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Dating Mammalian Evolution

Fri, 28 Mar 2014 15:14:37 +0000

When the age of the dinosaurs ended around 65 million years ago, mammals stepped in to fill the gap, and the age of the placentals began. However, whether early placental mammals were already present on Earth before the demise of the dinosaurs has been the subject of a long standing debate. Recent research in GEE [...]

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The Delicate Balance of Effect and Response

Tue, 18 Feb 2014 11:50:36 +0000

We may not always be aware of it, but many wild plants, animals, fungi and even bacteria, provide crucial services to us which keep the ecosystems of Earth functioning. Environmental changes caused by human activities are now threatening many species, and those that cannot withstand these changes may be lost forever, potentially taking the services [...]

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It’s All in the Wrist

Fri, 20 Dec 2013 16:18:20 +0000

The evolution of the primate wrist has been dramatic, enabling primates to adapt to a wide variety of lifestyles and walking styles, including tree-swinging, climbing and terrestrial walking both on four legs and two. In hominids, the evolution of the bipedal gait freed up the forelimbs for tool use, and the wrist evolved independently from [...]

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The Transcriptional Profile of A ‘Wingman’

Wed, 27 Nov 2013 14:25:48 +0000

In many species, males have special adaptations to attract females. From antlers to stalk-eyes, to bright plumage and beards, males across the animal kingdom work hard to look attractive to the opposite sex. In some species, looking good isn’t enough, though. Male wild turkeys need a less attractive ‘wingman’ to help him attract a woman. [...]

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Damage and Fidelity: The Role of the Female Germline in mtDNA Inheritance

Mon, 11 Nov 2013 15:13:12 +0000

Billions of years ago, one single-celled organism engulfed another, beginning a symbiotic interaction that would change live on Earth forever. The mitochondria are what remains of this symbiotic event, and are responsible for producing energy in all eukaryotic cells. Derived from a free-living organism, they carry their own genes, but these genes are at risk [...]

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GEE Research Away Day 2011

16 May 2011

Prof Andrew Pomiankowski, Head of the UCL Research Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, with Prof John Carroll, Associate Dean, Division of Biosciences, introduced a day of dynamic talks for this second annual Research Away Day, following the success of last year's, at UCL's Chandler House on Friday 6 May 2011.

Over fifty members of staff and post-docs attended a busy and interactive programme of scientific talks comprising Prof Andres Ruiz-Linares giving a presentation on the 'Genetic history of Native Americans'  referring to inter alia Greenberg's 1986 settlement model.  This was followed by Dr Charalampos (Babis) Rallis presenting a talk on 'Dissecting signalling pathways and factors that affect cellular lifespan' and his research on S Pombe (fission yeast).  Dr Jacob Sweiry then followed with important and informative news about funding opportunities, support available, contacts, pathways to impact, fellowships etc.  Prof Pomiankowski discussed research income by grant start date; he highlighted the procedure for internal/peer grant review, cost recovery, Independent Research Fellowships,Sponsorship of Fellowship Applications for Early Career Scientists etc.  With regard to supporting and providing advice for Fellowships in specific areas, he congratulated colleagues, Prof Max Telford, Dr Max Reuter, Professor David Balding and Dr Eugene Schuster.  After a buffet lunch, Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra, acknowledging the work of Prof James Mallet and other PhD students, gave a talk on 'Heliconius, the model system for speciation genomics', highlighting divergence across colour patterning across loci. mimicry etc.  Dr Nikolas Maniatis followed with a presentation entitled 'How complex is complex inheritance?', presenting his work on Crohn's Disease, disease mapping, complex inheritance, disease heterogeneity etc.  This was followed by three quick fire new grant ideas for later feedback, with Dr Paola Oliveri, Dr Hazel Smith and Prof Max Telford.  After tea, Dr Lazaros Foukas presented on 'Insulin signalling in age-related metabolic disease'.  The day's presentations ended with Dr David Gems in GEE's Institute of Healthy Ageing who gave a talk entitled 'Reasons to be cheerful: The biology of ageing, disease, necrosis and death'  referring to the current strategy for treatments of age-related diseases, future strategy and outlined current projects and developments.

The GEE Research Away Day was organised by Prof Max Telford, and GEE's Executive Officer, Jane Dempster, provided admin support at the event.

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