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Synthetic Biology and Conservation

Mon, 07 Jul 2014 16:20:18 +0000

Synthetic biology, a hybrid between Engineering and Biology, is an emerging field of research promising to change the way we think about manufacturing, medicine, food production, and even conservation and sustainability. A review paper released this month in Oryx, authored by Dr Kent Redford, Professor William Adams, Dr Rob Carlson, Bertina Ceccarelli and CBER’s Professor [...]

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Measure Twice, Cut Once: Quantifying Biases in Sexual Selection Studies

Wed, 25 Jun 2014 10:44:30 +0000

Bateman’s principles are conceptually quite simple, but form the basis of our understanding of sexual selection across the animal kingdom. First proposed in 1948, Bateman’s three principles posit that sexual selection is more intense in males than in females for three reasons: 1) males show more variability in the number of mates they have (mating [...]

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Technology for Nature?

Mon, 16 Jun 2014 13:23:54 +0000

Many of our greatest technological advances have tended to mark disaster for nature. Cars guzzle fossil fuels and contribute to global warming; industrialised farming practices cause habitat loss and pollution; computers and mobile phones require harmful mining procedures to harvest rare metals. But increasingly, ecologists and conservation biologists are asking whether we can use technology [...]

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Nice Flies Don’t Finish Last: Meiotic Drive and Sexual Selection in Stalk-Eyed Flies

Thu, 12 Jun 2014 15:54:47 +0000

While it might seem as though our genes are all working together for our own good, some of them are actually rather selfish. Scientists have known about ‘selfish genetic elements’ for nearly a century, but research to understand their behaviour and effects is ongoing. Recent research in GEE reveals how sexually selected traits are signalling [...]

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Finding a Place to Call Home: Translocation and the Plight of the Hihi

Fri, 16 May 2014 13:13:56 +0000

Climate change alters how climate is distributed both geographically and temporally. Over the coming decades, for species sensitive to climatic variables, it may become a case of ‘relocate or die’ – those species that are not able to shift their populations from old, unsuitable habitat into newly emerging suitable habitat, in line with climate change, [...]

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GEE Research Away Day 2011

16 May 2011

Prof Andrew Pomiankowski, Head of the UCL Research Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, with Prof John Carroll, Associate Dean, Division of Biosciences, introduced a day of dynamic talks for this second annual Research Away Day, following the success of last year's, at UCL's Chandler House on Friday 6 May 2011.

Over fifty members of staff and post-docs attended a busy and interactive programme of scientific talks comprising Prof Andres Ruiz-Linares giving a presentation on the 'Genetic history of Native Americans'  referring to inter alia Greenberg's 1986 settlement model.  This was followed by Dr Charalampos (Babis) Rallis presenting a talk on 'Dissecting signalling pathways and factors that affect cellular lifespan' and his research on S Pombe (fission yeast).  Dr Jacob Sweiry then followed with important and informative news about funding opportunities, support available, contacts, pathways to impact, fellowships etc.  Prof Pomiankowski discussed research income by grant start date; he highlighted the procedure for internal/peer grant review, cost recovery, Independent Research Fellowships,Sponsorship of Fellowship Applications for Early Career Scientists etc.  With regard to supporting and providing advice for Fellowships in specific areas, he congratulated colleagues, Prof Max Telford, Dr Max Reuter, Professor David Balding and Dr Eugene Schuster.  After a buffet lunch, Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra, acknowledging the work of Prof James Mallet and other PhD students, gave a talk on 'Heliconius, the model system for speciation genomics', highlighting divergence across colour patterning across loci. mimicry etc.  Dr Nikolas Maniatis followed with a presentation entitled 'How complex is complex inheritance?', presenting his work on Crohn's Disease, disease mapping, complex inheritance, disease heterogeneity etc.  This was followed by three quick fire new grant ideas for later feedback, with Dr Paola Oliveri, Dr Hazel Smith and Prof Max Telford.  After tea, Dr Lazaros Foukas presented on 'Insulin signalling in age-related metabolic disease'.  The day's presentations ended with Dr David Gems in GEE's Institute of Healthy Ageing who gave a talk entitled 'Reasons to be cheerful: The biology of ageing, disease, necrosis and death'  referring to the current strategy for treatments of age-related diseases, future strategy and outlined current projects and developments.

The GEE Research Away Day was organised by Prof Max Telford, and GEE's Executive Officer, Jane Dempster, provided admin support at the event.

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