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Competitive Generosity Drives Charitable Donations

Fri, 17 Apr 2015 12:09:46 +0000

Unconditional generosity is a characteristic of humans on which we pride ourselves, and billions of dollars is donated to hundreds of thousands of charitable organisations every year. But look at it from an evolutionary perspective, and this trait seems difficult to explain. In some situations, giving may have evolved to advertise positive characteristics of the […]

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Annoucing the Winners of the Write About Research Competition

Fri, 10 Apr 2015 13:49:07 +0000

Thanks to everyone who entered our Write About Research competition. We received some great entries from GEE students and postdocs, covering a broad range of topics from conservation to genetics. The entries will be posted here over the coming months, so watch this space! The Winners are… Drum roll please … WINNER: David Curnick – […]

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Male Promiscuity Boosts Role of Chance in Sex Chromosome Evolution

Thu, 19 Mar 2015 15:02:31 +0000

Humans, like all mammals and birds, determine sex with chromosomes. Whether a fertilised egg develops into a male or female depends on what chromosomes it carries Scientists have long recognised that genes evolve a little differently on the sex chromosomes, and recent research in GEE suggests this may be due to differing patterns of inheritance […]

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Sloths Move Slow, Evolve Fast

Wed, 11 Mar 2015 18:20:41 +0000

Sloths might be notorious for their leisurely pace of life, but research published last year shows they are no slow coaches when it comes to evolution. Sloths, as we know and love them, are small, slow-moving creatures found in the trees of tropical rainforests. But modern sloths are pretty odd compared to their extinct relatives. […]

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Write About Research – A GEE Research Blog Competition

Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:28:43 +0000

The GEE Research blog communicates UCL science with a wider, non-specialist audience, by providing short summaries of recent research in the department of UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment. This provides an opportunity to engage with a broad audience, including other academics, students, members of the public, and even businesses and policy-makers. It is a great […]

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GEE Research Away Day 2011

16 May 2011

Prof Andrew Pomiankowski, Head of the UCL Research Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, with Prof John Carroll, Associate Dean, Division of Biosciences, introduced a day of dynamic talks for this second annual Research Away Day, following the success of last year's, at UCL's Chandler House on Friday 6 May 2011.

Over fifty members of staff and post-docs attended a busy and interactive programme of scientific talks comprising Prof Andres Ruiz-Linares giving a presentation on the 'Genetic history of Native Americans'  referring to inter alia Greenberg's 1986 settlement model.  This was followed by Dr Charalampos (Babis) Rallis presenting a talk on 'Dissecting signalling pathways and factors that affect cellular lifespan' and his research on S Pombe (fission yeast).  Dr Jacob Sweiry then followed with important and informative news about funding opportunities, support available, contacts, pathways to impact, fellowships etc.  Prof Pomiankowski discussed research income by grant start date; he highlighted the procedure for internal/peer grant review, cost recovery, Independent Research Fellowships,Sponsorship of Fellowship Applications for Early Career Scientists etc.  With regard to supporting and providing advice for Fellowships in specific areas, he congratulated colleagues, Prof Max Telford, Dr Max Reuter, Professor David Balding and Dr Eugene Schuster.  After a buffet lunch, Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra, acknowledging the work of Prof James Mallet and other PhD students, gave a talk on 'Heliconius, the model system for speciation genomics', highlighting divergence across colour patterning across loci. mimicry etc.  Dr Nikolas Maniatis followed with a presentation entitled 'How complex is complex inheritance?', presenting his work on Crohn's Disease, disease mapping, complex inheritance, disease heterogeneity etc.  This was followed by three quick fire new grant ideas for later feedback, with Dr Paola Oliveri, Dr Hazel Smith and Prof Max Telford.  After tea, Dr Lazaros Foukas presented on 'Insulin signalling in age-related metabolic disease'.  The day's presentations ended with Dr David Gems in GEE's Institute of Healthy Ageing who gave a talk entitled 'Reasons to be cheerful: The biology of ageing, disease, necrosis and death'  referring to the current strategy for treatments of age-related diseases, future strategy and outlined current projects and developments.

The GEE Research Away Day was organised by Prof Max Telford, and GEE's Executive Officer, Jane Dempster, provided admin support at the event.

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