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Competitive Generosity Drives Charitable Donations

Fri, 17 Apr 2015 12:09:46 +0000

Unconditional generosity is a characteristic of humans on which we pride ourselves, and billions of dollars is donated to hundreds of thousands of charitable organisations every year. But look at it from an evolutionary perspective, and this trait seems difficult to explain. In some situations, giving may have evolved to advertise positive characteristics of the […]

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Annoucing the Winners of the Write About Research Competition

Fri, 10 Apr 2015 13:49:07 +0000

Thanks to everyone who entered our Write About Research competition. We received some great entries from GEE students and postdocs, covering a broad range of topics from conservation to genetics. The entries will be posted here over the coming months, so watch this space! The Winners are… Drum roll please … WINNER: David Curnick – […]

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Male Promiscuity Boosts Role of Chance in Sex Chromosome Evolution

Thu, 19 Mar 2015 15:02:31 +0000

Humans, like all mammals and birds, determine sex with chromosomes. Whether a fertilised egg develops into a male or female depends on what chromosomes it carries Scientists have long recognised that genes evolve a little differently on the sex chromosomes, and recent research in GEE suggests this may be due to differing patterns of inheritance […]

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Sloths Move Slow, Evolve Fast

Wed, 11 Mar 2015 18:20:41 +0000

Sloths might be notorious for their leisurely pace of life, but research published last year shows they are no slow coaches when it comes to evolution. Sloths, as we know and love them, are small, slow-moving creatures found in the trees of tropical rainforests. But modern sloths are pretty odd compared to their extinct relatives. […]

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Write About Research – A GEE Research Blog Competition

Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:28:43 +0000

The GEE Research blog communicates UCL science with a wider, non-specialist audience, by providing short summaries of recent research in the department of UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment. This provides an opportunity to engage with a broad audience, including other academics, students, members of the public, and even businesses and policy-makers. It is a great […]

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2011 is the 100th anniversary of the death of Francis Galton

17 May 2011

2011 is the 100th anniversary of the death of Francis Galton, the “father of eugenics” and a key figure in the history of science and of UCL. The Galton Collection, the Petrie Museum and UCL Special Collections are marking the centenary of Galton, an often controversial academic, with a number of exhibitions over the year – including the unveiling of a recently discovered photograph of Galton on his deathbed.

Galton portrait


Two exhibitions use the superb resources of the Galton Collection and UCL’s Special Collections to explore the historical content of Galton’s life and work.

This year also marks the beginning of a major project to digitise the Galton archive and collection with a view to making the material accessible to the public. Preparatory work will begin in 2011 as part of a programme generously supported by the Wellcome Trust.

An Enquiring Mind: Francis Galton 1822-1911

UCL Main Library, Wilkins Building: now - December 2011.

From baby hair to death mask, exhibits from the Galton Papers held by UCL Special Collections and the Galton Collection display Francis Galton’s life, many diverse interests, investigations and associations. His handprint, hand writing, travel journals, family photographs, statistics from his laboratory, a stuffed wallet, all combine to illustrate the timeline of his life. This exhibition also includes an exciting new find of a photograph of Galton on his deathbed, which will soon enter the Galton Collection. Gallery talks on Galton by a leading UCL academic will also be offered (times to be advertised).

Image: A portrait of Francis Galton in profile aged 66 (c. 1888). Credit: Galton Collection.

Links: 

For the online exhibition

For the Galton Collection

For article in The Lancet

Page last modified on 17 may 11 09:51