people that do not have social ties with the user. More information about this project can be found here.

Speaker Biography

Dr. Mirco Musolesi is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Computer Science at the University of Birmingham. He received a PhD in Computer Science from University College London in 2007 and a Master in Electronic Engineering from the University of Bologna in 2002. From October 2005 to August 2007 he was a Research Fellow at the Department of Computer Science, University College London. Then, from September 2007 to August 2008 he was an ISTS Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Dartmouth College, NH, USA, and from September 2008 to October 2009 a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge. Before joining Birmingham, he was a Lecturer at the University of St. Andrews. His research interests lie in the broad area of networked systems with a current focus on large-scale data analysis, mobile sensing, social computing and network science (in particular, social and spatial networks). More information about his research profile can be found here.

4th December 2012

Christian Nold (UCL)

Title

Mapping the Material Practices of Citizen Sensing

Summary

This presentation discusses Citizen Sensing as an entanglement of devices & subjective experience and power relations. Using a case study of participatory noise pollution to identify the ontological and epistemological conflicts about what is being mapped and to what ends. The aim of this talk is to provide a real-world example of the way that subjectivity as a material affect is engaged in a political struggle over legitimacy. This approach aims to bridge a cultural and technical understanding of Citizen Sensing, by suggesting a critical material practice which can engage communities around real world issues.

11th December 2012

Monsuru Adepeju (UCL)

Title

Prospective Surveillance of Emerging Crime Patterns in Central London.

Summary

Understanding the dynamics of “repeated” crimes in space-time as well as their relationships with other social economic factors could provide clues to understanding how crimes emerge over a period of time within a geographical region. Here the Space Time Scan Statistical (STSS) method is applied to analyse the crime patterns in Camden borough of London, in prospective manner to detect ‘emerging’ space-time clusters of crimes. The case study shows the possibility of detecting crime clusters as they emerge simultaneously in both space and time before becoming statistically significant. The effectiveness of each prospective cluster’s surveillance was evaluated by comparing its ‘emergence’ date with its respective retrospective cluster ‘start date’. The overall significance of the results obtained in this analysis demonstrates that this technique is able to proactively identify areas of potential crime outburst so as to facilitate immediate prevention strategies in such areas.

2011/2012 Term 2

10th January 2012

Muhammad Adnan (UCL)

Title

Spatio-temporal linkage of real and virtual identity

Summary

A name often provides an indication of its bearer’s cultural, ethnic and religious affinity in the real world (Mateos et al 2011), as well as the place in which he or she probably lives (Cheshire and Longley 2012). This presentation begins to consider whether and how tokens of virtual identity can be linked to the probable characteristics of people and places.

We begin with a retrospective on two strands of work at UCL that has used computationally intensive analysis to classify populations into: (a) ‘naming networks’ based upon social similarities in naming conventions; and (b) ‘surname regions’, based upon locational proximity of people who share names with common geographic roots. Together, these two approaches offer the prospect of context-sensitive generalisation of the geography of naming conventions, as well as measurement of the long term effects of population change.

The second part of the presentation begins to consider the linkage between georeferenced email addresses and the probable names of their owners. We begin a preliminary investigation of data harvested from the worldnames.publicprofiler.org website, which are used to develop a spatio-temporal model of virtual identity formation. We suggest priorities and directions for future research that will link identities in real and virtual spaces.

17th January 2012

Graham Clarke (University of Leeds)

Title

GIS and spatial modelling for retail forecasting

Summary

This seminar will examine how major UK retailers use GIS and spatial modelling to identify new sites for development. It will be argued that although GIS is useful by itself, these organisations need the greater predictive power of spatial models, such as gravity or spatial interaction models. However, it will also be argued, through many case studies, that the models themselves need customisation and disaggregation in order to work effectively.

24th January 2012

Wayne Marsh (Crossrail)

Title

GIS solutions for London’s Crossrail

Summary

Crossrail is the largest civil engineering project in Europe and the largest single addition to the London transport network in over 50 years. It has been designed to provide a new railway network for London and the South East and carry 200 million passengers a year. Within Crossrail, GIS is being used through the entire lifecycle of the project, including design, construction and maintenance, integrating and joining up data such as BIM and Asset Registries. At the heart of the GIS solution is an Oracle Spatial 11g server acting as the master repository and spatial analysis tool, glueing the information together. This talk will discuss how Crossrail arrived at this solution, how it is currently being used and how we plan to enhance it in the future.  

31st January 2012

Keith Dugmore (Demographic Decisions Ltd.)

Title

The developing agenda for retailing research

Summary

This presentation will set out the ways in which the retail industry makes use of GIS as a tool for operational and strategic decision making, drawing upon the experience of the 15 major Business-2-Consumer companies that are members of the Demographics User Group (DUG) www.demographicsusergroup.co.uk. It will also set out the ways in which current government ‘open data’ initiatives are of interest to retailers, and speculate upon ways in which retailers may seek to reuse government data. The final part of the presentation will describe ways in which the Economic and Social Research Council are seeking to incentivise MSc and PhD students to conduct research into retailing issues, and the resources that are becoming available to encourage this initiative.

7th February 2012

Chris Gale (UCL)

Title

Creating a new Output Area Classification

Summary

The current Output Area Classification (OAC) uses only 2001 Census data in its construction; meaning it has become increasingly outdated since its original release. With data from the 2011 Census due to be made available by the end of 2012 plans for a new OAC are well underway. The new OAC will take advantage of not only 2011 Census data but other open source data sources that are now freely available. A new OAC will be a free, open source classification with a fully published methodology.

21st February 2012

Richard Goodman (Intergraph)

Summary

Richard will be talking about the Geomedia Professional Suite of GIS Software, highlighting its features and giving examples and case studies of where it has been deployed.

5th March 2012

Robert Brown (Remote Sensing Analyst, BMT Argoss, Atyrau, Kazakhstan); Angharad Stone (Web GIS Officer, Environment Agency); David Tong  (GIS Consultant/ Technical Solutions lead for Central Government, ESRI [UK]); Kay Pallaris (Programme Manager - Systems & Technology Department, Corporate Services at the Olympic Delivery Authority) and Chris Holcroft  (Director & CEO, AGI)

Title

AGI Environmental Special Interest Group Seminar

Summary

Members of the Environmental Special Interest Group of the AGI (Association for Geographic Information) will form a panel to answer your questions on career options related to Geographic Information, based on their own experiences. From a variety of backgrounds, panel members will give a brief summary of their career, the route that brought them into GI-related work, and the skills which helped them get there. The panel will then try to answer your questions on pathways to GI related work.

13th March 2012

James Haworth (UCL)

Title

A kernel based approach for spatio-temporal modelling and forecasting

Summary

Traditionally, statistical models have been used for spatio-temporal forecasting due to their strong theoretical foundation and interpretability. However, many large scale spatio-temporal datasets display complex, nonlinear, nonstationary properties that violate the iid assumptions of classical statistical models. Increasingly, practitioners are borrowing techniques from the machine learning community because of their innate ability to deal with this type of data. In particular, kernel based approaches such as the support vector machine have been successful because they use the so called “kernel trick” to allow linear algorithms to model nonlinear data. In this session, a kernel based approach to spatio-temporal forecasting is introduced. The model is tested using travel time data collected by automatic number plate recognition cameras on London’s road network.

20th March 2012

Garavig Tanaksaranond (UCL) and Adel Bolbol (UCL)

Title

Visualization of traffic in space-time

Summary

Traffic congestion has many negative effects on people in the city. Although large amounts of road traffic data have been collected, we still have not been able to fully understand traffic congestion. The task is becoming still more difficult because traffic data are in effect too abundant and are highly disaggregate with respect to space and time. The research reported in this presentation seeks to use visualization techniques to understand road network performance in space-time, using data gathered from monitoring devices in London.

2011/2012 Term 1

11th October 2011

Dan Lewis (UCL) and Muhammad Adnan (UCL)

Title

GIS Partnerships and Ph.D. research

Summary

Ph.D. research in GIS-related topics is focused upon the unique, complex and sometimes difficult issues that arise when asking the fundamental question ‘where?’ Much research in the area is funded by research councils, foundations and charities with interests in the science of problem-solving. But because GIS is also fundamentally an applied problem-solving technology, it can also attract research funding from organisations in the commercial, public service and government sectors. This seminar will feature the work of two recent research projects in UCL: work by Dan Lewis, who has been co-funded by Southwark Primary Care Trust in the health sector, as well as the Economic and Social Research Council; and the research of Muhammad Adnan, who has completed a Ph.D. part time while working on a Knowledge Transfer Partnership with Local Futures Group Ltd.

18th October 2011

Jiaqiu Wang (UCL) and Ioannis Tsapakis (UCL)

Title

The STANDARD Project: quantitative analysis of traffic congestion and traffic prediction in London

Summary

This presentation will focus upon short-term prediction of travel time using neural networks to accommodate space-time autocorrelation. A space-time neural network is proposed to accommodate integrated space-time autocorrelation in transport networks. An experiment is used to demonstrate that the space-time neural network model can yield accurate and robust travel time predictions based on real data.

25th October 2011

Zorica Nedovic-Budic (University College Dublin)

Title

GeoWeb and the potential synergy of information and knowledge production sources for spatial planning and policy

Summary

Spatial planning and policy is highly dependent on integration of data from variety of sources to ensure its information and knowledge-base (aka planning intelligence). The move from standalone decision-support and geographic information systems (GIS) to WebGIS, and on toward spatial data infrastructures (SDI), has in many ways revolutionalised the planning and policy processes. However, the promise of democratisation that the new technologies would bring about has not been easy to achieve. Public participation GIS and locally controlled (bottom up) systems have been promoted by academics, but never fully integrated with other more formal and institutionalised sources of information and its derivative knowledge. The development of Web 2.0 has enabled contribution of user content via Internet. The phenomena of volunteered geographic information (VGI) and more broadly conceived GeoWeb practices – ranging in scope from Google Maps and Wikimappia to more focused OpenStreetMap and other topical (e.g., environmental) applications – offer complementary sources to the official spatial data infrastructure (SDI). These new sources are more open for two-way exchange of spatial data and production of knowledge to better inform and improve the process of planning and policy formation and decision-making. While their potential to enhance the access and completeness of geospatial information is intuitively recognised, the reality of the synergy is less understood. Why various web users contribute geographic content and how we incorporate and use it in the planning and policy processes are important questions to examine before the potential is captured and channelled into useful and sustainable networks.

1st November 2011

Ross Maciejewski (Arizona State University)

Title

Syndromic Surveillance Using Geovisual Analytics

Summary

As data sources become larger and more complex, the ability to effectively explore and analyze patterns amongst varying sources becomes a critical bottleneck in analytic reasoning. Incoming data contains multiple variables, high signal to noise ratio, and a degree of uncertainty, all of which hinder exploration, hypothesis generation/ exploration, and decision making. To facilitate the exploration of such data, advanced tool sets are needed that allow the user to interact with their data in a visual environment that provides direct analytic capability for finding data aberrations or hotspots. In this talk, I will present a suite of tools designed to facilitate the exploration of spatiotemporal datasets. These tools allows users to search for hotspots in both space and time, combining linked views and interactive filtering to provide users with contextual information about their data and allow the user to develop and explore their hypotheses. Use cases will focus on syndromic surveillance emergency department records, while presenting details on how such tools and techniques can be applied to a wide array of problems.

15th November 2011

Tyng-Rong (Jenny) Roan1 (UCL) and Zhiwei Cao2 (UCL)

Title1

Modelling pedestrian evacuation

Title2

Reducing geo-processing errors by using a combinative geo-processing

Summary1

Modelling pedestrian movement is a challenge task, because human behaviour is complex and every individual is unique.  This research focuses on the situation of fire disasters in pubic buildings. To simulate a more realistic evacuation situation, this model demonstrates human evacuation behaviour based on fire investigation reports using agent-based models.

Summary2

Traditional geo-processing is implemented sequentially, and their final results are influenced by various issues, such as data uncertainty and computation efficiency. To reduce the effect of these problems, this project describes a combinative method for geo-processing, thereby avoiding data processing errors, large storage of intermediate values, and massive computations.

22nd November 2011

Ross Purves (University of Zurich)

Title

Exploring place through user generated content

Summary

Online resources such as Flickr and Gumtree provide us with new sources of data to explore the multiple ways in which locations are described and perceived by individuals. Together, these data can provide us with possibilities to develop more place-centred geographies, for example through exploration of how regions are named and perceived. In my talk I will describe methods developed to explore such data, and show how previous empirical studies on the description of place can be replicated with new media. Furthermore, I will show how such knowledge can be applied to the automatic annotation of georeferenced images with keywords, and comment on both the promise and limitations of work with user generated content.

29th November 2011

Ed Manley1 (UCL) and Berk Anbaroglu2 (UCL)

Title1

Understanding and modelling non-recurrent urban road congestion

Title2

Detection of emergent non-recurrent traffic congestion

Summary1

Many urban phenomena are a result of the actions and interactions of many individuals, acting independently.  This work seeks to better understand this relationship, specifically where individuals contribute towards the formation of non-recurrent road congestion.  Recent research into understanding the behaviour of individuals is presented, with further description of how simulation can be used to better understand these occurrences.

Summary2

Non-recurrent traffic congestion is one of the most important problems that cities currently face. This talk describes the adaptation of a statistical method which is proven in epidemiology to detect emerging disease outbreaks to the detection of non-recurrent congestion. The approach offers the prospect of mitigating the confounding effects of non-recurrent congestion could be mitigated.

6th December 2011

Professor Paul Longley (UCL)

Title

Geocomputation and Geodemographics

Summary

Geocomputation has come to prominence at a time when the amount of available data pertaining to an ever-widening range of human activities is without precedent. What is less well known is the provenance of many such sources or, as a consequence, how depictions based upon rich but partial digital data may be triangulated with more analytically robust spatial data infrastructures. Recent research has also demonstrated some of the ways in which the outputs of data reduction and pattern seeking techniques are sensitive to initial analytical conditions and choice of particular technique. This presentation describes some recent progress in computationally intensive processing of a range of novel data sources that can be used to devise neighbourhood scale classifications of people and places. The results might be used to identify and discriminate between long and short term dynamics of change. The presentation concludes with speculation about the prospects of relating such classifications to emergent geographies of virtual interactions and activity patterns.

13th December 2011

Patrick Weber (UCL)

No Title or Abstract

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