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Gee Research Blog

Planning for the Future – Resilience to Extreme Weather

Thu, 15 Jan 2015 15:13:14 +0000

As climate change progresses, extreme weather events are set to increase in frequency, costing billions and causing immeasurable harm to lives and livelihoods. GEE’s Professor Georgina Mace contributed to the recent Royal Society report on “Resilience to Extreme Weather”, which predicts the future impacts of increasing extreme weather events, and evaluates potential strategies for improving […]

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Forecasting Extinction

Mon, 05 Jan 2015 11:33:21 +0000

Classifying a species as either extinct or extant is important if we are to quantify and monitor current rates of biodiversity loss, but it is rare that a biologist is handy to actually observe an extinction event. Finding the last member of a species is difficult, if not impossible, so extinction classifications are usually estimates […]

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Changing Perspectives in Conservation

Thu, 18 Dec 2014 12:15:44 +0000

Our views of the importance of nature and our place within have changed dramatically over the the last century, and the prevailing paradigm has profound influences on conservation from the science that is conducted to the policies that are enacted. In a recent perspectives piece for Science, GEE’s Professor Georgina Mace considered the impacts that […]

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Function Over Form: Phenotypic Integration and the Evolution of the Mammalian Skull

Mon, 08 Dec 2014 14:05:52 +0000

Our bodies are more than just a collection of independent parts – they are complex, integrated systems that rely upon precise coordination in order to function properly. In order for a leg to function as a leg, the bones, muscles, ligaments, nerves and blood vessels must all work together as an integrated whole. This concept, […]

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Phenotypic Integration and the Evolution of the Mammalian Skull
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The Best of Both Worlds:Planning for Ecosystem Win-Wins

Sun, 16 Nov 2014 12:25:44 +0000

The normal and healthy function of ecosystems is not only of importance in conserving biodiversity, it is of utmost importance for human wellbeing as well. Ecosystems provide us with a wealth of valuable ecosystem services from food to clean water and fuel, without which our societies would crumble. However it is rare that only a […]

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Planning for Ecosystem Win-Wins
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29 April 2013


‘All about sex in fish’


Speaker:

Paulino Martinez
University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Date & Time:
Wednesday, 8 May at 5pm
Venue: Medical Sciences AV Hill Lecture Theatre (map)
Host: Judith Mank (Ext 54228)


Abstract:

Sex is a ubiquitous feature in the living world and, although a general consensus exists on its relevance for obtaining new genetic combinations for adaption, the presence of different sexes introduces new evolutionary scenarios for live. Sex determination is an especial developmental pathway, where an undifferentiated gonad is driven towards an ovary or a testis at a specific time of development mostly depending on the genetic constitution of the individual. Our view of sex determination and its evolution has been very influenced by the studies on Drosophila, mammals and birds, where a stable genetic mechanism reflected as a chromosome heteromorphism associated to a particular model of inheritance is present. Fish have demonstrated a very different pattern of sex evolution. Different genes and even environmental variants play a role and changes in sex determination can occur in a very short period of evolutionary time.


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